View Full Version : Post here if you've seen Sicko


geenaRN
06-29-2007, 04:00 PM
My husband wants to see this movie, but I've only read about how one-sided it is.

Have you seen it? I think it's been out on YouTube (?) and might be coming out in theaters today?

What did you think?

Mother Jones, RN
06-29-2007, 08:47 PM
My husband and I are going to try and see Sicko this weekend. Then I'm going to try to talk him into buying me an iPhone so I can read Nursing Voices while I'm at work.


MJ

NurseSean
06-29-2007, 11:28 PM
It is an amazing movie that everyone should see. I am shocked that ANY nurse out there is against the beliefs in this movie.

But, I'm not American, so I guess I don't understand where American nurses are coming from. To Canadians, socialized medicine seems like a no-brainer *shrug*

Sean

geenaRN
06-29-2007, 11:42 PM
Well Sean, what about all the horrible things we hear about people having to wait weeks for hip replacements and months for open heart surgery?

Do you read Dr. Crippen's blog? Almost every day he has another example of why the NHS sucks.

I've read articles written by people who were diagnosed with rare conditions and were unable to get the only treatment they could because it was too expensive for the NHS.

What's so great about socialized medicine? That it's "free?" No, not quite. Sure, you don't have to pay a co-pay at the door or at the pharmacy, but your taxes end up paying for it.

Not trying to be argumentative (ok, maybe a little :)) but I would truly love to be convinced and since it's a "no-brainer" to ya'll Canadians, please enlighten me!!

Julie
06-30-2007, 04:32 AM
I think like any system 'social medicine' has its good and bad points. Yes you will find the examples of people waiting too long for treatment, for people being denied free, but expensive treatments. But at the same time, what you don't hear is that almost no one waits months for a hip replacement now, that by next December no one should wait more than 18 weeks for definitive treatment for any condition and that there are people out there receiving very expensive treatments at no cost to themselves. It is right in this kind of system that questions are asked about the validity, effectiveness and yes cost of something which ultimately will take money from other people.

Having said anything I don't know anything about htis particular movie!

NurseSean
06-30-2007, 07:31 AM
Well Sean, what about all the horrible things we hear about people having to wait weeks for hip replacements and months for open heart surgery?!

I won't deny that there are some negatives. Wait times are a big issue here, but these are mainly for non-urgent procedures. I feel that the good of our system far outweighs the bad. Like anything, you hear the horror stories, rather than the typical. Bottom line is, if you're in trouble, you get care, stat! No questions asked. And nobody has to worry about being able to afford it.

And yes, the fact that it is free is what is so great about it.

Edit: Sorry, I missed the point that it is never free due to paing it all in taxes. It just takes a different belief system. We all pay a little more in taxes so that everyone can have equal health care. Afterall, we will all require it someday, and I'd rather have the peace of mind that it will be there for me. Plus, the amount we pay in taxes for health care is FAR less than equivelent medical insurance. And as Michael Moore shows, having insurance doesn't guarantee you will get health care. I know that won't be an issue here. Again, peace of mind.

Sean

MyOwnWoman
06-30-2007, 11:41 PM
I just got home from watching "Sicko" in the theatre. I think that every person in the USA should have to watch it just as an "fyi" kind of thing. I know some of the things mentioned in the movie are truths....truths I know from a personal perspective. I have to maul this movie around in my head a little more before I write on it. I'm sure in the next few days I will post some words of wisdom about National Health Care on my blog (if any of you read my blog). I just have to figure out how much of what Michael Moore presented that I actually believe.

I'm just babbling....and I so hate it when I babble.

geenaRN
07-01-2007, 01:03 AM
Thanks, Sean, for your take on it. It's nice reading another perspective.

I guess I'll have to go see it before I comment further!

Mother Jones, RN
07-01-2007, 06:21 PM
Here's my review of Sicko, but first, I must post this a disclaimer: I am a card carrying, tree-hugging liberal who hates all politicians who are in back pocket of Haliburton and HMOs. Itís not my intent to offend anyone, but Iím sure that Iíll offend people who think that Fox News is a refreshing source of fair and balanced information.

Sicko, Michael Mooreís movie about our failing health care system, is a standup and cheer movie for anyone who has been screwed over by his or her health insurance company, meaning that millions of people are going to really love this movie. Moore accurately portrayals the HMOs as a bunch of crooked, bloodthirsty companies that would rather see patients die before paying out expensive claims. Nurses see this kind of stuff everyday, and it sickens us.

Moore talks about socialized medicine. Many people point out that patients must wait for medical procedures that they need under a socialized medical system. Maybe thatís true for non-emergent cases, but unlike our system, at least patients eventually get the care that they need while needy Americans ultimately are denied care by their insurance companies. There is an old saying that goes ďfigures donít lie but liars figure,Ē and insurance company executives are the most over paid bunch of liars and thieves on the planet. HMOs hire people who look for ways to deny claims and to screw patients over. Thatís how HMOs can afford to pay their CEOs those huge yearly paychecks. There is no perfect system, but I have problem with a system that protects greedy insurance companies while inviting patients to rollover and literally die. I encourage everyone to see this movie.

That is all.

MyOwnWoman
07-01-2007, 10:20 PM
Very well said Mother Jones, I couldn't have said it better myself.

If we want to be realistic about things, we in America have to wait for medical services as well as they do in other countries that offer NHS. How long have any of you waited to get into see a dermatologst, or an endocrinologist...or even your own PCP?

We all wait, from what I can see, and I may not know the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth about NHS, at least the NHS eventually gives health care. We get letters stamped with names from some CEO who has never physically seen me with the word "DENIED" stamped on it.

I guess it's a supply and demand issue. We supply the money, they might think about supplying the service.

Working Girl
07-03-2007, 10:06 PM
I thought the movie was great. I'm a US citizen living in the US. Several years ago, while traveling in the UK, I developed a really bad case of N/V/D. I got really dehydrated. I went to a hospital. I waited for 20 minutes before I was seen by a doctor. I was admitted, given IV fluids and monitored overnight. The fluids were all I needed to put me on the right track. Last month I fell in the dark parking lot of the hospital in which I work as I was leaving after a call shift. I waited in the emergency room for 3+ hours and was treated incredibly rudely until I mentioned that I was an employee. (I have to wear hospital laundered scrubs, so I was already in street clothes when I fell)

By the time I can go back to work, I will have used all the vacation time I've been saving (for a now imaginary trip to India). I wish I was French.

KimRN
07-04-2007, 07:31 PM
Haven't seen it yet. Aside from the subject matter, I heard it is very funny. Michael Moore is not my cup of tea, but in this case I think I can watch the movie with an open mind.

Have to wait until my next day off!

kate loving shenk
07-05-2007, 02:38 PM
Hello all--

Sicko is a great film. Probably will win an academy award.

Having said that, i was saddened by the movie, more notably by the feeling that health care reform is moving so slowing in this country, it may as well not be moving at all.

When health care workers were asked about whether anyone in france, canada or the uk would change their system for ours, they just laughed.

And the health care workers in these countries said they could never work for a system such as ours where profit is a higher priority than human life.

But we can get involved. The California Nurses Association is a good place to start. They have a bill called: Guaranteed Health Care for all. Just google it.

Where I practice in Pennsylvania, we have a single payer plan about to be introduced to the house.

Sicko has put all of this on the radar screen.

What a beautiful thing!!

Kate Loving Shenk
Nursing Career Transformation (http://www.nursingcareertransformation.com)
http://nursehealers.typepad.com

P.S. Thanks for this forum!!

Mother Jones, RN
07-05-2007, 05:01 PM
Kim, I can't wait to read your post about Sicko after your next day off.

geenaRN
07-06-2007, 10:48 AM
You can read mine now! It's attached to an article I wrote for NursingLink, but if you click the link in the first sentence, you can read just my review (http://www.codeblog.com/archives/the_scoop/what_the_internet_is_saying_ab.html).

kate loving shenk
07-07-2007, 08:03 PM
hello all--

i watched sicko with a retired physician yesterday--he loved it so much that he didn't want it to end, and kept sitting there almost in a state of shock, after the movie ended!!

this time around, i saw the utter brilliance of this film. the editing was flawless, the movie was funnier than i remembered (i needed a straight jacket the first time i saw it and sought counseling to get myself back together!!!)

my physician friend and i went out to eat, and discussed it for hours.

wow!!

all i know is: the insurance industry has to go. it is too corrupt to fix in any way.

i knew this going into the movie--and moore's point about americans needing to think in terms of "WE" instead of "ME" is well taken.

i am a moore fan and have been for years. i met him at the Democratic National Convention in 1992 (I was on the Crudentials Committee) in NYC and we all had a great time.

i hung out with him and loved his energy. just a very fun loving and happy guy--not the angry person some people make him out to be.

well 1992 was a long time ago--maybe he's good and angry now!!! LOLOL!!

i know something has to be done

we have a single payer bill now here in pennsylvania that we are gathering petition signatures for, now.

for those of you in PA, here's the link to get the petition.

http://www.healthcare4allpa.org/filmkit.htm (http://www.healthcare4allpa.org/filmkit.htm)

enough from me--hope all is well --

Christopher Dallman
07-11-2007, 01:47 PM
I've got to wait until it gets shown in Scotland. :(
I certainly wouldn't want to swap the NHS with all its faults, and by golly it has them, whatever Michael Moore may have glossed over, for the American system.

Elocin22
07-17-2007, 05:58 AM
Ok. So I saw Sicko tonight. I went in to it with mixed feelings, primarily in regards to putting money into Michael Moore's pocket. I knew that it would be one-sided and engage in a little overkill here and there. (And I hope that someday, he will know that a "documentary" should portray both sides of the story.)That having been said, I knew I would be presented with information that made me think. That is his goal: to make us think. Whether we act upon it or not, that's our problem.

(And now for the disclaimer: These are soley random thoughts. I truly believe bits of it, and others I'm just thinking out loud.)

The stories of the people are incredibly sad. I and my family have been fortunate enough to not have problems w/ insurance. I was sitting there thinking, "This shouldn't ever be a problem for me, because I work at a hospital." And then the lady from a hospital, located not too far from the one I work at (too close for comfort), whose husband died because he was denied care. That stopped that thought in it's tracks. I guess it can apply to me! (Holy Beans!)

I do agree that everyone deserves to have QUALITY health care, and that it must come at a cost. However, America is a free market economy. That's the premise our country was founded on. We're here to make money and not be directed, completely, by the government. It's very difficult for me to decide where I stand on the issue because of this. I think everyone should have a minimum standard of care to be received, but anything above and beyond, I'm just not sure. (Oh, of course I want everyone to get every treatment possible if it's going to fix them! Duh!) So do we all pitch in a bit, so everyone can have the same basic care? Maybe the same basic PREVENTIVE CARE? Wouldn't that solve a lot of things? Prevent a lot of unnecessary hospitalizations, surgeries, deaths?

(As my boyfried said, Michael Moore depends on capitalism to get the hype and the income from this movie...he probably wouldn't have produced it or any of his other movies if he didn't stand to gain something from it. Is it so bad for other American institutions to want to have some gains? Not that I'm supporting a million dollar income at the expense of someone's life...)

Geena: I totally had the exact same question. How far is too far on someone's life in a socialist, national health care plan? Does that mean we resuscitate them over and over and over, knowing full well that their quality of life is forever compromised? Does that mean we go ahead and do a CABG on a 90 year old man and take him back to surgery three times, but withdraw treatment on a 40 year old woman after one round of chemo? Is that why there are so many palliative care initiatives in foreign countries, because they're killing their people off because they can't afford them? I'm curious to know how many pt's like Terri Schiavo they have in their long term care facilities... Do they dump them ASAP or do they prolong the inevitable?

The things that totally irritated me throughout the movie:
1. If he really felt that national health care is that important, wouldn't he move to a country where it is the standard?

2. Everyone who bought tickets to the show will have just paid his medical bill for his stents and maybe a CABG that he's bound to have in the future. (Again, preventive health care!)

3. Um, was it just me or is it kind of ridiculous to ask an ENGINEER if he's living comfortably in any economy? Seriously, if you're checking up on the "cost" of socialized medicine, don't you think you should ask maybe a grocery store worker or someone who having a lot less income in addition to high taxes might be more affected?

4. Don't make me feel guilty for wanting what's best for me and no one else. (Admit it, you all felt this! We're Americans! Our society is built on dollar signs and the "me" attitude.) I don't necessarily agree...it was more a gut reaction. I think a little attitude change would be great. Let's look at it as "philanthropy."

5. His dirty clothes bit was just dumb, as was his lame-assed attempt at Guantanamo Bay. I know it was to drive home a point, but sometimes one just needs to grow up.

I don't know. I'm still ruminating on it...well, that actually may just be the tasty veggie creole and bread pudding I had before we went...haha. I may be back to comment. These are my thoughts for now though.


Ah, one more thing. What has this movie prompted you to do? After all, I said it's up to us to actually do something in regards to those things that make us think and that we feel passionate about.

I know the town I live in has two low cost/free health clinics and a team in the county health department that does immunizations and health education. My new goal is to become involved in them. If we can't change the system from the top, we can at least make a difference at our level. Perhaps it will trickle up, haha.

Marachne
07-17-2007, 03:18 PM
First caveat: I have not yet seen Sicko.

Second caveat: Like MJ I'm a card-carrying leftie.

Third caveat: I like a lot of what Michael Moore does. Yes, he engages in hyperbole and overkill, and he can be a little sloppy with his facts, but the reality is that he also lives in America where anything less than overkill gets ignored. I do think he's gotten a little bit over in love with himself and puts too much of himself in his movies, but that doesn't stop him from presenting really important information and ideas.

That said, I want to respond to some of what Elocin22 said:

I hope that someday, he will know that a "documentary" should portray both sides of the story.

Nope, anyone who says that their treatment of a subject is "equal fair and balanced" is about as honest as...Fox news. There is nothing that says a documentary has to present "both sides." For one thing, most issues have more than two sides. For another, everything we produce has a point of view. For a third, these movies fall into the category of "Political Documentaries." There's even a new book about it: http://www.amazon.com/Shooting-Truth-American-Political-Documentaries/dp/0275987604

I do agree that everyone deserves to have QUALITY health care, and that it must come at a cost. However, America is a free market economy. That's the premise our country was founded on. We're here to make money and not be directed, completely, by the government.

Again, I think that's an overstatement. There have been tensions from the beginning about the role of government (the federalists vs. the state's rights folks among the founding fathers). And that argument was also used to support slavery. We, as a nation can, and in some cases must change if we are going to survive. Having 5% of the country contoling 95% of the wealth is not something I want to perpetuate.

As for everyone getting preventive care, did you know that Bush recently said "everyone has access to care, they have the emergency room." Great, caring attitude. And I won't talk about my insurance company which, for the plan I'm on pays for ONE HOUR of diabetic education in one's entire life! They'll (theoretically) cover the amputations, the dialysis, the medications for diabetic neurapathy, but not simple education.

(As my boyfried said, Michael Moore depends on capitalism to get the hype and the income from this movie...he probably wouldn't have produced it or any of his other movies if he didn't stand to gain something from it.

I don't know how much MM is into money and fame these days, I think it has gone to his head. But his first movie "Roger and Me" about the loss of auto manufacturing jobs in his hometown Flint, Michigan was made from a place of outrage towards the filthy rich who don't give a hoot about how many people's lives they destroy. He's been making documentaries for a long time (Roger and Me was made in 1989) and he's only really started to make it in a mainstream way since "Bowling for Columbine" in 2002. I think outrage, and being outragous really is his mode of operation. He really does fight for things that affect the everyday person with little or no political, social, or economic power.

I think the questions about what is broken in our system, in terms of fruitless procedures is a good one. I also know that the UK, Australia and Sweden, all countries with socialized medicine, do some of the best work regarding palliative and hospice care and research, as well as looking at issues of aging and long-term care. I don't think people get "dumped" (although I'm not saying their systems are perfect), but they maybe get more appropriate care rather than "anything money can buy" (if you have the money).

Just another thought--the VA is the largest healthcare system in the US--and it is in essence socialized medicine. I also just read that that number we always hear as a comparison: wait time for hip fractures? Guess who pays for the majority of hip replacements in the US? Medicare--i.e. socialized medicine.

The fact that we are at the bottom of ranking for health care in developed countries says a lot to me too.



1. If he really felt that national health care is that important, wouldn't he move to a country where it is the standard?

Uh, because he loves his country and wants to make it a better place? I'm sorry but I've been hearing that argument since the Viet Nam era, and it makes no more sense now then it did then. Why should I leave instead of fighting for change that I think will improve the home I love?

2. Everyone who bought tickets to the show will have just paid his medical bill for his stents and maybe a CABG that he's bound to have in the future. (Again, preventive health care!)

Some might call that statement sizest or fat phobic. It is possible to be big and healthy, just as it is possible to be a top athlete and have a heart attack. That seems to me like a kind of low blow. But YMMV

3. Um, was it just me or is it kind of ridiculous to ask an ENGINEER if he's living comfortably in any economy? Seriously, if you're checking up on the "cost" of socialized medicine, don't you think you should ask maybe a grocery store worker or someone who having a lot less income in addition to high taxes might be more affected?

Ah, but that's the thing, the engineer IS paying more taxes, unlike in the US where the people who can afford it the least pay (proportionately) a lot more in taxes.

I don't know. I'm still ruminating on it...well, that actually may just be the tasty veggie creole and bread pudding I had before we went...haha. I may be back to comment. These are my thoughts for now though.

mmmm yum. Want to share? :D I want to say that I appreciate your sharing your thoughts, and I hope that my sharing my responses will be taken in the spirit it is given--that of good, public, debate, one of the things that I think our country is founded on.


Ah, one more thing. What has this movie prompted you to do? After all, I said it's up to us to actually do something in regards to those things that make us think and that we feel passionate about.

you have a really good point there. What I'm doing is trying to help out family caregivers through my research, as well as vulnerable older adults in general. As we discharge people "sicker and quicker" we ask more and more of family members in terms of care--from complex dressing changes to pain management...not to mention just having to negotiate our health system. (Another aside--in the UK, and I believe some of the other socialized medicine countries they also pay family caregivers so that they don't wind up loosing jobs, homes, etc when a family member becomes ill or has a chronic illness/disability). I'm also working with the local GLBT older adult organization around healthcare issues.

That said, I probably don't do enough.

I know the town I live in has two low cost/free health clinics and a team in the county health department that does immunizations and health education. My new goal is to become involved in them. If we can't change the system from the top, we can at least make a difference at our level. Perhaps it will trickle up, haha.

Good on you. I think that is part of the solution -- to not feel helpless and w/o power but to act and empower ourselves. I think one can both act locally and respond politically on the larger stage. I think the office of the National Nurse is a step towards the kind of advocacy work that is the heart of what nursing is about.

Wow, it's amazing what lengths I will go to to avoid studying for my comprehensive exams! :eek:

kate loving shenk
07-23-2007, 02:49 PM
Hello all,

Here is my latest article (http://www.submityourarticle.com/articles/Kate%20Loving-Shenk-1513/nurse-healers-17531.php) on single-payer health care for all Americans.

In-Joy!!

kate loving shenk
07-25-2007, 07:53 PM
hi all--

check out this web site (http://progressives4pennsylvania.com) and read the various (excellent) articles on single-payer health care.

Progressives For Pennsylvania is a group i belong to where we relentlessly tackle grassroots issues, such as health care reform,
environmental concerns, impeachment (a waste of valuable energy, in my opinion), and who to support in the upcoming presidental race.

Check it out. (http://progressives4pennsylvania.com)

KimRN
09-07-2007, 09:25 AM
Hi Kate!

I've been meaning to tell you I love your pic - it's nice seeing a face with the name!

You know, there was a HUGE push for SICKO here in CA and my initial plan was to see it when it first came out so that I could be in on the debate it was sure to bring on.

It sort of fizzled! I have hardly read anything on it, and I haven't even seen it yet, although I plan to.

Not sure what happened. Was it so off the wall it said nothing, or was it so on target that everyone already was on board with what it had to say?

Still plan to see it, either way.

jojodow
09-08-2007, 03:41 PM
It's sad. I think I would actually go see the film if Michael Moore had nothing to do with it. I can't stand the man.

My view is if you can't stand something about our Government, quit whining and do something about it.That means Lobby congress, write letters, start a charitible organization. Making a one-sided movie about how our Government sucks doesn't count. And that applies to all Moore's movies. In fact, I would have a lot more respect if 100% of the proceeds from that film went to people in the US needing Healthcare.

As far as our HCS goes, I agree, It is flawed. But we really do need to take responsibility for ourselves. There's too many people in the US who will pay 300-500 a month on Entertainment, Cable or satellite, nights out at the bars, DVR, but won't use that money for their own healthcare.

I worked at the City Hospital and witnessed everyday, the homelesss getting better healthcare then my mother or sister (who are both uninsured by the way). When the homeless people got better and our social workers gave them a plethera of resources, instead of wanting to go to the shelters or halfway homes, they CHOSE to walk out to the streets.
You can lead a horse to water....but can't make it drink.

I'll get more personal. This month, since I switched jobs I have no insurance for the month of Sept. Wouldn't you know it, my daughter had pink eye 2 days ago and had to go to the doctor. I did what I had to do and paid out of pocket...for the visit and the antibiotics.

That means no going out to dinner or movies for the next month for us but Ari's health takes precedence over that stuff.

Just my opinion :boxing: :)

KimRN
09-09-2007, 07:09 AM
hi all--

check out this web site (http://progressives4pennsylvania.com) and read the various (excellent) articles on single-payer health care.

Progressives For Pennsylvania is a group i belong to where we relentlessly tackle grassroots issues, such as health care reform,
environmental concerns, impeachment (a waste of valuable energy, in my opinion), and who to support in the upcoming presidental race.

Check it out. (http://progressives4pennsylvania.com)

I don't get much into politics, but CNA has partnered with Physicians for a National Health Plan (http://pnhp.org/) and it really is the one plan I can totally be on board with.

It includes a tax - the same tax across the board for all incomes, with employers also paying a tax for each employee. But...it isn't run by the government, it is run by local boards and you are free to see who you want, when you want.

Nursing salaries are a huge part of the hospital budgets and all raises or contracts are unaffected (I asked!)

I never thought I'd find a proposal I could get behind, but I did! So now I'll have a Pepsi! :pepsi:

Any excuse for that emoticon! :nurse:

jojodow
09-16-2007, 04:01 AM
Kim,

I just read most of that site and actually, I think it sounds like a good deal!

It would probably be chaotic and screwy at first but once it lifts off it could be a really good thing for this country.

Let me add to what I said about taking responsibility. Helping congress pass that bill would be taking responsibility for ourselves and those less fortunate.

I wrote a letter to my Rep :proud:

PixelRN
09-17-2007, 08:49 AM
I haven't seen it. I don't really care for Moore's style. It seems like the hype has really died down surrounding the issue of universal healthcare but hopefully it will stay around as a topic for debate as the presidential election draws closer.

kate loving shenk
11-20-2007, 11:39 AM
Hello all--

I haven't posted for awhile but now intend to write more regularly.

DFA (Democracy For America) held Sicko parties all across America one week ago tomorrow!!

Boy was that fun!!

My local political activist group, called P4P (Progressives 4 Pennsylvania) sponsored the DFA viewing.

Labor union representatives, old home town liberals, and several people whom I never met--about 25 of us--were in attendance.

P4P is dedicated to bringing Pennsylvania's Single Payer Health care bill to fruition--(HB 1660). Gov Rendell is on the record as saying he would sign such a bill.

Michael Moore shows up in Sicko long after the film starts--for those of you who dislike him--and he plays Devil's Advocate through out--definitely Moore's best films to date--my third time seeing it.

So we as a group--P4P--plan to create workshops and present educational sessions about HB 1660 to Seniors, Labor Union people, and then anyone else who is interested.

This political year will be very exciting. Sicko has added to the excitement.

Health Care is in crisis. So from this standpoint, Now is the time to get involved!!!!!

Fasten your seatbelts!!! LOLOL

Mr Ian
11-23-2007, 05:24 AM
It's the ultimate price of capitalism - the have's and the have nots.

I'm not against free enterprise, or private health care and I even admire the American Dream (tho someone has to lose for your gain). Neither am I a total socialist. However, in this day when we scream and stomp over the inequalities that happen in underprivileged areas and then rally in the troops to go sort them out (another Moore topic), why is it so hard to look to your own neighbour and say "hey mate, here's my contribution to the next generation".

John Q was an awesome movie. Who can't be moved by the idea that a child could die, not because there isn't a cure but because the 'cost' of treatment isn't covered? That is a ruthless, inhumane and immoral way to exist.

In the UK there has been private and 'free' health care available for some time. Everyone contributes to the free health care service. Those who can afford it take up private health care too. (A lot of politicians actually say they do this to ease the pressure on the NHS - I love spin). Quite frankly, I don't care what 'other' system we have as long as there's a free health care service available for the whole population.

All in all - the NHS is one of the last testaments of a time where people cared for each other. Remember, it came about in the era of World War II and that event in itself bolstered the solidarity between people of all ages, religion, races and colours for the UK.

The rhetoric we hear time and time again about world peace, ending poverty, crisis aid and feed the world is absolute meaningless kak when we can't 'spare a dime' for the ailing man next door.

I'm happy to pay my taxes to pay for free health care - and I really don't care if it goes to someone else. We share the same planet.

Not seen the film. Have seen the reality.

P/J
11-25-2007, 07:26 AM
To say that you will not see the film because you don't like Mike Moore is stupid. You are not being ask to agree with him but don't you think you might learn/understand/see another side, by going to see the movie, if you walk out saying you disagree the most you have lost is an hour and $7, if you agree then the most you have lost is an hour and $7 too, but you have learned something either way (and it was good down time).

I have always been used to the fact that if I was sick all I had to do was ring a doctor's sugary and make an appointment or just turn up, this could be any doctor anywhere. It would be free to me (A$25 to non-residents). If I was hit by a car and had to go to hospital it is free, I am covered for ambulance treatment for A$60 a year, no matter where I go in Australia (this includes being air lifted off a mountain) and I can be taken to the closest hospital no matter who runs it.

I can't believe that people have to ring a company before getting transported to a hospital because they might not be covered for the ambulance and the hospital visit.

Its time to get informed.