View Full Version : I am in Nursing School Level 1 soon 2 repeat


Pal
11-12-2008, 06:25 PM
I went through so much stress over this semester. It is crazy...the lack of sleep, scary instructor who consantly reminded THE ABSOLUTE HARDISH OF NURSING COURSE... I am so ANGRY and absolutely FRUSTRATED....I have no idea what I did wrong on the lecture exam...the instructor would go into great details on teaching WHATEVER and the EXAM was complete BULL**** of anything but the WHATEVER was covered in the LONG LONG BORRING LECTURES...FRUSTRATING INDEED...

However, I will be repeating Nursing (I) again because I failed ALL lecture exams. However, I like enjoy the CLINICALS...So I guess I will be seeing the newbies...next semester...I think I will be F***** 100 yrs old when I finally GRADUATE FROM NURSING SCHOOL...

The lecture exams are very different they mess me up BIG TIME. I always think that I did very well but my scores show otherwise.
I am getting a D-

I HATE this **** completely !! :cheers:

runningnurse
11-12-2008, 07:01 PM
I went through so much stress over this semester. It is crazy...the lack of sleep, scary instructor who consantly reminded THE ABSOLUTE HARDISH OF NURSING COURSE... I am so ANGRY and absolutely FRUSTRATED....I have no idea what I did wrong on the lecture exam...the instructor would go into great details on teaching WHATEVER and the EXAM was complete BULL**** of anything but the WHATEVER was covered in the LONG LONG BORRING LECTURES...FRUSTRATING INDEED...

However, I will be repeating Nursing (I) again because I failed ALL lecture exams. However, I like enjoy the CLINICALS...So I guess I will be seeing the newbies...next semester...I think I will be F***** 100 yrs old when I finally GRADUATE FROM NURSING SCHOOL...

The lecture exams are very different they mess me up BIG TIME. I always think that I did very well but my scores show otherwise.
I am getting a D-

I HATE this **** completely !! :cheers:


Sounds like you're having a rough time here. Some friendly tips from the "enemy" (I have been an instructor for the last little while)

First off, breathe! or in other words make sure to take time for you at least an hour a week...yes I know you're swamped etc, but if you don't take care of yourself now you won't be as well prepared to take care of yourself when you are working.

Secondly, read before each class, the instructor is expecting (especially at a university level) that you have read the material and is giving you a more in depth look at it. This means that you need to take your syllabus and go through which chapters are required. After class you can go into more depth in those chapters with what the instructor told you.

Thirdly, if you have questions, ASK! Your instructor can not read your mind and so will not have any clue if you don't understand and don't ask about it.

Finally, get a book for preparing for exams, and work on it during the school year. There are plenty out there that will help you. We used one with some of our students and they found it very helpful, especially with questions like you would find on your licensing exam (at least here in Canada).

Good Luck with the repeat. I know it sucks to fail, it's not easy to swallow, but look at it from the standpoint that it gives you a chance to not only further your knowledge in that specific subject but also allows you to grow in your profession.
:pepsi:

Pal
11-14-2008, 01:55 AM
I got good study habits, however, in my infinite years in school I learned that there is always an abstract ways of figuring out answers or gaining the experienced eye to see through the answers. I am not able to see this approach in Nursing (I) however, many classmates in my Nursing school see it and they tell me honestly that they never studied too hard. I buy that because in Dosage Calculation I never studied but I knew what to look for and excelled with great ease. Meanwhile others sunk in GREAT depression and failed.
:captain:

P/J
11-14-2008, 03:04 AM
I suggest that you go and see the lecturer about the exam, you should be able to see YOUR exam answers with a question sheet. You need to negotiate a time that they can go through it with you, this may take a few weeks to coordinate if they are busy with other classes. If they are not keen, or say that you can have access to it but they can't go through it try saying to them 'I thought I knew the stuff, but I am now REALLY concerned and need your HELP'. If you only have a limited amount of time, pick the questions that you thought were right but you got wrong (not the ones that you realize were wrong and know why they were wrong).

Go in with your head between you legs!!!! You have F*** up, don't argue with the lecturer, else you risk loosing their help on this day and in the future.

Try to explain topics, like you are trying to explain them to your grandmother (if she wasn't a nurse). If you can't simplify it, then you don't understand it.

Try other text books. I went to the textbook given to the med students at our uni. I found that it explained things better for me than the nursing books (I have come from analytical science background). Borrow books for the library and find one that suits you, you might even be able to borrow from other universities (depending on your library system).

If you Uni doesn't round your marks then 70.9999 does not equal 71. I too have found this out the hard way.

Pal
11-15-2008, 12:13 AM
I think, I have figured a solution to my problem. It is not in the reading but in the CRITICAL understanding of the materials. I have the knowledge about various nurse science but I failed to apply it in a critical way.

Oh by the way senior member I don't have my head between the legs but over the neck. SLUTTY CHILD !!!

:proud:

P/J
11-15-2008, 09:39 AM
Sorry I think you miss understood. I meant to be humble (I've just seen too many students march into lecturer's offices demanding answers and the lecturers were not very willing to help them.)


(I've got to stop using colocalisms, on this forum)

Pal
11-15-2008, 06:31 PM
Only the desperate and the poor inferior race are humble. I am of a superior race. I am polite and decent by nature. Nobody ever suspect a thing about my true nature. :aetsch:

Mr Ian
11-16-2008, 10:31 AM
:ahhhhh::eek::banghead:

Pal
11-16-2008, 02:17 PM
I shouldn't talk about race. Perhaps I should have made GENETIC remarks about people's characteristics, whether it is deemed inferior or superior. Thus proving that some GENES are superior to others. This way it is not too GENERAL but more SCIENTIFICALLY specific.



:swordfight::elephant::laugh:

Mr Ian
11-17-2008, 07:22 AM
Hi Pal
I'm intrigued by your posts and your dilemma. Excuse me for being direct but I will - I get a hint of something in your posts that you might have quite a staunch almost concrete way about you and I wonder, if this is true, is it a significant reason why you're struggling with some topics?
I note you say many other students 'get it' wioth some things that you don't seem to so what are the particular area of the exams/studies that cause you more problems than others - like perhaps the social aspects of nursing or models of care?
I'd also ask - for cultural consideration - what is your personal background? You write in a certain style that has a unique slant to it and I wondered if there were any particular cultural reasons for this?
I hope you aren't offended by my questions or comments - and there is a serious intent to help you behind them.

Pal
11-17-2008, 03:12 PM
I take things very lightly but I am just upset with all that which has happened in my life. Everything sucks. I was in the Army for several years and I HATE it. Now I am in a Nursing School and there is no appreciation of my service. Ungrateful BASTARD citizens/Instructors are good for nothing, no special consideration for Veterans. I fear abandonment.

:withstupid::secret::nurse:

Mr Ian
11-17-2008, 05:17 PM
Ok, Well I never considered cultural issues in the sense of 'civvy street syndrome' - how long you been out the service and how long did you serve? Is it possible you're still undergoing transition issues?

I'm going to post my immediate thoughts here - they may be right or wrong. It's up to you to sift them and decide what's of use to you and what's not. I'm travelling for a week so won't be replying til after then.

If you're pretty fresh out then I'm guessing it's going to take an adjustment to get used to the less regimentally structured approaches of civilian nursing/working.

I suggest perhaps seeking out some support from someone with a more sympathetic understanding or awareness of your issue - meaning the civvy street transition - and not so much the nurse training.

You've been trained in black/white principles - but nursing does lots of shades of grey. This may be where your nursing comes unstuck?

You've perhaps still got your hardened critical edge about you and someone else ex-services who understands better than I do might be your best option.

Take from this anything that makes sense to you - discard the rest.

I wish you well.

JacquiBee
11-17-2008, 05:34 PM
one of the most important skills a nurse must develop is reflection. self reflection. this means we need to always ask why. Why did I do that, why do I feel like that, how can I do better or differently to make things work out. Nurses work with people, our patients, and of course fellow nurses etc. To develop sucessful communication we often have to reajust our communication style to get through to the other person, in nursing it is vital your patients understand whats going on. this is part of the "grey" that Mr Ian talks about. We as nurses have to be flexable and adapatable, non judgemental and one of the places they try to teach this is nursing school. our school called it being socialized as a nurse, that is learning to be part of the nursing culture, doing things the nursing way. (I'm not saying that all the old nursing behaviors are perfect thats a different thread).
Asking why is part of the critical thinking that you, Pal mention. If your failing then somehow your not giving the answers they want so I sugesst that as PJ says you try to find out what your not getting right and then ask yourself why, and how could I do things differently or think differently to be a nurse not just answer the question right if your thinking like a nurse then the answer come much more easily

Pal
11-17-2008, 08:20 PM
I think as a Nurse one should be concise and not too abstract. Ofcourse, I know what you mean by "Why" but my concern is that I took numerous courses for the past 6 years after the Army service regarding nursing science, biology, chemistry....ect. However, I fail to understand the basic principles of what to look for in the ASSESSMENT, DIAGNOSIS, PLANNING, IMPLEMENTATION, & EVALUATION questionaires... I don't have trouble understanding KNOWLEDGE based questions but only differentiating and critical assessing the above basic principles and picking up the best answer in given lecture exam...


:captain: :pepsi:

Pal
11-17-2008, 08:46 PM
What am I asking for are hints, clues, and any easier approach to quickly understand how to master these basic principles without further complexities.


:pepsi:

runningnurse
11-17-2008, 09:04 PM
What am I asking for are hints, clues, and any easier approach to quickly understand how to master these basic principles without further complexities.


:pepsi:

Unfortunately those basic priniciples are complex when you look at them. Nursing is really in and of itself "abstract", rather than being a specific science where one can say "the cell of a body does this always" it is more of looking at the entire situation and putting the knowledge you have to bring sense to the whole situation. Nursing is an art. Developing your critical thinking/understanding will take a while, but that is what your nursing school is preparing you for. You also need to remember that nursing is a life long learning curve. Each day you will learn something new and each day will have it's own challenges.
Your analytical skills will enable you to read the situation better and become a better judge, but it will always be different for each situation you encounter.
Just keep thinking of what you would do in the situation you are faced with and use the knowledge that your classes in nursing school provide you with. If you want to work on your critical thinking, use the study guides for licensing exams, as these are what you will be encountering throughout your nursing career.

Pal
11-17-2008, 09:26 PM
I am going over Mary Ann Hogan's Medical Surgical Nursing, Saunder's NCLEX-RN, Frye's 3300 Nursing Bullets NCLEX-RN and KAPLAN NCLEX-RN. These books are helping me but I am seeking additional assistance. Perhaps someone knows more w/ experience in the work area ect...
Therefore, my question is that when looking at the questions how do I use my JUDGEMENT without overthinking. What should I look for in each scenario of Nursing Assessments, such as the assessment, diagnosis, planning...ect...
For example, someone told me that look for ABCs in the assessment like AIRWAY BREATHING CIRCULATION.....If airway is present than look for breathing...if airway is not mentioned and breathing is than look for circulation....ect...

So are there any other box of treats as mentioned above. I am curious :star:

Mr Ian
11-18-2008, 12:11 AM
Hi Pal
Haven't left just yet (tomorrow) - so popped back in. I back what colleagues have said above in terms of what nursing is - but feel you need to make some decision on why it is you're not getting it - before you can move on to 'getting it'.

My intuition (and nothing more) is that you're fixed in the black/white - right/wrong mode - something that is more akin to roles of doctors, accountants, and people who have 1 + 2 = 3 jobs; but these are all outcome or solution focussed roles.

Nursing is much less of a science (as said above) it's an art and it does have large parts of it that are open to interpretation. What nursing develops is the ability to conceptualise and analyse (clinical) situations that includes far more than just a clinical diagnosis and make decisions with/about/for the person/patient where they need that help.
A doc will just diagnoses and treat the illness.
Nursing helps the person achieve what they want to achieve.
I'm not saying docs don't 'care' - but it's more a nursing role than medical.

My thinking is -
Female Pt A comes in with broken leg.
Doc will assess using medical criterion and skills and prescribe a course of action to fix the leg and any associated medical issues.
Nurse will support the leg healing prescribed course - and consider things beyond - such as have they got kids to care for at home? Is that an issue with a healing leg? Pain relief - is it adequate to her needs? As well as dietary requirements; religious needs; family support; advice and information on healing process; monitoring for other problems/complications and seeing to the 'personal needs' of the individual.
Perhaps someone can give a better example as more complex medical issues require more complex nurse thinking on the associated issues (I do mental health).

It sounds as if you've got the crux of the clinical problem and following medical treatment ok - ie recovery from condition - but in nursing it has to be done in the context of the person/patient - and not in the context of just the illness/condition.

As ex-services - I'd suggest this is counter-intuitve to your training because you're not required to look behind the situation - like the politics, religion or the social dynamic and indeed you have to consciously block that out in order to focus on job in hand and 'follow orders' to achieve the aim in the quickest easiest professional way to achieve the solution.

I think you're still wanting/trying to apply your nursing in the 'quickest easiest professional' way - but limiting yourself to a solution to "a" problem - when it may require many more things to consider.

Simplest suggestion I can think of - assuming you have close family or close friends - if you were their relative or only friend and they relied on you to see they were looked after in the best way - what would you make sure the treating team did for them?
And then you have to stop and ask yourself - is this what my friend/relative would want - or is it just what I think is a good idea and they'd actually haste if I did that? And then decide should I do it anyhow because it's good for the healing - or should I do what I know my friend/relative would want me to do?

This is what nurses do for patients - they become their best friend on the inside.

Hope that made sense.

Pal
11-18-2008, 02:43 PM
I just found out from my Instructor that if I get at least 134 pts than I pass. There is still 165 pts to go. So as you can see I have a SLIM opportunity to closely make it or fail MISERABLY.


This why I needed the clues to how and what to look for in an exam. Usually the exams are based on what is the assesment or what is the priority? Thus I'll be studying.

By the way, does Hospital provide Nurse training? Perhaps I like to seek other avenues to becoming a Nurse.


:dontknow:

Sun
11-19-2008, 04:17 PM
You seem to have endured a lot. :cheers:

Pal
11-22-2008, 12:04 AM
I just found out today at my clinical that MY CLINICAL INSTRUCTOR IS A BITCH. SHE was passing me this whole time but today for SOME BRAIN FARTED reason she decided that my efficiency in the CARE PLAN is not good enough for her satisfaction. Therefore, she recommended that I must go work and gain the essential PEOPLE experience by being a CNA or decide something else like X-ray Tech.


Ofcourse, she has no IDEA how HAPPPPPPPY I was when she FREED me from her nursing school BONDAGE.


OHH THE TEARS OF JOY are comming down. I AM FREEEE I AM FREEEEEE, these CHAINS HAVE BROKEN I AM LIBERATED :marshmallow::marshmallow:

Sun
11-22-2008, 12:08 AM
OH MY GOD, are you happy to be thrown out of NURSING. IS NURSING that BAD??
:marshmallow:

Pal
11-22-2008, 12:19 AM
Nursing is a HAPPY place with happy people and a happy hospitals with Happy patients and everything is GAY. I am just being a JERK for HONESTY SAKES.


Good luck to all who are goin to hell, Ooh! I meant, goin to nursing school :proud: