View Full Version : Pet Peeves


Mother Jones, RN
07-01-2007, 07:31 PM
It's hard being a charge nurse. Here are some of my pet peeves.

1) A nurse calls in sick on their weekend to work again.

2) The boss leaves a gapping hole in the staff schedule and tells you to deal with it as he/she is walking out the door for the night.

3) Doctors who dismiss my concerns about a patient because "I'm just a nurse."

4) Doctors who keep having problems with their beeper, and who refuse to call me back in a timely fashion.


What are some of your pet peeves? :mad:

geenaRN
07-02-2007, 06:26 PM
Staffing calling me 100 times a day for the stupidest things.

Shift Supervisors who don't move patients. Well, until ER has one to send us. THEN all of a sudden there are beds in the house!

Co-workers who can't compromise or get along with others.

Mother Jones, RN
07-02-2007, 09:29 PM
I forgot to mention supervisors who call me on my day off at 6 AM to see if I can come in at 7 AM to work the day shift.

Marachne
07-04-2007, 03:53 PM
Gaa. Try calling at 6:30 to fill a 6 a.m. slot--and I worked until 2300 the night before.

KimRN
07-04-2007, 06:10 PM
Nurses who spend their entire shift on the internet playing You Tube videos.

And no, that's not me! LOLOLOL!

Mother Jones, RN
07-05-2007, 04:53 PM
Kim, you're lucky. The nurses don't have access to the Internet at our hospital. They don't want us to waste time with "unproductive activities." Our hospital administrator doesn't understand that blogging is a very productive activity :D

geenaRN
07-06-2007, 01:36 AM
Not necessarily just related to charge, but I HATE it when an IV pump beeps, and a nurse goes into the room to take care of it but doesn't silence it while he/she is trying to fix whatever the problem is.

Or they're turning a patient when the tubing gets kinked and the pump needs to be re-started, but they just let it beeeeep beeeeep beeeep away.

It always makes other nurses have to stop what they're doing to go investigate the beeping, only to find that someone else is taking care of it already.

The silence button is not just your friend.. it's everyone's friend!

KimRN
07-06-2007, 10:20 PM
Not necessarily just related to charge, but I HATE it when an IV pump beeps, and a nurse goes into the room to take care of it but doesn't silence it while he/she is trying to fix whatever the problem is.

Or they're turning a patient when the tubing gets kinked and the pump needs to be re-started, but they just let it beeeeep beeeeep beeeep away.

It always makes other nurses have to stop what they're doing to go investigate the beeping, only to find that someone else is taking care of it already.

The silence button is not just your friend.. it's everyone's friend!

Too funny!:) In my unit we all seem to have different levels of "beep tolerance" - oh my, that's a post right there...gotta run and blog.....:eek:

MyOwnWoman
09-12-2007, 10:29 AM
Beep tolerance....what a wonderful phrase. I don't know if it's because I worked the ICU for so long and everything beeps there or that I just choose to tune things out but I have a very serious problem with beep tolerance. There are many times when I am standing right next to the beeping sound and I just "don't hear it." I can't tell you how many times I've been told by my peers who have come in to silence the IVAC machines, "What are you, deaf girl?"

But on the other hand, I can hear a monitor alarm or a ventilator alarm a mile away.

Polaris
09-30-2007, 07:27 PM
It drives me nuts when a nurse answers a call light at the desk, then goes to find someone else who can take care of it. Why not just do it yourself? It took them 10 minutes to track down a CNA to help someone to the toilet. They could have had the task done by that time.

Then they go back to the desk and pull out a magazine.

ARGH!

jojodow
10-01-2007, 10:07 PM
That happened to me waaaayyy too many times when I was a CNA.

I never did that to my CNAs as a nurse.

I did grow to have a beep tolerance though. I had to make a mental note to listen for an Antibiotic finishing for the beep because I literally couldn't hear them anymore. My brain just tuned them out.

Elocin22
10-02-2007, 01:28 PM
I have no "beep tolerance." I get really cranky when there are three nurses sitting at the desk in front of a room w/ a beeping pump and I have to walk from the other end of the unit to figure out where it's coming from. Come on people! Open your ears!



My other pet peeve is tape. Don't tape stuff up and then leave the tape on the wall when you pull it down. I know it shouldn't be that big of deal, but it just looks messy. (My friend bought me box cutters last year for Christmas for the sole purpose of scraping tape in my downtime. She loves me!)

neuronurse
10-02-2007, 06:31 PM
My newest pet peeve is one that is unique to me I think..I hate it when nurses are transferring a patient to a neuro floor and don't do a neuro exam....seems kind of simple huh? It seems to be happening a lot to me lately, I mean, come on, I look at more then my pt's neuro status, the least you can do is check out the basics :banghead:


P.S for tips on a neuro exam (wink wink) check out my blog
:party:

can you tell this has happened to me in the last few days :hahaha:

neuronurse
10-02-2007, 06:35 PM
Beep tolerance....what a wonderful phrase. I don't know if it's because I worked the ICU for so long and everything beeps there or that I just choose to tune things out but I have a very serious problem with beep tolerance. There are many times when I am standing right next to the beeping sound and I just "don't hear it." I can't tell you how many times I've been told by my peers who have come in to silence the IVAC machines, "What are you, deaf girl?"

But on the other hand, I can hear a monitor alarm or a ventilator alarm a mile away.


Everything that beeps on our unit has different pitches, so we've made up saying for the different beeps. The vent beeping says "I am mad" while the central ECG monitors say "I need attention now." it's pretty funny, then there is the low grade vent alarm that sounds like Chopin's Entertainer, so when that is beeping you'll see nursing singing the song....nights are fun on the unit to say the least

Burnout Hag RN
10-11-2007, 06:59 PM
Corporations buying out heath care facilities and tekkings docs how to practice medicine, nurses how to practice nursing, using /fnferior supplies because they are cheaper.
INSURANCE COMPANIES IN GENERAL
NURSES EATING THEIR YOUNG INSTEAD OF NURTURING THEMhttp://www.nursingvoices.com/images/smilies/eating.gif
BURNED OUT NURSES WHO REFUSE TO QUIThttp://www.nursingvoices.com/images/smilies/sleep.gif

Marachne
10-12-2007, 05:26 PM
Oooh, Burnout Hag RN, you touched a raw one with me -- how about private-equity firms buying nursing homes and care going in the toilet?

http://blogs.wsj.com/washwire/2007/10/02/lawmakers-investigate-buyouts-of-nursing-homes/

MyOwnWoman
10-13-2007, 01:07 AM
I guess I have a pet peeve too. It annoys me that some nurses with much less experience than I can take care of patients in such a fashion that they have time to make long personal phone calls, text message their friends and sit with their feet propped up on the chair next to them.

It doesn't annoy me that they do it; it just annoys me that I can't get my work done fast enough to do it too!:hmmmm:

jojodow
10-14-2007, 03:41 PM
MOW,

If they're able to do that...I'm willing to bet they're lacking somewhere..(ie. documentation,patient care, or teamwork)

If I saw that at work I know that Nurse is neglecting something.

Polaris
10-15-2007, 02:05 PM
Definitely lacking in teamwork. They should ask other if they need help.

On the flip side, others should ask them for help too.

If I see someone sitting with their feet propped up on the desk, texting their boyfriend, popping their bubblegum, and slurping down a double tall mocha cappucino I (politely of course - snort) let 'em know the guiac cards need stocked, the commodes need cleaned, and there is poop on the wall of the public bathroom.

RN started with CNA - we can all do the same tasks.

It irritates me when fellow RN's are not considerate of their team mates.

MyOwnWoman
10-16-2007, 12:44 AM
Amen Polaris!

nurseT66
11-06-2007, 07:55 PM
I am new to this but here are my 2 biggest pet peeves:
1. The "Super Nurse". You know, the one nurse who knows that everyone else on staff is not doing anything, who charts novels, knows more than anyone and likes to think that she (or he) is the nurse of all nurses.
2. The "Super Nurse" that passes the buck when she thinks the doctor needs to be called but won't do it herself.

I'm sure every hospital and LTC has one of these.

jmwquilter
11-12-2007, 06:13 PM
I am a fairly new nurse and know I may take longer than others to do things but...

Nurses who always seem to have time for one hour lunches and long phone calls with family.

Nurses who always take the easiest patients (two day post ops)

Nurses who complain non stop about everyone, the hospital, the management, etc.....

Nurses who never help the CNAs no matter how busy they are.

P/J
11-15-2007, 05:02 AM
The beep beep of an IMed machine when you are trying to fix it and it silences for a minute then starts again and you are trying to fix it and it won't work.

Patients that think that because you have put a pad on them (pull up or nappy/diaper) that they can just go in it instead of going to the toilet or calling the nurse.

Nurses that eat their young.

Nurses who bitch about patients during handover.

Nurses who pass the buck

Nurses who ask you why you did nursing as they don't like it.

PCAs hogging the linen (nurses need to make beds too, and I don't have time to run up and down the ward looking for a clean mac while you stand around talking to the other PCAs)

Pts who think that they are the only pt and should be attended to first ('No you were told that you could get up by yourself yesterday and have a wash, you do not need to be wheeled in on a komode chair')

THINGS THAT MAKE IT FUN!
Funny names on the nurse assignment board like: Spunky Sam, Naughty Natasha, Perfect PJ.
Chocolates from pts
Seeing your pts walk out with a grin on their faces after being wheeled in comatosed a month before.
The beep of an IMED.
Cheeky pts who sneek to the toilet when RIB and get stuck and have to call for you, and have a cheeky grin of their faces when you open the bathroom door.
Pts that appreciate that you are busy and they are one of 12 pts that you have today (between two nurses) and don't mind waiting for 15min for you to finish assisting them with their ADLs.

PixelRN
11-15-2007, 07:44 AM
Okay - this isn't really about nurses but could just apply to any hospital staff:

People WHO WALK TOO SLOW AND DON't GET OUT OF MY WAY.
People who don't make eye contact.

:banghead:

Mrs.Rollins
11-16-2007, 11:50 PM
People WHO WALK TOO SLOW AND DON't GET OUT OF MY WAY.





Heehee. I am also one of those people who is eternally flying down hallways. More than once I've been asked where the fire is.

KimRN
11-22-2007, 04:12 AM
Nurses who conveniently don't see the orders in the chart rack.

Nurses who surf the web all night (I do not!)

(Admission of guilt: I chart novels. Always have. I love to write. I was the only nurse excited that we weren't going to electronic medical records for another year. : o )

Marachne
12-01-2007, 06:07 PM
Kim,

Just curious, why would electronic records preclude you charting novels? Isn't there a free text option? Personally, I *like* our electronic system, because not only can I chart more faster (i'm a fast typist), but I don't have to worry about my very non-nurse-like poor penmanship. Furthermore, in our system (VA), we can not only chart as much as we want, but if we want to make sure someone sees the note, we make them a co-signer and they have to at least go to the note long enough to sign it -- maybe they'll read it too!

Mr Ian
12-02-2007, 10:02 AM
1. The "Super Nurse". You know, the one nurse who knows that everyone else on staff is not doing anything, who charts novels, knows more than anyone and likes to think that she (or he) is the nurse of all nurses.


That would be me. I am renowned as the unit 'novelist'... and I believe all the rest... at least where I am working now. :)

My pet peeves are people that leave insufficient records - and you have to chase up the whole story before you can actually make any use of it.

Mother Jones, RN
12-03-2007, 12:18 PM
Mr. Ian:

I got deposed by two lawyers during a lawsuit one time because my charting "read like a book." My charting saved the hospital's butt. Being the unit novelist can be a burden, but someone has to do it.

MJ:pepsi:

starkissed
12-03-2007, 06:36 PM
Nurses who leave a mess in the patient's room and having to clean up behind them constantly: such as dressing wrappers, needle caps, trash, etc.

Making first rounds to find out all the IVF needs new bags.

Manipulative patients who make it seem that no one does anything for them, that you are the 'only' one.

Coworkers who complain all of the time but do nothing to attempt to fix the things that they complain about.

ok, that's all for now.

Elocin22
12-03-2007, 10:27 PM
In the spirit of P/J: People who shuffle their feet, especially in flip-flops. PICK UP YOUR DAMN FEET!!!!

MyOwnWoman
12-06-2007, 10:22 PM
:banghead: A few of my pediatric parent pet peeves from an ER perspective.:banghead:

1. The parent who brings their child into the ER with a 104 temperature but did not give them Tylenol or Motrin because the child "wouldn't let me give it to him." Let me see, who is the child and who is the parent.

2. The parent who tells the ER nurse that the child has had a fever for the last week. When asked by the ER nurse exactly what the fever was they respond by saying, "I don't really know, all I know is that he's felt hot the last week but I didn't take his temperature."

3. The parent who brings their child to the hospital because he is "really sick" but won't allow the child to have blood work, Xrays or an IV because it's "too traumatic" for the child. Ok, I don't get it, what exactly do you want us to do for your child?

4. The parent who, despite the high fever, demands that the child be bundled up with heavy blankets for "his comfort." Ok, let's not worry about the fever rising to seizure point, as long as the child is comfortable in "your" eyes.

5. The parent who tells you her 14 year old daughter could not be pregnant because she's never had sex. "The pregnancy test must be wrong do it again." She tells you that straight faced as her daughter is laying on the bed with her boyfriend and she has "hickies" all over her neck. Hmmm....maybe the way they are cuddling in front of you might give you a clue as to what they do when they are alone.

6. The parent who feeds their child McDonald's in the ER despite the fact that you have asked them not to feed their child anything because they came in with abdominal pain and we have to determine what the problem is. That also goes for the child who vomits everything he eats........well....don't feed him right now. Come on, it's not rocket science.

7. My all time favorite. The parent who KNOWS the buzz words to use to get back in the ER right away and get a weekend babysitter for free. What words might those be? "I think my baby stopped breathing." Yep.......ding ding ding....we have a winner right here folks. Drop the baby off early Friday afternoon and disappear until Monday morning.

Mother Jones, RN
12-07-2007, 12:44 PM
How can a parent not know if their baby had stopped breathing? Wouldn't the blue skin color tip them off? WTF????? And honey, let me tell you, if my baby had stopped breathing, there is no way in hell I'd leave my child's bedside. The nurses would have to call the National Guard to escort me out of the hospital.

Your list cracked me up, but sadly, everything on that list is true.

MJ :pepsi:

storknurse05
12-28-2007, 11:44 AM
Nurses who don't restock the basics before going off shift...(IUPC, FSE, IV fluid)

Nurses who wait until the shift schedule is done to call in sick (usually about 1 hour before start of shift).

Gaping holes in the schedule including no one on the next shift to do charge, so I have to work a double to do it (on the weekend).

Nurses who come go into my patient's room and change things without telling me (like turning down my pitocin or increasing IVF rate)...just call me to notify.

Patients who come to the hospital for a labor check and bring every person they've ever known...bonus points for showing up in an ambulance and all the visitors get there before you do (I did a huge post on my blog about this very topic)

Labor support who will not do ANYTHING for the patient...drinks especially (when they'll get themselves a drink, but not her)

#1 pet peeve on my unit. We get a certain amount of "bag lunches" for patients overnight so that when they deliver we have some food for them. I HATE when nurses eat the lunches because they "forgot" something or "were running late". I hate when patient's boyfriends or friends steal them all...but I think it's more dispicable (sp?) when RNs steal them because they know better that we don't get any more....:nurse:

KimRN
12-28-2007, 02:23 PM
Oh man, I have one really big pet peeve and it isn't even that hard to do: if you use the last of something, get it replaced!

MyOwnWoman
12-31-2007, 04:02 PM
Marachne~
What type of electronic medical records do you use?...and does it interface with some of the doctor's offices?

Marachne
12-31-2007, 06:19 PM
Marachne~
What type of electronic medical records do you use?...and does it interface with some of the doctor's offices?


The VA (Veteran's Administration). We use a system called CPRS. It links all VA records, so VA clinics, consultations, etc are all available, including from other parts of the VA system (I know we can get records within the "Visin" or region, I imagine its possible to get to records from anywhere in the country. The pt records also records inpatient drug administration, and cross tracks pain assessments (0-10 scale) from the electronic medication system. Nice when you're trying to figure out patterns of PRN usage -- in general, only nurses use both BCMA (the medication system) and CPRS. Anyone else though: pharmacy, physicicans, therapists, etc can see medication use (and time of dosing -- or at least when it was scanned for administration).

The system has templates that can (should for some things) be used, but you can also free text to your hearts content. Labs and imaging reports brought into the note too. It's a really good system.

KimRN
01-03-2008, 02:05 PM
The system has templates that can (should for some things) be used, but you can also free text to your hearts content. Labs and imaging reports brought into the note too. It's a really good system.

I live for charting - any system that lets me free text would be heaven! Maybe I should check out the local VA!

Marachne
01-03-2008, 02:47 PM
I live for charting - any system that lets me free text would be heaven! Maybe I should check out the local VA!

I don't know about SF VA. I know Palo Alto has a great palliative & hospice unit, but not much else about it.

I love working at the VA because I so enjoy working with our veterans. I also like working in a place where the culture is so much one of respect--in general, we do feel like it is a honor to care for those who served (and this is coming from a multi-generational lefty radical type). The pay doesn't tend to be the highest in an area, but they do survey and provide a competitive wage. The benefits tend to be really good -- 13 holidays, very generous vacation and sick leave. Union shop. And working for what is, in essence, socialized medicine means you don't have to go through 30,000 hoops to get appropriate care. Also, once you're in the system, you can transfer to any VA and keep all of your accumulated sick/vacation/pension. You don't even need to get a local nursing license -- any state license will do, as you're on federal property! And yes, I think the record system is really good. Our medication management system was invented by a nurse, and has proven to cut down on medication errors. If you work in LTC, it is so far removed from any private (or even not-for-profit) facility -- you NEVER have to worry about running out of supplies, because the facilities are often directly tied to the hospitals, and the hospital's are teaching hospitals, you have providers available 5 days/week, rounding on patients, geriatric and other specialized fellows, etc. At our facility, while x-ray, lab, and pharmacy are only open on-site during business hours, we have 24hr access to the hospital services.

Downsides? You have to learn a whole new language in terms of acronyms and military-speak. It's a huge bureaucracy which can be a total PITA. As I said, you can probably get paid better elsewhere in the area. And for me, the great irony is that I work for the one medical system in the area that doesn't provide domestic partner benefits.

Marachne
01-03-2008, 02:47 PM
I live for charting - any system that lets me free text would be heaven! Maybe I should check out the local VA!

I don't know about SF VA. I know Palo Alto has a great palliative & hospice unit, but not much else about it.

I love working at the VA because I so enjoy working with our veterans. I also like working in a place where the culture is so much one of respect--in general, we do feel like it is a honor to care for those who served (and this is coming from a multi-generational lefty radical type). The pay doesn't tend to be the highest in an area, but they do survey and provide a competitive wage. The benefits tend to be really good -- 13 holidays, very generous vacation and sick leave. Union shop. And working for what is, in essence, socialized medicine means you don't have to go through 30,000 hoops to get appropriate care. Also, once you're in the system, you can transfer to any VA and keep all of your accumulated sick/vacation/pension. Double-time for holidays. You don't even need to get a local nursing license -- any state license will do, as you're on federal property! And yes, I think the record system is really good. Our medication management system was invented by a nurse, and has proven to cut down on medication errors. If you work in LTC, it is so far removed from any private (or even not-for-profit) facility -- you NEVER have to worry about running out of supplies, because the facilities are often directly tied to the hospitals, and the hospital's are teaching hospitals, you have providers available 5 days/week, rounding on patients, geriatric and other specialized fellows, etc. At our facility, while x-ray, lab, and pharmacy are only open on-site during business hours, we have 24hr access to the hospital services.

Downsides? You have to learn a whole new language in terms of acronyms and military-speak. It's a huge bureaucracy which can be a total PITA. As I said, you can probably get paid better elsewhere in the area. And for me, the great irony is that I work for the one medical system in the area that doesn't provide domestic partner benefits.

heatherhoney
01-12-2008, 07:40 PM
YEAH POLARIS! YEAH YEAH YEAH

texasnurse07
01-12-2008, 10:44 PM
My pet peeve....surgeons performing surgeries on patients and there are no rooms to put them in. It got so bad a couple of weeks ago, that the whole recovery unit was full to capacity with patients that had been there for days because they had no rooms.

Another peeve...nurses not keeping up with patient medications and then I have to get them caught up. Meaning the patient is getting their medications late. They are scheduled for a reason! Especially antibiotics.

Lastly, and probably the most bothersome....nurses leaving an IV bag hanging with 100cc or less left. Just change the darn bag out!

LesleyJoy
01-12-2008, 11:06 PM
...People WHO WALK TOO SLOW AND DON't GET OUT OF MY WAY...

:banghead:

WHEW! I just now read every word of all 5 pages... What a list of peeves, pet and otherwise! I must admit to standing on my own personal soap box on occasion and preaching about many of the same issues. Furthermore, I am grateful for everyone's participation in this thread because in the posts I have found implications of immense value: recognition of a solid work-ethic, upset secondary to management decisions, grief secondary to poor parental/patient choices, healthy job-related humor, and insight into personal behaviors and stressors! Thanks so much for giving me such rich content to consider.

I have quoted you, PixelRN, because I walk too slowly. I have been guilty of this ever since I hung up my EMS flight suit! Upon becoming a middle-management type I vowed to never again move more swiftly than a dignified amble. My pride in this was supported by numerous admiring comments I received from staff who stated they found comfort in my measured calmness. What they were not saying, however, was made utterly clear the day I moved very swifty indeed to care for a patient suddenly in extremis. When all the dust had settled, the charge RN very loudly remarked in front of God and everybody, "Joy! I did not know you could move so fast!"

I had enough grace to smile.

:creep:

Joy