View Full Version : new nursing student says hi!


obrien1984
02-05-2008, 03:50 PM
Hi, everyone. I just found this site after searching the web for encouragement. I was just admitted to a BSN "fast track" program, and now I have to decide whether I'm actually going to go through with it!

One of my biggest fears, especially after reading posts on this forum, is that I will be one of "those" nurses. You know, one who makes stupid mistakes, does not communicate well, makes everyone's life difficult, is inept, or hurts a patient. I fear that, no matter how hard I study, I simply won't have what it takes. I think I feel this way now because there is SO much to learn over the next two years. I don't even have the vocabulary to articulate my concerns about nursing.

Did you feel adequately prepared in school to be a nurse? I'm particularly interested in hearing from those of you who changed careers to be a nurse (I'm in IT right now).

Thanks so much for reading this. I'll check back often.

Joseph

Mother Jones, RN
02-05-2008, 05:17 PM
One of my biggest fears, especially after reading posts on this forum, is that I will be one of "those" nurses. You know, one who makes stupid mistakes, does not communicate well, makes everyone's life difficult, is inept, or hurts a patient. I fear that, no matter how hard I study, I simply won't have what it takes.

:nurse: Hi Joseph. Welcome to Nursing Voices. Trust me, your fears are normal, and we all had the same fears when we first started nursing school. Don't give up on nursing before you start going to school. Chin up, and report to class! :party:


Come back soon, and please keep us posted on your progress. :highfive:


MJ :pepsi:

miss-elaine-ious
02-05-2008, 09:13 PM
Hi Joseph!

As a nursing student completing my final term in the accelerated (fast track) nursing program, you'd be surprised what you can learn in that period of time!

You'll need to study, but the more immersed you are in nursing, the more you learn. Everything seemingly comes back quicker, because it was not that long ago that you learned it!

Take advantage of clinical time, as you will learn a lot about patient interaction. If you enjoy working with patients, you should enjoy nursing, even if you don't like nursing school!

I'm in the Emergency Department for my final rotation, and there's even more to learn once we're done nursing school (I'm studying all the time trying to stay on top of things, even though I dont' have any exams anymore except the nursing licensing exam!) But although I'm intimidated, I feel challenged.

Good luck with schooling, and there are so many opportunities for nurses out there, you'll find your niche.

Elaine
---------------
http://miss-elaine-ious.blogspot.com
:nurse:

P/J
02-05-2008, 10:41 PM
Hi Joseph
Congratulations, an exciting time for you. And welcome to Nursing Voices.

It might be easier for you just to fire questions when they arise at members, otherwise we can be typing for hours telling you our life stories.

Quickly, I trained as a Food Scientist so my first degree was in chemistry and microbiology. I worked for a number of food companies before changing to nursing. Most of my course (due to it being postgrad entry) are from other careers. Business, Arts, Music, Science, Tourism, Natropath. The main issue that people have had is; if they are from a science background, they have had problems with all the writing and essays that we write, when they are used to reports and such. The Arts/Business students have had trouble getting up to speed with the basic science, it is high school year 9 and 10 stuff (14year old and 15 year old) but they have either not paid much attention (thinking they were going into arts) or forgotten it. Do not worry about it though, you might just need some extra reading at the start.

Feel free to fire any questions or comments at us on the student board. :party:

PJ

Marachne
02-06-2008, 12:32 AM
Very quick story: multiple past careers (sign language interpreter, conference planner, office manager), long time getting BA thinking I'd go on for an MSW (masters of social work). Lots of things happen in between and I wind up (in my mid 40's) going back to school and through an accelerated program.

Some of the hardest stuff I've ever done (until I started my PhD that is).

Will you feel prepared to work when you come out of school? No. Noone does. That's why it really helps to look for a job that has a good orientation program (or better yet, a residency program) to help you get up to speed.

Everyone makes "stupid mistakes" it's what you do with the knowledge you gain from that. Communication is something you can have control over, as does "making everyone's life difficult." If you stay reflexive and aware of what you don't know, you have a good chance of not hurting a patient...except everyone makes mistakes. Again, the trick is that if you do do something wrong (or something that then causes a patient's situation to go wrong) you don't try and hide it, you let people know so that things can be rectified. Another way to look at is is that a lot of things we do in the course of "helping" patients can also do harm (think of chemotherapy!) What you can do is listen to your patients, talk to them like intelligent human beings (who just don't happen to know medical jargon) and advocate for them.

Good luck with your studies and your new path!

LesleyJoy
02-08-2008, 01:03 AM
...One of my biggest fears, especially after reading posts on this forum, is that I will be one of "those" nurses...

Joseph

Welcome, Joseph!

You are wise to be concerned about becoming a nurse in title but not in deed. May this very concern encourage you to find precisely your place in nursing!

As you may have already noted, there are many different areas of service within the broad discipline of nursing. From Nurse Informatics to psych nursing, from critical care to school nursing, from pediatric office nursing to inpatient oncology, from hospice to life flight, from long term care to orthopedics, the opportunities to provide superb care are numerous, scary, and really, really confusing to the nursing student.

So what should you do? Well, I say you should just jump right in! Begin and finish nursing school. Ace the NCLEX. And then begin the fascinating journey to find your place.

I hope you will return often to this forum. There are many here who will encourage you - and who will be encouraged by you.

Onward! The best is yet to come.

Joy