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Old 12-19-2007, 03:09 PM
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Default What language would you learn for your job?

I've often thought that the superpower I wish I had was the ability to understand ANYONE, regardless of language or accent.

Sadly, this has not come to pass. I tried to take a medical Spanish class once, but the instructor was 100 years old if she was a day and couldn't hear. We spent most of the time repeating our questions/comments.

I wish I were fluent in Spanish, because a lot of my patients speak that language. I've also seen a lot of Farsi, Tagalog, and some Russian, Mandarin and Cantonese.

I wish it were easier to learn different languages. Maybe they should teach rudimentary medical phrases in different languages in nursing school? Not that there isn't enough to do as it is
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Old 12-19-2007, 07:23 PM
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I've been learning a small amount of Cantonese with the hopes of communicating with Chinese patients. It's been challenging, but fun at the same time!
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Old 12-19-2007, 11:17 PM
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French for me.

Our nursing board has provided us with cards which say various things in different languages. It is supposed to be helpful if someone can't speak english. We are not encourage to try and say the words, but give the card to the patient and point at various parts.

It is new and we will see how it goes.
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Old 12-20-2007, 08:38 AM
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Default Yo Quiero estudiar espanol.

I'm mapping out my nursing education to minor in Spanish. It's a growing demographic and I think I'll get alot of mileage out of it. At my uni, there are two levels of medical spanish. If I ever make it back to San Francisco, I may try a little Cantonese, but it intimidates the heck out of me. I break into a cold sweat when I try to pronounce the words on the back of a fortune cookie and they're written frenetically.
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Old 12-20-2007, 08:54 AM
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For me it would be Spanish. Not only because it is the up and coming language of this country, but my father speaks Spanish. He never taught me Spanish as a child because he believed that if you learned two languages at once, you were master of neither.

So...... I got Rosetta Stone Spanish. No, it's not medical Spanish, but it sure is user friendly and easy to learn. I have a long way to go before I'll be comfortable with conversational Spanish, but what the heck.

I also know a little (and I mean very little) sign language. I know enough to ask if the patient is in pain and where does it hurt. Of course I know the alphabet, but that really takes forever!
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Old 12-20-2007, 01:59 PM
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I used to be a sign language interpreter, and then I became a medical interpreter...and then, eventually a nurse. I've used my ASL/sign language a little bit since I've been an RN, but at this point I would want an interpreter if I was doing any major discussion. I too feel guilty for not having at least a working knowledge of Spanish, as that is our largest growing minority population, especially since so much of interpreter services are relay (done over the phone).

What are the most common languages where you work/live? Here it seems that besides Spanish it's Russian, Vietnamese, Romanian...but I think Somalian is also high on the list
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Old 12-20-2007, 07:11 PM
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The most common languages in my area are English (of course), Greek, and Italian.
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Old 12-20-2007, 07:12 PM
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Oh for heaven's sake...... Spanish too!
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Old 12-21-2007, 08:28 PM
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Default Como?

Definitely Spanish!

Although the high school down the street from our hospital has 43 primary languages spoken in the homes it serves!

We are lucky enough to have a dedicated ED Spanish interpreter now, but still have to use the little interpr-phone for all the others...

I can charade with the best of them, though!
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Old 12-21-2007, 09:08 PM
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Ditto. I want to learn Spanish.


MJ
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