View Full Version : Guess I'll start the Hello's


Sunny
06-24-2007, 09:47 AM
Hi everyone. I'm Sunny and one of the old geezers now. I've been in nursing over 30 years and work part time now. I'm looking forward to getting to know everyone on here. :)

KimRN
06-24-2007, 04:21 PM
I shall be an official member of this topic in 20 days. At that point I'll be 50 and a nurse for 29 years.

Too bad we don't have a "young nurses" forum so I could post in that for another two-and-a-half weeks! :)

Mother Jones, RN
06-25-2007, 10:01 AM
Hi Sunny. I'm glad to meet you. Yes, we old geezers are still plugging along in nursing, but most of my friends are going part time, or getting out of nursing all together. What type of nursing are you involved in?

Kim, what are you doing on birthday? You must do something special in honor of the BIG 5-0!

Marachne
06-25-2007, 01:38 PM
And I'll hit that big number in December. But I'm a relatively newbie nurse. Oh, to have figured this out years ago.

Well, they say 50 is the new 30. And I'm a gerontologist, so you can trust me on this one ;)

My my, can you tell schools out? Maybe I'll actually make some posts on my own blog!

KimRN
06-25-2007, 04:31 PM
Hi Sunny. I'm glad to meet you. Yes, we old geezers are still plugging along in nursing, but most of my friends are going part time, or getting out of nursing all together. What type of nursing are you involved in?

Kim, what are you doing on birthday? You must do something special in honor of the BIG 5-0!


I am working. Can you believe that?

KimRN
06-25-2007, 07:23 PM
And I'll hit that big number in December. But I'm a relatively newbie nurse. Oh, to have figured this out years ago.

Well, they say 50 is the new 30. And I'm a gerontologist, so you can trust me on this one ;)

My my, can you tell schools out? Maybe I'll actually make some posts on my own blog!

LOLOL!!! I will take the word of a gerontology nurse! If 50 is the new 30, then 100 is the new 80 and I bet I'm still working when THAT one comes along. We'll have to have a forum for the "ancient nurse"!

Terry
06-25-2007, 09:37 PM
Yep, I'm a geezer, you're a geezer, wouldn't you like to be a geezer too? And if you can remember that Doctor Pepper commercial, then I guess we're all geezers! :D

Who invented that word anyway?

But I prefer to think of myself as in my prime (thank you very much!)

KimRN
06-26-2007, 03:06 AM
Yep, I'm a geezer, you're a geezer, wouldn't you like to be a geezer too? And if you can remember that Doctor Pepper commercial, then I guess we're all geezers! :D

Who invented that word anyway?

But I prefer to think of myself as in my prime (thank you very much!)

I not only remember that commercial, I remember the guy in it was named David MacNaughton!

The things I remember scare me sometimes......:eek:

Marachne
06-26-2007, 08:13 PM
If 50 is the new 30, then 100 is the new 80 and I bet I'm still working when THAT one comes along. We'll have to have a forum for the "ancient nurse"!

I figure that I'll probably be working right along with you Kim!

100 may be the new 80, as can be seen by folks like my 86 year-old mom who, after having her second knee replaced, five days later walked into the house--we're talking 16 stairs to the front door.

OTOH, there are those patients who are so beat up physically from their health (physical & mental) issues that the 60 y.o. looks like they're in their late 80's.

Nurse Stella
06-26-2007, 10:00 PM
I'll jump in and say "Hello!" I guess I fit into a few catagories- Home Health, Hospice, Mental Health, med/surg-- But most definitely the "Over 50" group! :eek: I don't blog, but I've been reading them for a long time. Hope it's ok for me to join in here.

B. from northern New England

Mother Jones, RN
06-30-2007, 06:53 PM
Hello Nurse Stella. Welcome to Nursing Voices. I'm glad you are here. As a member of the Old Broad's Network, I believe that older nurses need to stick together :D

MJ

POPT
06-30-2007, 09:00 PM
Hello everyone,

I fit into the geezer category. I'm 53 and have been a nurse for 33 years. When I met my boyfriend 8 years ago he had been a nurse only for about 3 years (Not to worry, he is 55! I'm not robbing the cradle! Sigh!) He said to me, "Are you one of those old warhorse nurses who has been around forever and seen it all?"
Somedays it feels like that.

What do you other geezers remember about nursing that the youngsters have no experience with now? Glass bottles for IV's? Sharpening your own needles? Red rubber catheters? Keeping a cap on your head? White hose?

It's nice meeting you all.

POPT

EileenRN
07-01-2007, 04:50 PM
Hi everyone! I'm a fellow geezer at 56, and I've been a nurse for 30+ years. I now work part time teaching nursing assistants, which is a whole lot less stressful than being a director of nursing. I thought when I left that full time plus job, I'd never want to do nursing again. But I'm recovered now.

I remember doing dressings without disposables, white caps with a black stripe, doing things like emptying bedpans (metal) without gloves...yikes!

Mother Jones, RN
07-02-2007, 09:02 AM
I remember wearing white hose, giving up my seat at the nurses station when a doctor walked in the room, and glass IV bottles. I also remember doing all kinds of procedures WITHOUT the use of gloves. No fear of HIV back then.

Here's to all the old war horse nurses out there who are still in the game. Cheers! :D

MJ

Mother Jones, RN
07-03-2007, 09:56 PM
When I first entered nursing I could double shifts, back to back without breaking a sweat, but now I can barely get through an 8 hours shift. The demands of the job keep growing during a time of my life when I'm starting to slow down. I'm looking for advice. How are you coping with growing older while working as a nurse?

MJ

POPT
07-04-2007, 09:28 PM
I moved into an outpatient clinic position working 8-4:30, M-F, weekends and holidays off, with lower patient acuity. The pay is less than what I would make in a hospital but the lower stress is worth it. No more rotating shifts, bedpans, or lifting.

Judy Pelfrey
07-05-2007, 04:27 PM
Hi!
I'm over 50 and have been in nursing 36 years! I've worked just about everything but have stayed in pysch the longest at 26 years. (I can't spell it but I can work it!)
Maybe it's a good thing I'm doing QM now.
I'm amazed at the changes in nursing since I started and expect to remain working til I see how much I make when I retire (about 9 years). At that point I want to be able to work in the library. I know that I will need to supplement my income to support my medication needs, but would like to something besides nursing. So many of the folks I know who have retired from our facility are working again usually part-time, but in nursing because it brings in the best pay. Since my prince makes less than I (in it for love)I anticipate having to continue to work after retirement.
How many of you are in the same boat? And if you're not, what is your secret?

Bev
09-01-2007, 09:05 PM
I am an old nurse who is tired of racing around on the small unit , giving meds, and running, working every other week-end. Help, I need a change! Any ideas?

jetrn
09-02-2007, 12:41 PM
Ambulatory surgery. No weekends, no holidays, NPO. The only meds given are antibiotics and pain meds.

geenaRN
09-02-2007, 10:59 PM
Hmm... that sounds pretty sweet, actually.

MyOwnWoman
09-03-2007, 12:29 AM
I must say it's been nice reading about everyone. The experience we bring to the table as the "oldies but goodies" is vast and I can't wait to learn from all of you; not only on the nursing end but how to cope during the stressful times.

In some ways it seemed easier to cope when I was younger, but I'm afraid it's because I know more now than I did than and am not afraid to spout off at the mouth.

jojodow
09-03-2007, 11:47 PM
I think we youngens (am I a Youngen? I guess I'm more like a Midd'en) could learn a lot from ya'll "Old Fogies" I'm glad ya'll are here.

KimRN
09-04-2007, 02:47 PM
Ambulatory surgery. No weekends, no holidays, NPO. The only meds given are antibiotics and pain meds.

Hmmmmm....never thought of that!

CoffeeGal
10-17-2007, 11:57 PM
Yep...we have seen so many changes. I've been the the hospital setting +28 years. From Isolation Units(remember them)to Pediatrics to Critical Care. The funny thing now is..here in Florida the average age for a critical care nurse is 46. As many of the younger nurses are leaving the hospital setting to either become an ARNP or leave the bedside to go onto upper management. With fewer nurses available at the bedside, my hospital is shifting patient care to PCT's (patient care techs) with the RN's being the "Team Coordinators". Out the window with "Primary Care Nursing" back in with "Team Nursing" Yep...we have seen many changes and Nursing is cyclic.

CoffeeGal (one of those old broad night shift nurses)

MyOwnWoman
10-18-2007, 12:13 PM
I loved Primary Nursing. I loved getting to know my patients and have them get to know me. It was my favorite "era" of nursing. It's funny, come to think of it, the patients seemed to have fewer complaints back then than they do now. I wonder if that means anything?

Julie
10-18-2007, 02:13 PM
Ah Team nursing....

I remember turning up for work one morning, to be told by our ward sister / manager that today we were introducing team nursing! We didn't know what we were meant to do, what evidence there was for doing it or anything about it, but we had to get on with it..... yes they were the days!

KimRN
11-22-2007, 03:29 AM
Hi Coffee Gal,

I'm an old broad night shift nurse, too! And proud of it! Stay in this profession long enough and you'll see everything come and go at least twice! : )

LesleyJoy
01-03-2008, 12:04 PM
Well, I also am an "old broad RN." Spent quite a few years in the back of an ambulance. Then went to cardiac care in a hospital and was bored (and saw cross-eyed secondary to working the night shift). Went to hospice next and learned to witness grief. When one of my children became hospice-appropriate I learned how vicarious grief differed from anticipatory grief and how anticipatory differed from experiental grief. I also learned that love undergirds all care, both given and received. Left hospice to become a part-time hospital supervisor and a part-time lifeflight RN. I then gave up taking care of patients in order to take care of nurses. Is suping real nursing? No - and yes. It is a privilege - and a political battle - to ensure staff have what they need in order to provide the optimal care which defines true nursing. Sigh. Am tired. Am actively seeking a nice day job at a combination clinic/urgent care/emergent care in a small community. Hope they invite this "old broad RN" to join them!

Joy

Shane
01-03-2008, 12:41 PM
Welcome, Joy! :wave: So good to have you here.

LesleyJoy
01-03-2008, 12:51 PM
Welcome, Joy! :wave: So good to have you here.

Thank you, Shane.

As I mentioned to Geena on another thread of this site, I have enjoyed reading the NV posts. I plan to return as often as possible to benefit from and to offer in kind the encouragement, humor, and support that is so evident here.

Thanks again.

Joy

KimRN
01-03-2008, 01:29 PM
Thank you, Shane.

As I mentioned to Geena on another thread of this site, I have enjoyed reading the NV posts. I plan to return as often as possible to benefit from and to offer in kind the encouragement, humor, and support that is so evident here.

Thanks again.

Joy

Hi Joy!!! Welcome to NV and I bet they'll welcome you with open arms no matter where you apply!!

Kudos on doing supervisory work - takes a special personality to handle the staff AND the management! :wave:

LesleyJoy
01-03-2008, 02:11 PM
Thank you, Kim, for the greeting and the affirmation. Being a house sup does take a special person alright. Along with being older than dirt, it helps if a house sup has:
- short term memory deficits
- a very thick skin
- the ability to sing and dance when no one else can hear the music
- a near-pathological stubbornness
- a true appreciation for the fluid and unpredictable world of medicine
- a love for the warp and woof of humankind

A good stiff drink helps, as does hitting one's head repeatedly against a brick wall to convince one's self that THIS time the staffing, patient census and acuity, the myriad of personalities, and the budget are all going to get along and not one thing or person in the house is going to break, squeal to a halt, or fall on the floor.

Sigh.

Onward! The best is yet to come!

Joy