View Full Version : How many nursing students does your school accept every year?


Jess
09-15-2007, 10:02 PM
I'm kind of curious at how many students your school accepts every year. There is still a huge nursing shortage and I just wanted to know what the rest of the world is doing.

For my university, they accept around 210ish students combined. (there is a 4-year program and a 2-year program) However, now in my second year of my 4-year program, my year has about 130 students.

KimRN
09-16-2007, 09:45 AM
I'm kind of curious at how many students your school accepts every year. There is still a huge nursing shortage and I just wanted to know what the rest of the world is doing.

For my university, they accept around 210ish students combined. (there is a 4-year program and a 2-year program) However, now in my second year of my 4-year program, my year has about 130 students.


Mine used to take 40 per year and then started taking a new class in the spring for 80 per year (pre-attrition).

I know they would take more if they had (AND PAID) more nursing professors.

That's what I'm going back to school for. It sure ain't for the money! :laugh:

Jess
09-16-2007, 10:45 AM
Haha, I know exactly what you mean! Finding professors and so many instructors is quite a problem these days, but my university has plently. :) That's why I'm sometimes curious if they keep increasing the number of students they accept...they'll need to find more instructors!

Caroline
09-16-2007, 02:16 PM
The shortage thing is so weird in schools!

Mine starts a class of about 115, including 30ish accelerated, and then the rest traditional 2 year students. That's from a pool of about 900, I think?

On the other hand, my cousin's class...well I don't know their numbers, but I know they are flunking out about half of their students every year! What the...!! I don't understand the point of that mentality...

jojodow
09-16-2007, 03:48 PM
Mine took 60 per semester in the traditional track with 40 online. About 60 graduated per semester. I hear they now take about 140 per semester and that number is going to increase with a new "Education" center they have put together combining the city hospital with several schools in the area.

I hear the problem is there isn't enough instructors out there. TX Tech just started a RN to MSN program specifically to train RNs to educate. I may take advantage of it....in a few years. Not ready to go back to school just yet.

Jess
09-17-2007, 09:59 AM
I think not enough instructors is a huge problem and will definitely increase or decrease the number of nursing students a school does accept every year. For my school, every lab instructor gets 8 or 12 students. I don't think they'll be increasing or decreasing the 8 or 12, so it's a matter of finding more instructors in the end.

PixelRN
09-17-2007, 10:38 AM
One of the problems is that nursing instructor salaries aren't high enough to draw nurses away from nursing in the hospital. I work with several senior nurses that would be interested in teaching but they aren't willing (or able) to take a pay cut.

Elocin22
09-18-2007, 03:01 AM
My school took/takes 120 per year. They usually have around 300-400 applicants.

P/J
09-18-2007, 03:59 AM
My Uni took ~100 out of a pool of ~400. This number is now down to ~80 after the first semester. The year before had about 20 students. The increase is due to the government providing more supported places (an Australian thing where our tuition costs are taken out of our pay when we start to work at the end of the degree).

Jess
09-18-2007, 09:45 AM
I'm not too sure how many people applied for nursing during my year, but wow, ~400 students is awesome. I'm glad so many people are interested in taking nursing.

Sometimes I wish that nursing could be more "out there." I know a lot of people in my year were like "This is nursing?" after the first couple of months. Then, they drop out and it's a loss for us. :(

Caroline
10-11-2007, 12:01 AM
Nah, I don't think it's a loss for us if they decide they don't like it. Better that they go and be happy doing something else than being miserable with us! :)

Mrs.Rollins
11-14-2007, 02:22 PM
My school accepts between 55-65 every term, with an attrition rate of 40-50%. Of course, I find that small number laughable considering how many people entered the program with poor grades and little motivation to succeed.

coccia81
12-15-2007, 01:08 PM
I am at a 2 year RN program in Syracusem NY. (Onondaga Community College) They accept aroung 60 people every semester. I was on a waiting list for 2 months. I applied in July and was wait-listed until September. About 1/4 of the students don't make it through the first semester, and 1/10 complete the program on time. It is a self-directed study program, and you can take as long as you want to complete the required courses and clinical rotations.

P/J
12-15-2007, 11:28 PM
This is the argument against self directed programs. By directed all of your own study, and with no deadlines to get stuff completed by, people don't end up doing the work in a progressive method, get distracted and don't end up finishing the course.

coccia81
12-16-2007, 04:21 PM
It's unbelievable how many people don't complete the program on time. Those who don't do the program in 2 years, have a much lower NCLEX pass rate.

mofo
12-17-2007, 05:27 PM
My University accepts about 120 students, I think my class is one of the largest in recent past. The school just built a new Science and Technology center, so they may be expanding the nursing program.

mystified
12-21-2007, 12:49 AM
My university accepts 80 students a semester with 20 alternates. It's a very competitive BSN program, I had a 4.0 and a I high entrance exam score and I was still slightly worried.

Nursing school in southern california is either a super long waiting list or super competitive. There are four Uni's in the Los Angeles area that offer 5 year BSN programs and UCLA is still not accredited yet.

What I find frustrating is that most of the community colleges make their decisions by lottery or by waiting list. Meaning students who may have bad grades may very well get into nursing school and have to drop out, because it's harder than they expected, meanwhile students with great grades, who are most likely going to have an easier time getting through the program have to go by luck.

I wish all school were somewhat merit based. A point system by years of prior clinical experience or grades, etc... Maybe select a few spots for lottery or waiting list, but it's not fair for mediocre students to take the spots and drop out, leaving better students high and dry for another semester.

I was lucky. I worked really hard, but I was lucky that I got in and didn't have to wait, that's why I just went straight for the BSN in the first place.

Whew... guess I had to get that off my chest.