Nursing Voices Forum  Meet other nurses, share your nursing knowledge and experiences
Nursing Talk from Around the Worlds

Go Back   Nursing Voices Forum Meet other nurses, share your nursing knowledge and experiences > General Nursing Topics

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-16-2007, 04:45 PM
Jess
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Smile Memorable Thank Yous

Has anyone ever received something memorable like a card, gift from a patient? (I know a card/gift is not really acceptable, but you guys know what I mean) It doesn't even have to be a card or a gift, it could just be a "Thank you so much."

I was caring for these two elderly women and they were super sweet. When I left, they would be like "You're not coming back tomorrow?" Both wished me good luck and told me I would make a fantastic nurse in the future. It definitely made my day and I will remember both of them for a long long time.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-16-2007, 11:18 PM
Marachne
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Where I work(ed) -- it's hard to think about going to the "big house" (hospital vs. LTC unit) we had regular rotations of fellows that came through. The hospice/palliative care delineation was sometimes very clear (i.e. someone coming in to stay during a multiple week course of radiation who either did not have family or lived in another part of the state), other times it was a matter of the patient/family wasn't ready to say "hospice" yet.

We had a patient who had very suddenly been diagnosed w/ALL -- it was hard for the patient and his mildly cognitively impaired wife to understand/accept the terminal nature of his condition. He had developed plural effusions while in the hospital and had been tapped twice. They were talking about putting in a Plurex catheter to allow for draining the effusions w/o having to go over to the hospital...however he was visibly failing day-by-day.

I arrived for work the day before the scheduled surgery, and found out that, despite his highly weakened condition, they were still planning on doing the operation. This would involve an ambulance trip of at about 5 miles, all the prep, the procedure, post-op and the liklihood of coming back in awful rush hour traffic (no way around it -- there's a river to cross).

I spoke briefly with the fellow voicing my incredulity at this still happening. He said he'd tried everything he could think of. I said, well, I've got 8 hours, I'll see what I can do.

Long story short, I convinced them to not do the procedure. When I told the fellow to cancel the procedure his comment was (in a lovely African accent "let me shake your hand." It was one of the nicest compliments I've ever gotten.

p.s. the patient died that night. It felt good to know that I had helped him and his family come to peace with his terminal state.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-16-2007, 11:26 PM
jojodow
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Smile

I had this patient with Anorexia/bulemia (pretty severe...she weighed about 70 lbs.) on the unit. She was there for months. I was one of the few nurses she liked and cooperated with. We had to be Nazis and keep a 24 hr sitter on her to keep her from purging. She was very young.

She colored me a picture and I hung it at the nurse's station. Last time I was up there, it was still there.

She was discharged to an Eating disorder specialty hospital. I hope she's getting better.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-17-2007, 01:43 AM
geenaRN's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: California
Posts: 390
geenaRN has a reputation beyond reputegeenaRN has a reputation beyond reputegeenaRN has a reputation beyond reputegeenaRN has a reputation beyond reputegeenaRN has a reputation beyond reputegeenaRN has a reputation beyond reputegeenaRN has a reputation beyond reputegeenaRN has a reputation beyond reputegeenaRN has a reputation beyond reputegeenaRN has a reputation beyond reputegeenaRN has a reputation beyond repute
Default

I took care of a patient in CVICU once and got to know the family.

One day I came to work and was floated to psych. That happened to be the day that the patient and family came back to the unit to bring me a bottle of wine that they made themselves on their vineyard!

But that wasn't the amazing part - the amazing part was that they came all the way up 3 more floors and to the other end of the hospital to personally deliver it to me at the psych ward!

I got a doll once from the daughter of a woman I took care of as a CNA.

And I have a weird little pizza man doll that sings and twirls a pizza... from a pizzeria owner, of course
__________________
code blog
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-21-2007, 08:19 PM
MyOwnWoman
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

The sweetest thank you I have ever received was in the form of a "Will you marry me?" This man was about 70ish and his wife at his side was also in her 70's. She smiled as big as he did and all I could do was blush.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-30-2007, 11:43 AM
KimRN's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 391
KimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond reputeKimRN has a reputation beyond repute
Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jess View Post
Has anyone ever received something memorable like a card, gift from a patient? (I know a card/gift is not really acceptable, but you guys know what I mean) It doesn't even have to be a card or a gift, it could just be a "Thank you so much."

I was caring for these two elderly women and they were super sweet. When I left, they would be like "You're not coming back tomorrow?" Both wished me good luck and told me I would make a fantastic nurse in the future. It definitely made my day and I will remember both of them for a long long time.
I have received a few Christmas ornaments over the years and I remember every patient when I put them on the tree!
__________________
The ER is the only place where you are rewarded for efficiency by getting more patients!

Kim
http://www.emergiblog.com
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-02-2007, 02:08 PM
Elocin22
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Back in the day, when I was a nurse aide at my hometown hospital I took care of a man, who to this day is still one of my very favorite patients. He used to yell at the top of his lungs, random syllables (although, they seemed to be the same syllables over and over), but we could never figure out what he wanted. He had some sort of organic brain disease that eventually cleared enough for him to make sense. He was in and out of the hospital at least once a month for the years I took care of him. (Sweetest man ever...he would lay his head on your shoulder when you were trying to move him and just sigh and smile.) I won a "scholarship program" (a.k.a. beauty pageant) and his family sent me a beanie baby rabbit. I had a dream about it and the man named the rabbit "Fred" in my dream. It's still at my parent's house, and every time I go home and see it, I think of him. He died several years ago, from gangrene.

Not necessarily a "thank you" gift, but one that supported me as I had helped support them in their time of need.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-04-2007, 09:23 PM
Marachne
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Yesterday I got one of the sweetest, simplest "thank yous" ever.

I've just started a new position as a Fellow in an interdisciplinary palliative care fellowship. As a new learner, I'm feeling the usual: stupid, slow, incompetent. At the end of a visit with a patient (who is not that trusting of the hospital in general), as we were leaving the room, he asks me my name. I tell him and he says "I just wanted to thank you too." Left me floating on air

For further details, read a longer entry about it on my blog http://awfyh.blogspot.com/

And yes, I AM pimping my blog. I have so little traffic, I figure it couldn't hurt.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-04-2007, 10:37 PM
neuronurse
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I got the best thank you of my life yesterday.
I had been caring for this pt that had been on the floor for about 2 weeks. She was paralyzed from C3 down and because of breathing difficulties we had to trach/vent her. This meant that she couldn't speak all this time, and couldn't move her arms. Essentially she had no communication but mouthing words or blinking yes/no.

Yesterday they capped her trach so for the first time in two weeks she could speak! I walked into her room (I wasn't her nurse yesterday but had heard she was feeling down) and she gave me her million dollar smile and said "hello" We talked for a little bit and then she just started saying "thank you" over and over again.

It brought tears to my eyes to hear her voice. It was better than any card I have ever received!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-10-2013, 11:48 AM
malenurse354
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

When I was still a nursing student, we are not allowed to receive gifts/favors from the patient we handled. I had this patient who got motorcycle accident, his jaw bone was broken , so he need to have interdental wiring. I was the student nurse assigned to him, he looks scary with his facial expression and overall appearance, so I never had that much interaction with him. But of course I did my job very well, supported him during the procedure and etc. I never expect that on the last day of our duty, he will be giving me presents ( chocolates) and a kind thank you word. Though we are not allowed to take that , my CI allowed it that time. I don't really expect to get it from him and I can't just forget that thank you until now
Reply With Quote
  
 

Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:14 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1
Copyright © 2006-2012 Nursing Voices