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  #11  
Old 02-26-2008, 07:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Julie View Post
I just cannot understand why a patient would object to a male nurse exposing her hip and doing a dressing. After all, the person who did the operation was reasonably likely to have been a man and I'll bet there would have been no arguments about that!
I think it was more the thought that we were going to fully expose her abdomen and pubic area (she was in her late 20s) and leave her exposed. I think she was pleased when we draped her then removed the blanket so that only her hip was exposed. I don't think any of us would like to have anyone come in and whip off our sheets exposing ourselves to everyone in the room. A doctor we have met before and chattered about the procedure, we are then put to sleep and you can't do much about your modesty then!
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  #12  
Old 02-26-2008, 08:01 AM
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Sorry Joy you miss understood me and I have now tried to correct the post somewhat . Any 'you/we's in the post are royal you/we. The questions were not directed at you directly...
Thanks, P/J. I am so glad I misunderstood you! A transient misunderstanding is better than having given offense!

I posted the following in response to your private message to me. I think it is also suitable to post here:

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Originally Posted by P/J
...I am recently come across a number of nurses who have refused to treat gays and drug uses as they don't agree with them on a religious basis, and I believe religion should not come into it.

P/J,

What those nurses are doing is completely reprehensible! They are either practicing a harmful religion or their interpretation of their religion is badly skewed.

There is a vast and unbridgeable difference between what a person is worth and what a person does. We nurses are called (or should be called) to "do no harm" either physically, psychosocially, or spiritually.

I have prayed and will continue to pray for them, their patients - and you!

Joy
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  #13  
Old 02-27-2008, 02:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Julie View Post
I just cannot understand why a patient would object to a male nurse exposing her hip and doing a dressing. After all, the person who did the operation was reasonably likely to have been a man and I'll bet there would have been no arguments about that!
Honestly Julie, female patients refuse to have me, a male, perform procedures more often then you probably think. It's a discrimination that I feel we continue to allow. But, I don't want to hijack the topic...as I've seen in other forms, this particular issue could take up pages and pages of debate (usually quite vicious).
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  #14  
Old 02-27-2008, 07:05 AM
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It is kinda funny. Patients want male Doctors and female nurses. Now why is that? Especially older people.

Some of my best nurses were male. They were caring and compassionate, and usually respected privacy of the patients more than the female ones did.

But alot of the time--the older residents in the SNF thought that the male nurses were doctors.

We had a female doctor that visited some of her patients--and they thought she was a nurse.

Course--these days everybody and their brother wears scrubs and no one can really tell who anyone is. Even the dietitcians look like nurses. This bugs me!!

I have a problem with it.

I think nurses should look like nurses. Not that we should go back to caps or anything like that but I think it is important to look like a nurse.

Whoever came up with the idea that nurses should wear white had not been a nurse very long. I don't think it was Florence--do yall?

I just think we should have some way to differentiate nurses from housekeeping. And Physcial therapist--oh don't get me started on them!!!
hahaha

Male nurses are becoming more and more prevalent and I am glad--take heart gentlemen--society will catch up--one of these days!!!
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Old 02-27-2008, 03:15 PM
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I personally think these are subjects worthy of debate:

Nursing uniforms - why do they often look nondescript overalls worthy of wear by a housekeeper / cleaner (not that there is anything wrong in actually doing those jobs, they just aren't nurses).

Men in nursing - why are patients allowed to decide that they don't wish to have them near them when it would be rare (unless a very intimite examination were to take place) for a such a choice over a male doctor!
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  #16  
Old 02-27-2008, 04:22 PM
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Julie,

Perhaps the strong preference for female nurses is primarily cultural in nature. William Edward Towns, 2002, addresses the view of the nurse in a thought-provoking article entitled, Examining the Role of Men in Nursing: Recommendations for Action ( http://www.flcenterfornursing.org/fi...NursingRpt.pdf ). Furthermore, since sexual vulnerability and/or modesty issues must also be considered in the care of the female patient, allowing the patient to dictate the gender of the nurse is, in my opinion, prudent. This is not to say that men cannot provide good care. I am simply stating that some females do not feel completely safe with a male health care provider.

Now about the way we dress... I agree that something must be done. But I am not certain that returning to a specific uniform is indicated. I think that it is incumbent upon the healthcare provider to introduce themselves each and every time they enter a patient's room. For example, "Hello, Mrs. Smith. I am Robert/Susan (or Mr./Mrs. Anderson). I am a nurse." If RNs, CNAs, PTs, RTs, and MDs consistently introduced themselves (AND wore badges with letters large enough for the patient to read) we'd have less confusion in the healthcare setting.

OK, that's quite enough from me. What do the rest of you think?

Joy

Last edited by LesleyJoy; 02-27-2008 at 04:35 PM. Reason: snaggly syntax revision
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  #17  
Old 02-27-2008, 05:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Julie View Post

Men in nursing - why are patients allowed to decide that they don't wish to have them near them when it would be rare (unless a very intimite examination were to take place) for a such a choice over a male doctor!
At times we have male health care aids working on our unit. Sometimes it will happen where a patient (male or female) will refuse to be bathed by the male health care aid. It is their choice. However, we will remind them that this individual is a professional in their own right and here to do a job. If the patient chooses to refuse to be bathed by them, then they will be informed that they may not be bathed at all or will only have a very quick wash, depending on how busy their nurse is.
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  #18  
Old 02-29-2008, 08:31 AM
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Originally Posted by NurseSean View Post
I've seen in other forms, this particular issue could take up pages and pages of debate (usually quite vicious).
Yeah I do a lot of that - but the forum annoys me too which just makes me write oppositionally to everything. However, on this point I am fixed. A pt has the right to refuse treatment from anyone.

As for uniforms - fluorescent yellow lettering "N U R S E" stamped on your butt.
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  #19  
Old 02-29-2008, 08:35 AM
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On the more general issue of 'moral dilemmas' my forthright view is there are personal matters and you are not employed nor licensed for your personal feelings or beliefs but for your abilities as a nurse to provide care.
If there's a protocol or provision for it to be done - then it ought be done. However, I am prepared to accept in cases such as Joy issues may be dealt with responsibly and fairly. Seeking an alternative as Joy did is fine by me if you find yourself emotionally compromised - dumping the patient and telling people 'its not going to happen' is not right.
As a supervisor/manager I would prefer such things to be discussed before hand rather than at crisis point tho, especially if they are foreseeable.
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  #20  
Old 03-01-2008, 05:18 PM
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Hmmmmmm...... I guess if it's not against the law, then I'd say it is my obligation to carry out the wishes of the patient when he/she is unable to carry them out him or herself.

Although some things may not be right for me, or be what I would do; I'm don't think that it is my responsibility to explain to the patient why I would not do something. That would serve to only make the patient feel bad or uncomfortable about his/her decision.

I suppose if I was in direct conflict, instead of telling the patient why I would not do it, I'd get someone else to do it who did not have issues with what is to be done. In that way, both your mind and the patient's mind can be free from guilt.

In the long run, I believe I am here for the patient's right and beliefs, not my own. I'd expect a nurse to respect my decisions if I were a patient as well.
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