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Old 01-01-2008, 06:47 PM
RoxiRn
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Default Self-Centered co-workers

How many of you out there work with someone who only cares about what is happening with them. As charge today, one of the nurses
was to go from the main ER to the Fastrack (urgent) area at 1045.
She gave report at 1045 and sat and did her charting until 1130.
In the meantime we were already 2 nurses down and one of the on-coming nurses had to relieve triage for lunch and then her as the fastrack nurse. This took an additional nurse (relieving) off the floor- so essentially 3 nurses down with ambulances knocking down the doors. When I asked her why she wasn't in the track yet she blew up, threw a chart and basically told me I wasnt her boss, she had charting to do and "how dare I" tell her what she should be doing. After trying to explain that it wasnt fair to the rest of the nurses who were already working 2 short that they had to wait an additional 45 minutes before they could go to lunch because she was "charting" when she was to be somewhere else, she started crying and said she couldn't work with me and was leaving. (which of course she couldnt do because the supervisor told her it would be abandonment). Later in the day when she had calmed down, I tried to discuss this with her and try to make her see the rest of the nurses position, but it was all me, I, me.....I get so frustrated being in charge and having to deal with self-centered people..thank god the majority of the nurses on our unit are great. most said "it's about time someone told her about this". Yet, i dont think I should have been the one to do it. So I'm sure tomorrow I'll be pulled into the office. I just want to go to work, do my job and go home.
I hate all the bull-crap. How should I deal with this when it comes up later. And it will, because this person does not let anything go.
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Old 01-01-2008, 09:25 PM
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First of all, if you were the one in charge, then YOU should be going to "the office" to give your boss a head's up about how this person is acting. Just present the facts, leave emotion and blaming out of it - it isn't your job to discipline her. If your boss feels that she needs to have a chat with her, she will.

It sounds like she has issues. Burnout? Problems at home? It is not normal behavior to throw charts and say "you're not the boss of me." Cuz, well, you are.

If you're comfortable, maybe you could ask her what's wrong, if anything is bothering her, etc. Maybe she's a slow charter. Maybe the fast track scares her for some reason and she was dragging her feet and got defensive when you called her on it.

In any case, *I* myself would go to my boss and explain the situation and let him/her deal with it. Good luck... let us know how it goes.
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Old 01-02-2008, 10:36 AM
RoxiRn
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I did speak to my manager about the incident. The doctor who witnessed the whole thing asked "how did you stay so calm while that crazy women was throwing things around". Actually, it
happened so fast, and I was burning inside, but was really glad
I did keep my cool because my manager totally frowns on
acting out at the nurses station. Another nurse said "you shouldnt have called her on it cause she is "fragile"".
I think your right about the burnout. we just built a new hospital and our ER is busy all the time. She has difficulty taking more than 3 pts at a time. It gets really frustrating
when your in charge and people are melting down when they dont have a big assignment, and whine that they have this to do or that to do, or the Dr hasnt seen my pt yet and I'll soon have all this stuff to do- even though we have standing orders for basic labs,x-rays etc...which they dont do.
I tried to explain to her about the unfairness to the rest of the staff and that when I am in charge I am her "boss". Most of the nurses on the unit are great and volunteer to take the ambulances etc....but if you have 1 or 2 of the "fragile" ones it makes the whole day a lot more difficult.
I guess you can tell I hate to be in charge. I'd rather take
6-7 of my own patients (all critical) than be in charge haha.
But if you refuse to be in charge, it is reflected in your eval, so I get through it on the days the clinical co-ordinators are off. Thanks for the advise....I have a committee meeting today with my manager and will speak to her about it person today again.
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Old 01-02-2008, 12:26 PM
MyOwnWoman
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Default Fragile in the ER

Hmmmm... fragile in the ER. That sounds like an oxymoron to me. Neither fragility nor egos belong in the ER; both will cause disaster.
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Old 01-02-2008, 12:40 PM
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Yeah, that's the crappy thing about doing charge, and I've thought it myself many times - that it's so hard to work within everyone's personality!

I'm not sure that "fragile" belongs ANYWHERE in nursing, let alone the ER. Good luck. Let us know how it turns out.
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Old 01-03-2008, 01:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MyOwnWoman View Post
Hmmmm... fragile in the ER. That sounds like an oxymoron to me. Neither fragility nor egos belong in the ER; both will cause disaster.
Fragile does not cut it in ER.

And I speak as someone who went through a "fragile" period many years ago. That is also called "burn out". It means time to get another, less stressful position for awhile.

Acting out is never cool at the nursing station! Yikes.

What happened that day had nothing to do with you, I can bet my next paycheck on it. If she is in the throes of burn out, she is barely able to focus on anyone or anything except how miserable, sad and trapped she feels.

I snapped out of it. You have to put your "work" face on when you enter those hospital doors and leave the personal angst in the car.

For the record - I don't like being charge. I'm a VERY good Indian, I don't want to be Chief!
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