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Old 01-10-2008, 12:25 PM
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Default What's your favorite nursing task that others might find... objectional? :)

What do you just looooooove to do that others would cringe at? GuitarGirl RN wrote a very interesting post about helping to lance a cyst in the ER.

My favorite thing to do is drain stomach contents. One of my most memorable moments as a nurse is when I put an NG down someone that was in a lot of pain and nauseated.... very uncomfortable.

I got back a liter and a half of bile. How does anyone fit a liter and a half of bile into their digestive tract and not throw up? Anyway, his relief was practically palpable and he was actually thanking me profusely for putting a plastic tube up his nose. Never been thanked for THAT before, and haven't since, either.

Anyway, it was most satisfying. I mentioned this to another nurse recently and she cringed and said that was gross. No way!!

Give me an NG, a tummy full of junk, and a cath-tip syringe any day and I'm a happy RN
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Last edited by geenaRN; 01-10-2008 at 12:29 PM.
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Old 01-10-2008, 12:43 PM
LesleyJoy
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Geena,

When I worked for an ambulance service the task I found most satisfying was the successful placement of an endotracheal tube. I was a happy camper if I had an patient with an airway (and who was perfusing, of course! )

The activity that bring me the most satisfaction as a House Sup is defusing volatile situations. A close second is addressing the multifaceted issues that occur when resources are or threaten to become overwhelmed (ie, multiple and simultaneous critical ED patients secondary to fire, car wrecks, or local disasters).

Joy
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Old 01-10-2008, 01:37 PM
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Wow, what a great question! I always liked packing deep abdominal wounds. It was the closest thing I could do that was akin to performing surgery.

MJ
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Old 01-10-2008, 02:09 PM
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I really like preparing a body after a person dies. It feels like such a loving act to remove all those lines that they picked at, wash them gently, put some lotion on them, and a clean gown, prop their mouth closed, cover them with the "passage quilt" (a special quilt that stays on them until they are picked up, and then covers the bed for at least 24hrs in the room they were in), and then call the family in.

That said, I don't know if it's necessarily objectionable to other nurses.
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Old 01-10-2008, 03:36 PM
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Wow... these are awesome answers. Definitely not a fan of diffusing volatile situations. I'm not particularly a fan of packing deep wounds or dealing with deceased bodies, either. In fact, if there is anyone at all available to go in with me to remove lines, wash the body and prepare it, I take them in with me.

There's just something about a body whose soul has left that I find creepy. And after hearing about reflexes and such, I'm always afraid one is going to do something and scare 10 years off of my life.

Anyway, Marachne, I'm interested in hearing more about this "passage quilt." What do you do with the quilt once it's done the 24 hours on the bed? Is it just one quilt? Who made it? Why was that tradition started?

You can start new thread if you want so as to not derail this one.
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Old 01-10-2008, 03:53 PM
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Its a while since I have done this, but there is something about passing a urethral catheter and relieving someone of a couple of litres of pain that they have suffered for hours.
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Old 01-10-2008, 04:41 PM
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I think that people outside of the nursing profession might think that we are strange birds. I don't think that we are strange; I think that we are unique!


MJ
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Old 01-12-2008, 05:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Julie View Post
Its a while since I have done this, but there is something about passing a urethral catheter and relieving someone of a couple of litres of pain that they have suffered for hours.
Julie, I was going to say the same thing! Urinary retention is horribly painful and I will be inserting a catheter before the patient even sees the doc in the ER.

You want a grateful patient? Drain a balloon sized bladder!

Instant gratification for the patient and the nurse!
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Old 01-12-2008, 08:40 PM
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Great minds Kim!
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Old 01-13-2008, 12:34 PM
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Ok, I don't even know how to put into words what I like because it's so bizaree that you will all think I've gone mad. So, I'll just say it outright. I like to go with the doctor to tell the family when one of their loved ones have died. When the doctor leaves, I remain behind and try to answer all questions they have. I like giving them support and allowing them to vent. After talking, I ask them if they would like to see their loved one and if they do, I take them to the room (with smelling salts in hand) and give them some time to say goodbye. I don't know why, but this part of nursing gives me some of the greatest satisfaction. It makes me feel like a part of the family and that the patient was a person that was loved.
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