View Full Version : Emergency Response Teams


PixelRN
09-17-2007, 10:41 AM
Hi all,

I am thinking about taking a temp job as a member of an Emergency Response Team. Basically the team would answer codes at an outpatient center in a very large hospital center.

Anyone else out there have any experience with these kink of teams?

jojodow
09-18-2007, 12:38 AM
I called our CRT (Critical Response Team) quite a few times at the Hospital. It was made up of an ICU charge nurse, an RT, and the House Supervisor (also a nurse).
Most times I would get an awesome team that took my patient slowly crashing seriously.

One time I called one when my patients BP kept dropping (from 100s/60s to 70s/40s sponatneously). The team treated me like I had wasted their time and said all the patient needed was fluids and I could've done that without them.

The whole point was to get him stable so that I could look after the other 4-5 patients I had.....better yet move him to a monitored bed or ICU. He stabilized but just for about 24 hrs and then was sent to ICU the next day.

I was lucky enough not to have anyone arrest on my watch the whole time I worked at the hospital. (Not counting the 2 expected Hospice patients I had.) :rock:

Elocin22
09-18-2007, 03:39 AM
Our hospital utilizes an rapid response team. Our goal is to prevent codes/unnecessary admissions to the CCU. It consists of the charge CCU RN (Like we don't have enough stuff to do in the first place!), RT and the supervisor. We have a set of standing orders that we can implement prior to calling the physician. (Eg. 20 mg of Lasix for CHF pt's, CT of the head for MS changes, etc.) We have had a lot of positive outcomes using it. The problem that we see arising most of the time is that the floor RN doesn't call us soon enough and the pt codes. Also, they neglect to let us know code status until we're already coding the pt.

I think it would be fun to be on a team whose primary focus was this. It provides not only an excellent opportunity for positive pt outcomes, but also a chance for education of the RNs who are calling the team.

PixelRN
09-18-2007, 07:24 AM
One time I called one when my patients BP kept dropping (from 100s/60s to 70s/40s sponatneously). The team treated me like I had wasted their time and said all the patient needed was fluids and I could've done that without them.
:rock:

Without knowing the whole story, I will venture to say that that was complete arrogance on their part. Nurses should NEVER made to feel that they were wasting the code team's time because then they are reluctant to call the code team again and like Elocin22 says, the code team isn't called soon enough and the patients end up coding.

Sheesh.

PixelRN
09-18-2007, 04:11 PM
Well, I just found out that I got the job and I start orienting next week. I will let you all know how it goes.

:party:

Jess
09-18-2007, 04:18 PM
That sounds awesome PixelRN! :) I'm not surprised you got the job, I think they'll just take about anyone at the moment! Was it just an interview?

PixelRN
09-18-2007, 04:22 PM
I think they'll just take about anyone at the moment!

What does that mean?

starkissed
09-18-2007, 08:12 PM
Congrats on getting the job! At our hospital, we use a rapid reponse team too, but it is still in its infancy stages. The point to having the team called is to stabilize patients who may potentially code. The team consists of an ICU nurse, an ER nurse, the nursing supervisor and respiratory. They have a set of orders to follow, and they facilitate communication between the floor nurses and the doctors. It is mostly used on evening/night shift though. Myself, I have never seen it used personally, but then I work dayshift.

Mother Jones, RN
09-18-2007, 08:47 PM
Good luck on your new job. It sounds very exciting, and I know you'll do great.

jojodow
09-18-2007, 09:40 PM
Well, I just found out that I got the job and I start orienting next week. I will let you all know how it goes.

:party:

Congrats!

Please keep us posted. You're right, they shouldn't have treated me that way. It didn't stop me from calling them when I needed them though. Every CRT I called had different people respond and they all had good outcomes as far as I was informed anyway.

It's a good idea...keep us posted!

geenaRN
09-18-2007, 10:59 PM
This might be a dumb question, but what would you be doing while you weren't rescuing patients? :)

KimRN
09-20-2007, 05:25 AM
Well, I just found out that I got the job and I start orienting next week. I will let you all know how it goes.

:party:

Congrats on the new job - I once heard Coronary Care described as hours of boredom punctuated by moments of sheer terror. Sounds like a Code Team to me! : )

Julie
09-20-2007, 05:40 AM
I once heard Coronary Care described as hours of boredom punctuated by moments of sheer terror

That is exactly what I remember! Eventually the adrenalin got too much and I became a District Nurse!

PixelRN
09-20-2007, 08:34 AM
Congrats on the new job - I once heard Coronary Care described as hours of boredom punctuated by moments of sheer terror. Sounds like a Code Team to me! : )

I've also heard a nurse anesthetist's job described that way.

Actually, I will be honest with you. I have a sneaking suspicion that not much will be going on between 4pm-8pm (which is when I'll be working) and they probably just need coverage for that time. If that ends up being the case then I think I will probably just be helping out in the PACU.

We'll see. Plus at this point I've been told that this will either be a three week assignment or a three month assignment. *sigh* I guess that is what happens when you go the agency route.