View Full Version : Choosing to be a nurse


Alittlenurse
07-05-2007, 03:32 PM
Compu_nurse had a good question in the Inroductions post:
What made you decide to become a nurse?

It's a great question, because not only will it help non-nursing readers in choosing (or not choosing) this field BUT in nursing school, you get so bogged down with studies, and tests, and anxiety you forget (Well I do sometimes) what made you want to become a nurse in the first place.


So, I'll go first.
I had 2.5 years of college already (mostly the basic learning courses but was focusing toward English) when I met my husband. We soon became pregnant, and I had my son while on break from school. I had a hard labor and delivery and the nurses were so great and really rallied behind me, even pulling in other nursing sources to get that baby out. It was then I knew that this was what I wanted to do. I had no idea there were so many roles and so many areas I could focus in. That part was really just a bonus! :D

Anyone else care to share?

Julie
07-05-2007, 03:54 PM
My dolls were my patients, as were my brothers and any smaller children I could persuade to play my games. As soon as it was my turn to be patient I would call a halt; strange that! I read books about nurses and nursing and particularly loved Sue Barton. I always wanted to be a nurse and that was all I wanted to do. Strange then that I am not currently in clinical practice, though I still use my nursing skills and knowledge every day of my working life.

Nurse2Be?
07-06-2007, 12:41 AM
Do you ever feel that everyone asks you that question? My canned resonse is that I always wanted to do it and I like to help people. The whole story is that I also like science, technology and like to help people.... all od which seem to be availble in nursing. Also, the numerous career paths in nursing are are very attractive to me... I get bored so easily. In my late 20's I realized I had hit the ceiling in my profession and it was very likely that I would perform a similar role until I retired... yuck... So, here I am. Needless to say, I am not bored :)

compu_nurse
07-06-2007, 02:24 PM
I guess since I asked the question I should answer it too :)

It's kind of a long story but I'll try to make it short...I decided to go into Computer Science after high school because I had no idea what I wanted to do, I liked computers, and it was during the 'tech boom'. I had no big interest in the classes but figured it would get more interesting in my upper years, but before I knew it I had graduated into a field that I had no huge interest in.

It was a huge learning experience though...along the way I lost 50lbs, developed a huge interest in healthy living and realized I need a job where I can move around and help people. I decided to go back to school and take something I'm really interested in. I had an awesome meeting with the people in the Nursing faculty at my local university and read a whole bunch of Nursing blogs and books and decided it looks like the perfect fit! I'm registered for the 2 year accellerated program to start this Sept.

I have no idea what kind of Nurse I'd like to be, but I'm super excited!

geenaRN
07-06-2007, 03:45 PM
It helps to be excited, compu_nurse! My mom's a nurse and it just seemed like an interesting field to go into. Isn't that the lamest response ever? My mom suggested that I be a CNA first to see if I liked it and I did.

So I went to school and here I am.

compu_nurse
07-08-2007, 08:57 PM
It helps to be excited, compu_nurse! My mom's a nurse and it just seemed like an interesting field to go into. Isn't that the lamest response ever? My mom suggested that I be a CNA first to see if I liked it and I did.

So I went to school and here I am.

Haha...that's definitely not a lame response! Those are actually both things that got me into it too...my grandma and my aunt were both nurses, and there's so many different things you can do with a BN.

Jax
07-13-2007, 12:42 AM
What made me want to become a nurse?

I was a caregiver and got really annoyed that I couldn't do more to help people. Also I figured I needed a challenge (really hate academics). The fact that while I was frustrated I really did love my job, and I could never see myself sitting down at a desk all day.

Couldn't have done it without the support of my man though.

KimRN
09-07-2007, 09:35 AM
My dolls were my patients, as were my brothers and any smaller children I could persuade to play my games. As soon as it was my turn to be patient I would call a halt; strange that! I read books about nurses and nursing and particularly loved Sue Barton. I always wanted to be a nurse and that was all I wanted to do. Strange then that I am not currently in clinical practice, though I still use my nursing skills and knowledge every day of my working life.

Hey Julie, there are so many roles for nurses it's great. And just because you no longer practice clinically you are still making a contribution to the profession and the care of the patients. Bedside nursing may be the backbone of the profession but remember, there is a brain on top of that backbone that puts it all together!
Gee, I'm feeling literate today! :)

KimRN
09-07-2007, 09:39 AM
What made me want to become a nurse?

I was a caregiver and got really annoyed that I couldn't do more to help people. Also I figured I needed a challenge (really hate academics). The fact that while I was frustrated I really did love my job, and I could never see myself sitting down at a desk all day.

Couldn't have done it without the support of my man though.

I know it's really not said these days, but I really think nursing was a "calling" for me. I made the decision at the age of nine and never deviated from it. I joke that I wanted to wear Cherry Ames' cap, but something "hit" me on that front porch in 1966 and I made the decision not ever really knowing what a nurse really did.

There were times I wanted out of it so badly, but my life situation always kept me in the thick of it (aka: had to work!)and those bad times would pass.

Can't imagine being or doing anything else. It's like my identity. Of course, had I learned to play the guitar, or had any singing aptitude I may have been making albums, but that is another story!:)

Julie
09-07-2007, 10:33 AM
Hey Julie, there are so many roles for nurses it's great. And just because you no longer practice clinically you are still making a contribution to the profession and the care of the patients. Bedside nursing may be the backbone of the profession but remember, there is a brain on top of that backbone that puts it all together!
Gee, I'm feeling literate today!
__________________


You are so right, I know for a fact that I use my nursing knowledge and skills on a daily basis. Probably more than when I was practicing.

I hope you aren't peaking too soon today Kim!

Jess
09-15-2007, 12:25 PM
I know what you mean Nurse2Be?! Everyone asks me this question...instructors, professors, friends, family, etc. So why did I choose to go into nursing? There are so many reasons. One is that I know I will get a job when I graduate. I love to help others and nursing is something that's different. Every day is different and there are so many fields of nursing I can go into. ICU, ER, Renal, Cardiac, etc. I'm loving nursing so far and I'm really glad I chose nursing.

Caroline
09-16-2007, 03:14 PM
I wanted to be a nurse when I was little. When I was 8, I even wrote a letter to a nurse who was in the newspaper. I asked if she could "teach me" to be a nurse and told her I had $36. It was wild because they gave me an honorary nurse degree, a stethescope, and a lunch in my honor! Really cool for an 8 year old! (Oh, and the news did a piece on it, too!)

Then I got way off track. Got into theatre and went to college without so much as considering nursing. I was three years into a theatre degree when I switched to psychology and finished up.

I worked in corporate america for a few years and was absolutely miserable. It just wasn't the place for me, as much as I wanted it to be.

One day, my cousin announced that she was going to nursing school. Instead of happiness for her, I felt immensely jealous. So I re-examined those feelings and a year later, got accepted into an accelerated BSN where I'm now a 2nd semester student.

It's been a long road but I am really glad to be here!!!

Jess
09-16-2007, 04:33 PM
What a great story Caroline! I was in the hospital to get my tonsils out when I was in grade five and the nurses were absolutely amazing. I think that is a reason why nursing was on my mind when I applied to university. I still remember that week today! ;)

PixelRN
09-19-2007, 11:35 AM
Choosing to be a nurse was a very random thing for me. At 31 I had tried a plethora of careers and wasn't really stimulated by any of them. So on a whim I started pursuing my nursing degree. I guess I watched a lot of my friends become nurses and I've always admired and respected them the most.

Now that I am a nurse it almost seems like it was a "calling in reverse." I never felt like I was called to be a nurse but now that I am one it feels like I'm finally where I'm supposed to be.


:dancing:

jojodow
09-21-2007, 11:58 PM
I actually hated Hospitals when I was a kid. Always going to military hospitals with chronic ear infections (Tubes 3 times!) and allergy problems (Adenoids out twice! they grew back, and tonsils out). Military hospitals weren't kid friendly and it was awful. My mom usually had to drag me in literally kicking and screaming and I once even barricaded myself into a bathroom while there.

It wasn't until way after school and I spent a lot of time in and out of hospitals with my late husband that I thought Nursing would be a good fit for me. It has always been important to me that whatever I did in my profession had to be something that made a differance in someone else's life.:nurse:

Jess
09-23-2007, 12:27 PM
Awesome answer jojodow. I know some of my classmates have no clue why they chose nursing, but they just did and are very excited about it. Some people can just have a simple reason like "I like helping people." Others have more complex reasons but in the end, we're all going to be nurses. :D

miss-elaine-ious
10-12-2007, 03:12 AM
It's hard for me to say this, but I'm still not 100% sure nursing is for me. I see myself working hard in the health care system, but I have a hard time accepting my role as a nurse. I haven't enjoyed many of the clinical experiences I have had, although I do enjoy the tasks and helping people. I hope I don't get booed out of this forum for saying this!

I chose to do nursing school so I could get a job as an epidemiologist with a background in nursing. I'm starting to realize that I'm leaning more and more to the Emergency Department. I have experience with pre-hospital advanced first aid and I really love that, and have had some great trauma opportunities.

I'm still searching for a place for myself as a nurse. Perhaps you guys could help me out.:hmmmm:

----------
See my Blog!
http://miss-elaine-ious.blogspot.com/

Julie
10-12-2007, 08:36 AM
I am sure you won't be booed from the forum, we welcome everyone here!

I don't think there is anything wrong in being a nurse on the way to something else. We need people in all areas of health care who have had the benefit of gaining knowledge, skills and experience in clinical practice. We also have to face the fact that something that you might be happy to do at 18-20 might not be the same thing you wish to do at 35 or 45.

miss-elaine-ious
10-12-2007, 09:41 PM
Thanks Julie for your support!

I'll keep all of you updated as to my progress.

~Elaine

jojodow
10-12-2007, 10:13 PM
Elane,


It kinda reminds me of a friend of mine who was trying to get into Nursing school.

She's real smart, organized, and friendly. But has some issues with social anxiety and working with people. She is admittedly "not a people person".:sheep:

I told her to look into surgical nursing. As interested as she was in the Organizing, charting, attention to detail....she was a perfect fit for a field where all the patients are unconscious and the work is 75% documentation.

There's so many specialties to choose from, It's a matter of finding where you fit in.:nurse:

MyOwnWoman
10-13-2007, 12:47 AM
Jojo said it before I could......"I wanted to make a difference"

Therein lies the answer for me.

LittleBird
10-13-2007, 12:02 PM
How did I end up in nursing...?

I graduated with my BSc in Biology, and couldn't get a job with it. So I took two years off to work and travel, or that could be work while traveling as I lucked into a job on cruise ships doing the kids programs. I came to a point while working there that I had to decide either to stay on ships long term, or decide what to do with my biology degree. Unfortunately my biology degree was very broad, and I couldn't decide what I would want to specialize in if I was to do my Masters. Medicine appealed to me, but med school didn't. I did a bit of research and found some universities that had fast-track nursing programs for folks with a degree already and thought that I would apply and see what would happen. Three years later, I'm graduated and working... but miss traveling. :)

jojodow
10-14-2007, 03:33 PM
LittleBird,

Ever consider Travel Nursing? I hear they make good money!

I would do it if I wasn't a single mom...and I didn't already hate driving. :captain:

Jess
10-14-2007, 06:08 PM
I think travel nursing is definitely pretty neat, but I think one would need quite a bit of experience first.

Polaris
10-15-2007, 01:58 PM
I ended up in nursing all because of a scholarship.

I never planned to go to nursing school or to be a nurse. I was going to be a veterinarian. Then I won a full ride scholarship through the Air Force to become a nurse (one I applied for on a whim as a "just in case"). I decided to take it for some unknown reason. Even when I did it I can remember thinking "I don't have the slightest clue why I'm doing this but sounds good to me and it's free."

I ended up dropping the ROTC scholarship after the first year and paid my own way through nursing school (yeah - I had that whole problem with authority thing going on). I still don't regret it to this day.

My first day of clinicals was in the ER and I was hooked. Never turned back.

Nursing is in my blood. I feel it is truly a part of my soul.

Plus I'm a little warped and I fit well in this career.

LittleBird
10-20-2007, 05:11 PM
LittleBird,

Ever consider Travel Nursing? I hear they make good money!

I would do it if I wasn't a single mom...and I didn't already hate driving. :captain:

Yeah, it has crossed my mind. Right now, I want to get my legs under me before moving around too much. And it is kind of nice to not move every few months, and store all my stuff at my parent's house. I might look into nursing on a cruise ship someday. We'll see. I'm single, and my only significant other to worry about is my cat... so lots of options.

LesleyJoy
01-08-2008, 12:35 AM
I entered the health care profession as an EMT in the mid-1980s not out of any great desire to do good, but because I was a homeschooling parent who needed to get out of the house now and then. What I found while providing care in the homes, streets, back alleys, and wilderness areas of my district was profoundly satisfying. Along the way I also discovered a love for teaching adults.

One day my fire department suggested I become a registered nurse - and even offered to offset some of the expenses! With their help - and the help of another agency which provided a full scholarship to a university - I began to study. I did not know at that time that nursing would be how God would enable me to provide for my family.

My husband was critically injured a year later. He survived, but could not return to his profession. I completed the requirements for graduation, met the NCLEX for RNs, and began working in a good-sized stepdown unit. Although working with cardiac patients, including those pre- and post-CABG, was interesting, it lacked what was at that time an indefinable something. I then became a hospice RN, first as a staff nurse and then as a case manager. The freedom to practice holistic care was more satisfying, but still strangely incomplete.

Then came the day our son, Matthew, began to decline. When Matthew said he wanted to die at the coast, I began to look for a job, any job, from mid-California to the Oregon-Washington border. I was offered two jobs within twenty miles of each other on the cool, northern California coast: part-time house supervisor for a small hospital and part-time life flight RN for an air ambulance company. I accepted them both. And it was in that small hospital that I found my place in the world of nursing.

Everything I had ever done, from EMS to teaching, from critical incident stress debriefing to acute care, from hospice to flight nursing became the foundation for the work which began in that California hospital. That work is being furthered as I now serve as a Patient Care Services Supervisor in a medium-sized hospital in Oregon. What I am building upon this foundation is beautiful and immensely satisfying. I am grateful for the opportunity I have to act as clinical resource, to ensure the emotional and physical safety of staff so that they may perform well both the art and the science of medicine, to soothe and educate the public, and to defuse volatile situations.

Thank you for reading this missive.

Yours for the journey,

Joy

geenaRN
01-08-2008, 12:25 PM
Wow, Joy... that was quite an answer. You sound like the kind of house sup that I could deal with, well, dealing with. Thanks for sharing how you got to nursing :)

LesleyJoy
01-08-2008, 01:06 PM
Wow, Joy... that was quite an answer. You sound like the kind of house sup that I could deal with, well, dealing with. Thanks for sharing how you got to nursing :)

Thank you, Geena. I am humbled and often frightened when I consider the responsibilities I have as a House Sup. All I have ever really wanted was to be a stay-at-home wife and mother. To find myself employed full-time outside my home by necessity (as opposed to being employed secondary to interest or desire) is startling. The cognitive dissonance I experience is, at times, difficult to tolerate. Having said all that, let me also say this: I have benefited a very great deal from the opportuntities I have had and the people I have met. And I hope I have been - and continue to be - a blessing to those I meet.

Onward! The best is yet to come.

Joy

KimRN
01-09-2008, 09:37 PM
I was offered two jobs within twenty miles of each other on the cool, northern California coast

Joy, did you work in Mendocino by any chance? I adore Mendocino and have often thought of working in their small hospital and living on the bluffs....fantasy, maybe, but I LOVE the ocean!

KimRN
01-09-2008, 09:38 PM
Wow, Joy... that was quite an answer. You sound like the kind of house sup that I could deal with, well, dealing with. Thanks for sharing how you got to nursing :)

I agree, Joy! In thirty years I've had exactly two supervisors like you - a rare breed!!! :shakehands:

LesleyJoy
01-10-2008, 01:11 AM
Joy, did you work in Mendocino by any chance? I adore Mendocino and have often thought of working in their small hospital and living on the bluffs....fantasy, maybe, but I LOVE the ocean!

No, I did not. But if you want to work there (or at any place near the ocean), please do so! Life is waaaaay too short to unnecessarily postpone the important stuff.

You should see where I do live. You could walk north, along the narrow place where the sea meets the land. Look to your left and you can see all the way to where water and sky become one. Look to your right and you will see the evergreen trees lifting their arms in praise. Gulls wheel and mew overhead. The breeze, heavy with both the scent of the sea and the breath of the woods, will swirl around you. The roar of the surf as it spends itself against the sandy shore or the towering rocks sounds like majestic angels rejoicing in song.

I cannot imagine leaving the ocean. And while I am actively seeking employment at another facility, it, too, is by the great waters.

The Pacific Northwest coast has a subtle and pervasive beauty. Our light is most often gently diffused through a high grey sky. When the clouds lower and our world becomes dim, we are cozily invited to come home where it is warm and dry, where welcoming lamps blaze, where hot soup and quiet talk await. At other times the light bounces from a hard, pearl-grey ceiling, gaining intensity as it covers our world. And we are always surprised when white clouds, ghostly promises of yet more rain, part to show the soft, baby blue sky above. It is then that we walk with our faces craned upward, eyes squinting in the unaccustomed brightness, not willing to miss a moment of such glory.

The smell of the ocean and the many sloughs - the tang of sea and salt and decay and growth - is ever-present. For those who love the sound of the ocean's music its rhythm becomes a steady stay upon which to lean.

The flora here show more shades of green than I can describe, from a pale lime/yellow that shimmers in the shade to a green so deep it surely must be black. The tall, tall trees reach their arms ever upward. At their feet the soft ground is comforted by a quilt of ferns, dogwoods, and madrone. The dawn, warming away the morning fog, makes living jewels out of every leaf.

White herons stand sentry in every small mirror of still water. Crows celebrate the morning, roistering from tree to tree. In the afternoon they walk around my front yard, looking for all the world like old, old men without enough to do. Gulls call overhead, carrying the day's gossip. The small, flitting birds, brown things that shelter in the laurel, chip-chip-chip as the day ends. And swallows swoop in the dying light, snatching up the evening insects that rise with the last of the day's warmth.

I am grateful to live near the ocean, in this bit of Heaven on Earth.

Joy

LesleyJoy
01-10-2008, 02:49 AM
I agree, Joy! In thirty years I've had exactly two supervisors like you - a rare breed!!! :shakehands:

Well, now, Kim... thank you!

I wish that my style of House Suping was not rare in the world of acute care, but rare it is. There are most certainly reasons for the unpleasant/harmful behaviors common to middle management types. The opposing demands of the job are foremost, I think. Following closely behind are lack of mentoring and support, corporate cultures that foster hostility, and personal philosophy. These are reasons - not excuses. There is never an excuse for bad leadership.

Joy

Marachne
01-10-2008, 02:49 PM
Joy,

Thanks for your paean to the Pacific NW, you captured it so beautifully and so well! I am always surprised when people talk about how depressing our gray winters are: the quality of the light, and the intensity of the colors are so beautiful to me. When I lived in Minnesota, the sky was clear a lot in the winter -- which meant it was colder, and the sky seemed like a bright, cold bowl. What got to me was the monochrome there -- the plants all lost their leaves and became bare sticks, the snow covered the ground. All was white, or black or gray. The first time I visited Portland after living in Minnesota it was in April -- snow still covered the ground. I stayed near a huge rhododendrons garden and I still clearly remember going to visit it and seeing all the colors and drinking them in like a person who'd be dying of thirst in the desert. That clinched my move back to the west.

Sorry for going off thread :whistle:

LesleyJoy
01-10-2008, 03:02 PM
Thanks for your paean to the Pacific NW...

OFF THREAD ALERT!

Friend,

Thank YOU for using a most lovely word to describe my post: "Paean, A song of joyful praise or exultation." I had not realized that much of what I write about this part of the world is exactly that, a song of praise.

With appreciation and gratitude,

Joy

KimRN
01-12-2008, 06:01 PM
Joy, now you REALLY made me want to move to Mendocino!

What a beautiful description!:highfive:

KimRN
01-12-2008, 06:03 PM
Joy,

Thanks for your paean to the Pacific NW, you captured it so beautifully and so well! I am always surprised when people talk about how depressing our gray winters are: the quality of the light, and the intensity of the colors are so beautiful to me. When I lived in Minnesota, the sky was clear a lot in the winter -- which meant it was colder, and the sky seemed like a bright, cold bowl. What got to me was the monochrome there -- the plants all lost their leaves and became bare sticks, the snow covered the ground. All was white, or black or gray. The first time I visited Portland after living in Minnesota it was in April -- snow still covered the ground. I stayed near a huge rhododendrons garden and I still clearly remember going to visit it and seeing all the colors and drinking them in like a person who'd be dying of thirst in the desert. That clinched my move back to the west.

Sorry for going off thread :whistle:

Ah, Portland. Yeah, it rains but I LOVE the rain. And OSHU is there, too! And downtown Portland is a liveable downtown.

I love Portland, but I adore the coast!

Marachne
01-12-2008, 06:13 PM
I wish I lived at the cost too, but you're not going to find a lot of graduate programs there.

As for Portland, don't forget Powells! (http://www.powells.com/info/places/burnsideinfo.html)

KimRN
01-12-2008, 06:32 PM
I wish I lived at the cost too, but you're not going to find a lot of graduate programs there.

As for Portland, don't forget Powells! (http://www.powells.com/info/places/burnsideinfo.html)

Powell's ROCKS! Between the stuffed salmon at Jakes and Powells bookstore, it's worth the ten hour ride up I5! : D

spencer.jj
02-08-2008, 10:51 AM
Since I was 10 I've wanted to work in some form of health care. First, after reading lots of James Herriot (http://www.jamesherriot.org/), I wanted to be a veterinarian.

When I got braces I decided I wanted to be an orthodontist.

One of my mom's friends was married to an anesthesiologist, and my mom was always talking about how much money he made, so I decided I'd like to be an anesthesiologist.

I realized how much school is required to become an anesthesiologist, so I decided I'd try nurse anesthesia instead. I was set on doing this and had begun taking courses at community college in preparation to transfer to the University of Michigan, where I could get my BSN, work for a year or two in ICU, then start working on becoming a CRNA.

While in community college, I had a "coming-of-age moment" (if you could call it that) and decided I'd rather be a photographer than a nurse anesthetist.

Finally, it was time to decide: pursue photography or nursing. After some thought and talking with parents, friends, etc, I decided that I would stick with nursing because I could do more good for the world as a nurse than as a photographer. And now here I am, nearly done with nursing school, and incredibly excited to be a nurse.

gracenotes1
02-21-2008, 08:08 PM
I went to college straight out of high school. I had no idea what I wanted to be. So by the time I was a Sr. my parents were saying, "just get a degree in something". So I took what I had the most hours in and got a degree in Sociology. then when I graduated I had no idea what one does with a degree in Sociology.
I went to work as a Physician's Assistant/Lab Tech/Receptionist/payroll clerk--in a 4 Doctor Pediatric Clinic. I loved it, espeically working with the Doctors and patients. I had so many questions and I would ask one of the Docs questions all the time--one day he called me in his office and he said, Angela, why don't you go to nursing school? I thought--"ok--good idea". haha
He worked with me on my hours at the clinic and even got me an internship position on the Peds floor at the hospital. I worked there during school. I already had a BS so it only took me two years to get a BSN.
I have never regretted going to nursing school. I love being a nurse. I do not practice anymore because of a wrestling match I had with a tractor trailer truck--the truck won.
Now I am a nurse advocate and a nurse author. I keep my license up and mentor when I can.
Once a nurse always a nurse.
Nursing is a way of life not just a job. I am still a nurse. Can't help it--It is in my blood now.
My advice to any student--is to THINK like a nurse. A student is a nurse so think like it, act like it, be it!!!!
Good Luck to you all.

mayladybug
05-14-2008, 05:19 AM
This is my first post, but one that I feel passionate about, so this is the place to share it I suppose.

I gave birth to my first two children in hospitals. My first one I was only there for 30 minutes before delivery. The second one was 3 hours, but they tried to send me home (an hour away) and I refused. So...when I found myself preggo again, I decided I wanted a home birth with a midwife.

My pregnancy was perfect. I was healthy. The baby was healthy. And the home delivery went perfectly. His 1 minute Apgar was 6, but the 5 minute was 9. I had only labored about 4 hours total.

On day 3 at home he became lethargic. He wouldn't eat. His coloring was bad. So, off to the pediatricians I went. And within 5 minutes of arriving we were in an ambulance to the hospital.

My midwife came, as she was informed of the crisis. He was in heart failure. Hypo-plastic Left Heart Syndrome was the final diagnosis. He only survived 15 more hours. But, I was so impressed with the knowledge and skills of my midwife during that time we awaited death, that I knew that was what I wanted to do. That was in 1985.

Life went on with all the usual challenges of a mother. I had another child 14 months later. And then found myself to be a single parent within 18 months of my last childs birth.

I didn't start pursuing my education actively until 1998. I received my LPN license in 2002. I was burnt out after 4 years of schooling and raising kids and decided to take a break for a year. That lasted 5 years. I tried to get back into a program...but the challenge was huge with so many applicants and so little space.

I finally got back to a program this year....and will receive my ADN degree on June 14th. Although midwifery was what orignally was my inspiration, I have worked a medical floor for 6 years and now am anxious to work in an ER, where I did my preceptorship and cooperative work experience.

I do have aspirations to attain my MSN by the age of 50 and will either focus on NP or CRNA.

I love nursing. It is a gift each day when patients allow me into their space, sharing personal aspects of their life with me so that I can best assist them in attaining better health.

I guess you could call me a Long Hauler....I'm in this for the duration.

LesleyJoy
05-20-2008, 05:30 AM
Welcome, MayLadybug, to Nursing Voices. And thank you for sharing your story with us. Congratulations, too, on your upcoming graduation. When will you sit for the NCLEX? Isn't it astounding what life sometimes presents? The opportunities it brings, although oft disguised as burdens or heartaches, can become our greatest gifts.

Again, welcome. I look forward to seeing you here often.

Joy

Cranky_Student_Nurse
05-24-2008, 09:07 PM
My sister was sick for a really long time. The only thing that was really wrong with her was that due to some sort of reaction to penicillin when she was 14 (and sepsis, I think my mother said, but she wasn't very clear) she went into total renal failure. In the course of her life she had COPD, CHF, Pleurisy, Pericarditis, a heart murmur, syndactyly (don't laugh) Cellulitis, Gout, Lupus (yes, but was cured....? lol) Creutzfeld-Jacob Disease, Type 2 diabetes, .... and pretty much everything she would see on Medical Incredible.

This started when I was four years old (she was 10 years older than me) and with each new "disease" or "syndrome" I'd go an look it up, first in encyclopedias, then in medical texts I'd buy at yard sales or flea markets, then on the internet. And I became FASCINATED by medicine, by disease, by the entire world of medicine.

It was only a logical progression for me to go to school to become a nurse, and my aspirations were to become and ER nurse. Then I took Microbiology as a pre-requisite and fell IN LOVE with microbes, so I'd like to get my ADN and specialize in Emergency Medicine, then my bachelor's in Public Health and do outreach through the ER for the uninsured and underinsured-- you know, teach them about immunizations, about first aid, about proper hygeine, about all that stuff. And, of course, do some cool stuff with microbes :)

So it's taken me a long time, but I'm finally back in school at the age of 28 and I got accepted to an ADN program after 3 years of pre-requisites and an AA degree in Gen Ed. I'm so excited!

wishNhopeNdreamN
05-31-2008, 03:12 AM
There were lots of factors leading to the decision for me to take the steps to become a nurse. The biggest was when my oldest turned 18 and moved out of the house. I was devastated. I knew it would eventually happen, but I felt lost. I needed something to do that would make me feel worthwhile even after my kids were grown. I have always been interested in medical stuff. My favorite channel is dicovery health. 3 of my 5 children were in NICU's for being preemie. My oldest daughter was born with TofF, and had open heart surgery. My cousin who had a master's in social work had recently gone back to get his BSN. All of these things steered me towards nursing.

I just got my acceptance to start NS in august to get my ASN. I'm so excited, happy, and terrified all at the same time.

chicagonurse89
12-28-2012, 03:41 AM
I decided to be a nurse because I always want to be in the medical profession! After having my second life and surviving a serious accident when I was 13, I already planted in my mind that I will either be a doctor or a nurse someday because I wanted to repay those who saved my life! An opportunity knocked for me to enrol into a nursing school. I took that chance right away, and now I am working on my way to be a nurse...who helps other allied medical professions to save lives! I think those who chose nursing for a reason and not just for economic purposes will stay longer in this profession as their practice are grounded from the right reasons! For others who wrote such inspiring journey towards nursing career, good luck to you all!