Nursing Voices Forum  Meet other nurses, share your nursing knowledge and experiences
Nursing Talk from Around the Worlds


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-25-2007, 02:02 AM
P/J's Avatar
P/J P/J is offline
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Victoria, Australia
Posts: 348
P/J will become famous soon enough
Cool My Favorite Patient...Could Talk Underwater

Nte: I am a student nurse and so this is about an assignment for that.

Working in Oncology, doing research for assignment into roles and relationships, health perception. So doing morining rounds (wakeup, and Obs) and find a pt who is rather happy to see a young male nurse in her room. So I decided that seeing everyone else isn't in any condition to spend an hour answering my questions, then I would do my assignment on this lady. 2 hours later I have all my notes for my assingment and half her history. It turned out that she had been told that she was not expected to survive a month, and had accepted this (years of cancer and coping). She was just one of these people who by making someone elses days, she makes her own.

It was amazing the fact that two new nurses who were so scared on thier first hospital placements could have had such a great time. And from our educator we hear that pt are still asking about us.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-25-2007, 10:11 AM
Mother Jones, RN's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 425
Mother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond reputeMother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond reputeMother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond reputeMother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond reputeMother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond reputeMother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond reputeMother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond reputeMother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond reputeMother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond reputeMother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond reputeMother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond repute
Default Life's lessons

This is really going to sound strange, but when I was a young student, I learned so much about life from my dying patients. I guess it's because dying patients are looking back over their life, and trying to make sense of things. I would sit and listen to them, and learn about what they were going through. They were grateful for the company, and would share some really amazing things with me. Keep listening to your patients. They can teach you a lot.


MJ
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-25-2007, 01:33 PM
Marachne
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default beautiful smiles

Oh, there are so many. Working with people over time makes such a difference in how relationships develop. And then, of course there's the fact that so much of the time they are at their most vulnerable, esp. at EOL.

Two quick sketches:

1) When our facility first opened its "hospice & palliative care unit," (in quotes because well...I won't go into it here, lets just say that it's a quasi-hospice unit). Anyway, we admitted someone w/metastatic prostate cancer who lived almost 2 years! There were attempts to discharge him, but I think his family had some kind of pull w/the gov'ment--and he was part of the 82nd Airborne so he was 100% service connected.

Anyway, very sweet, gentle man (at least in this stage of his life: I've learned over the years that some of our sweetest vets were often not such sweet people earlier in their lives...but I digress AGAIN). So, among his many endearing qualities, every night he would say "now you be careful driving home." It was just such a wonderful ritual, plus the idea that he was doing what he could to look after us caregivers...

The other story is someone who just recently died. First came in for care while having palliative radiation. Went home for 3 months, and was readmitted for EOL care. This gentleman had had a tracheotomy and, I'm assuming his cancer must have involved his vocal cords because he couldn't speak. He was given a "talker" (one of those things you put in your mouth to make kind-of intelligible, robotic sounding speech), but he refused to use it. He was tall, had been, among other things a dance instructor and moved with amazing grace--even when using a cane.

But it was his smile....oh, I have never in my life seen such a beautiful, heartwarming smile. Up here in the Pacific NW it rains a lot, but his smile would light up a room on the darkest, dreariest day. It was so heart wrenching when he came back to us, but also so glad we were able to make his passing a good as possible.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-25-2007, 02:23 PM
geenaRN's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: California
Posts: 390
geenaRN has a reputation beyond reputegeenaRN has a reputation beyond reputegeenaRN has a reputation beyond reputegeenaRN has a reputation beyond reputegeenaRN has a reputation beyond reputegeenaRN has a reputation beyond reputegeenaRN has a reputation beyond reputegeenaRN has a reputation beyond reputegeenaRN has a reputation beyond reputegeenaRN has a reputation beyond reputegeenaRN has a reputation beyond repute
Default

This will probably come across as being weird, but I had a patient that had a simple procedure that went VERY wrong. He ended up on so many life support machines that there was hardly any space left in his room.

I took care of him a lot. And his very devoted family.

I have had lots of patients like this, but the thing that stuck out for him was that he cardiac arrested out of the blue. It wasn't unusual that he would arrest (he was very sick)... but I'd never seen ANYONE go from sinus tach to asystole before without so much as a blip. One second there were qrs's marching across at 110/min, and then... flat line. I saved the EKG.

I'd always seen bradycardia or idioventricular beats or even some PVC's to "warn" me of the arrest to come.

Even now, I think of that patient almost every time I walk into that room. We coded him 5 times. He didn't make it.

All from a fairly frequently done, elective procedure. It was so very very sad.

I guess not a "favorite" patient, but a memorable one.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-25-2007, 07:20 PM
KimRN's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 391
KimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond repute
Thumbs up The Reason We Do What We Do

Quote:
Originally Posted by P/J View Post
Nte: I am a student nurse and so this is about an assignment for that.

Working in Oncology, doing research for assignment into roles and relationships, health perception. So doing morining rounds (wakeup, and Obs) and find a pt who is rather happy to see a young male nurse in her room. So I decided that seeing everyone else isn't in any condition to spend an hour answering my questions, then I would do my assignment on this lady. 2 hours later I have all my notes for my assingment and half her history. It turned out that she had been told that she was not expected to survive a month, and had accepted this (years of cancer and coping). She was just one of these people who by making someone elses days, she makes her own.

It was amazing the fact that two new nurses who were so scared on thier first hospital placements could have had such a great time. And from our educator we hear that pt are still asking about us.
Welcome, PJ!!! What a neat patient...it's patients like that who remind me of why I'm a nurse in the first place.

Sometimes it is easy to forget, but you'll find them throughout your career!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-03-2007, 10:39 AM
MyOwnWoman
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Angry Test

Can you see me?
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-03-2007, 11:49 AM
MyOwnWoman
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Unhappy See my post

I have tried several times to reply to the post on "Favorite Patient" I must be too long winded because it won't let me post it. My TEST posted ok, but not my actual post.

Soooooo....if you want to know about my favorite patient you'll all have to go to my web site.

hmmmm.... maybe this is really a plug
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-04-2007, 06:26 PM
KimRN's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 391
KimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond repute
Default

Plug received and appreciated! : D
Reply With Quote
  
 

Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:41 AM.


Copyright © 2006-2012 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands