View Full Version : Online RN-BSN programs


GuitarGirlRN
07-09-2007, 12:25 AM
Anyone in one? I'm applying to a few. Interested in getting opinions about people's experiences!

Thanks,

Colette

KimRN
07-13-2007, 09:06 AM
Anyone in one? I'm applying to a few. Interested in getting opinions about people's experiences!

Thanks,

Colette

I swear by mine! I'm going to the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay through their BSN/LINC program. I absolutely adore the online class experience. I can go to "school" in my pajamas any time I feel like it! There are deadlines and "group work" and it's amazing. All papers submitted online. I pay $360 per unit because I live in California - it is much less for Wisconsin residents.

I'm doing a statistics class, a critical writing class and a health assessment class in September - 10 semester units.

I liked the UWGB site - it was straight forward, I was comfortable with the requirements and they gave me credit for all my college work (I did a TON of humanities, English and Poli Sci classes just for fun).

I'm happy to post the link or send you information!

Marachne
07-14-2007, 02:38 PM
I'm not in a RN to BS program but I'll share my experience w/on-line courses -- I hate them! I'm ok if there is an on-line component to a course, but having no direct contact makes me crazy. Maybe because I love the interaction/exchanges that happen with face to face classes. I also can get distracted and not check discussions often enough and then have to play catch-up.

I know at my uni Oregon Health & Science University) there is a RN to BS program that is mostly on-line but you come in for a few all-day courses. I think that would be a compromise that I'd do better with if I had to do it. OHSU has a completely on-line MPH which I've heard mixed things about from others...and I know University of Arizona has an on-line PhD program which I cannot imagine doing -- with so many classes seminars where the exchange of ideas is critical, I would just feel like I was missing so much! Plus it can be such a time suck. Some folks will go on, and on, without adding a lot of actual content, but then you feel compelled to reply because you're not putting as much (visible) effort into the course. I know that instructors too have to be careful about not being available all the time or their life will be taken over too!

So, my take-home message is that on-line has lots of advantages in terms of accessibility, but it really has to be a form that you can work with. Some of that is also going to depend on the program -- there are different platforms (ecollege, blackboard, sakai, etc) that have their plusses and minuses, and then there is content. If the courses are designed to be on-line and there is an understanding of the best ways to take advantage of the technology, I'd say the program is going to be a lot better than if they just take classroom instructors and tell them to teach an on-line course. But ultimately it's a matter of if you can flourish in the setting (or at least survive).

KimRN
07-16-2007, 07:53 AM
I'm not in a RN to BS program but I'll share my experience w/on-line courses -- I hate them! I'm ok if there is an on-line component to a course, but having no direct contact makes me crazy. Maybe because I love the interaction/exchanges that happen with face to face classes. I also can get distracted and not check discussions often enough and then have to play catch-up.

I know at my uni Oregon Health & Science University) there is a RN to BS program that is mostly on-line but you come in for a few all-day courses. I think that would be a compromise that I'd do better with if I had to do it. OHSU has a completely on-line MPH which I've heard mixed things about from others...and I know University of Arizona has an on-line PhD program which I cannot imagine doing -- with so many classes seminars where the exchange of ideas is critical, I would just feel like I was missing so much! Plus it can be such a time suck. Some folks will go on, and on, without adding a lot of actual content, but then you feel compelled to reply because you're not putting as much (visible) effort into the course. I know that instructors too have to be careful about not being available all the time or their life will be taken over too!

So, my take-home message is that on-line has lots of advantages in terms of accessibility, but it really has to be a form that you can work with. Some of that is also going to depend on the program -- there are different platforms (ecollege, blackboard, sakai, etc) that have their plusses and minuses, and then there is content. If the courses are designed to be on-line and there is an understanding of the best ways to take advantage of the technology, I'd say the program is going to be a lot better than if they just take classroom instructors and tell them to teach an on-line course. But ultimately it's a matter of if you can flourish in the setting (or at least survive).

While I'm comfortable with getting my BSN online with 29 years of experience under my belt, once I get to the MSN level, I intend to do go the traditional "in class" route. I can't even imagine getting a PhD online.

As a side note, I'll probably be getting my MSN and PhD in Oregon! Not sure where we will end up, but there are a lot of great programs in Oregon!

GuitarGirlRN
08-17-2007, 03:33 PM
U of Wisconsin is one of the places I've applied to! Their program seems great. I've sent my transcripts in for evaluation to see what they can do with my B.Mus. from a zillion years ago.

KimRN
09-07-2007, 09:31 AM
So how did it go?? I've found that UWGB gave me credit for almost every single class I had taken over the years so you probably only needed to do the nursing courses with a diversity class along the way!

Jess
10-15-2007, 07:43 PM
Wow, I didn't really know too much about Online RN-BSN programs until I read this thread. I think it really depends on the learner. If you're an online type of person (not classroom/face to face type), go for it. There are, of course, advantages and disadvantages of both, but it all comes down to time and preference.