View Full Version : Unsure of what the best road into an RN is for me...


msadams224
01-28-2009, 05:03 PM
Hi everyone!

First I just want to say thank you to everyone who offers insight into this issue for me. It is indeed confusing and I'm not sure exactly what to do.

I recently graduated from an accredited university with a Bachelor's of Arts in Psychology. I would like to get into a nursing profession but am unsure as to what the next step would be. I am looking to get into the field as quickly and painlessly as possible (haha).

My options as I understand them:

1.) Accelerated second Bachelor's in Nursing programs - problem, highly selective. I did well in my prerequisite science classes but maybe not well enough to be admitted without retaking classes (time consuming and who really wants to retake Organic chemistry!?)

2) Become a Nursing Assistant - problem, do I really want to start from scratch when I already have a BA and many upper level science courses under my belt?

3.) LPN/LVN programs - Are these equivalent to an Associate's degree in Nursing?
I know there are numerous programs to go from LPN to RN in only a few years and online, but once again... Do I want/need to start from scratch after 4+ years of college?

Thank you so much to everyone who replies. Your answers will be tremendously helpful in clearing this up for me. If there are any other options that I have missed please feel free to fill me in.

Also feel free to Private Message me if you feel the need.

Thank you everyone!!! :)

CrazyGoon
03-01-2009, 08:28 PM
I am in a simular position. I have a B.A. in Political Science and now want to be an RN. I looked into the Accelerated BSN, and I thought it would be the best for me. However, the only college in my area that offers the program is a private university and basically it would cost me about $50,000 to get my BSN. So that is out of the question. I have decided to go to a public university that does not have the accelerated program, but they do have some classes that they do not require students who already have a Bachelors degree to take. So it is going to take me longer but it is much more affordable.

Also, The LPN is not the same as an Associates degree in nursing. I think LPN programs take about 1 year to complete.

There are two ways to become an RN. You can get a Bachelor's or an Associates degree in nursing. The Associates degree program is quicker but you will not have as many opportunities to advance in the nursing field as you would have if you had a Bachelor's degree. However, I have read that for people who already have their Associates in nursing there are "RN to BSN" programs at many colleges that allows RN's to get their BSN.

Well that is really all I know. I hope it helps. Good Luck! :)

jrobison
03-06-2009, 08:24 PM
Ok so I am currently a semester one nursing student at a Community College. In response to the nursing assistant course, for our school this is a requirement. I work in the hospital on the weekends as a nurse assistant and I do benefit from it a great deal.

As far as going the LPN route it is NOT the same thing as and associates in RN, there are a few differences such as LPNs can not do IV pushes or charge.(this is at my hospital) There is a huge pay difference between LPN and RN out here also, even though the LPN's work and do pretty much just as much as the RN's.

There are programs to get and Associates and become an RN, and that also does not limit you to progressing. There are many programs out there with online schools and Universities in which you can go from your ASN to a BSN or even your MSN. You just have to find which would be best to you.

I personally think that starting at the bottom, nursing assistant, really is the best thing. If gives you a more basic look into the field and does not usually take long to get, 6 weeks where I am. This makes it easier to see if nursing is really for you. It also gives you more of an appreciation for how hard the nurse aids work. I can tell the nursing that did aide work from the ones who didn't simply by the way they speak to me.

Anyways I hope that helps! Good luck to you!

Jane Seymore
12-12-2012, 09:00 AM
Hi,

One of the advantages of becoming a Nursing Assistant is the number of training centres and the possibility of receiving grants and financial aid from the government. One site which has more information about the funding you can apply for can be found at free cna training (http://freecnatraining.org).

However, because you already have your BA - congrats by the way :) - then possibly the accelerated Bachelors in Nursing would be a wiser option even though more challenging!

Good luck with whichever one you go for :)