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  #31  
Old 12-03-2007, 10:27 PM
Elocin22
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In the spirit of P/J: People who shuffle their feet, especially in flip-flops. PICK UP YOUR DAMN FEET!!!!
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  #32  
Old 12-06-2007, 10:22 PM
MyOwnWoman
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Default Pediatric Parent Pet Peeves (PPPP)

A few of my pediatric parent pet peeves from an ER perspective.

1. The parent who brings their child into the ER with a 104 temperature but did not give them Tylenol or Motrin because the child "wouldn't let me give it to him." Let me see, who is the child and who is the parent.

2. The parent who tells the ER nurse that the child has had a fever for the last week. When asked by the ER nurse exactly what the fever was they respond by saying, "I don't really know, all I know is that he's felt hot the last week but I didn't take his temperature."

3. The parent who brings their child to the hospital because he is "really sick" but won't allow the child to have blood work, Xrays or an IV because it's "too traumatic" for the child. Ok, I don't get it, what exactly do you want us to do for your child?

4. The parent who, despite the high fever, demands that the child be bundled up with heavy blankets for "his comfort." Ok, let's not worry about the fever rising to seizure point, as long as the child is comfortable in "your" eyes.

5. The parent who tells you her 14 year old daughter could not be pregnant because she's never had sex. "The pregnancy test must be wrong do it again." She tells you that straight faced as her daughter is laying on the bed with her boyfriend and she has "hickies" all over her neck. Hmmm....maybe the way they are cuddling in front of you might give you a clue as to what they do when they are alone.

6. The parent who feeds their child McDonald's in the ER despite the fact that you have asked them not to feed their child anything because they came in with abdominal pain and we have to determine what the problem is. That also goes for the child who vomits everything he eats........well....don't feed him right now. Come on, it's not rocket science.

7. My all time favorite. The parent who KNOWS the buzz words to use to get back in the ER right away and get a weekend babysitter for free. What words might those be? "I think my baby stopped breathing." Yep.......ding ding ding....we have a winner right here folks. Drop the baby off early Friday afternoon and disappear until Monday morning.
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  #33  
Old 12-07-2007, 12:44 PM
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How can a parent not know if their baby had stopped breathing? Wouldn't the blue skin color tip them off? WTF????? And honey, let me tell you, if my baby had stopped breathing, there is no way in hell I'd leave my child's bedside. The nurses would have to call the National Guard to escort me out of the hospital.

Your list cracked me up, but sadly, everything on that list is true.

MJ
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  #34  
Old 12-28-2007, 11:44 AM
storknurse05
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Nurses who don't restock the basics before going off shift...(IUPC, FSE, IV fluid)

Nurses who wait until the shift schedule is done to call in sick (usually about 1 hour before start of shift).

Gaping holes in the schedule including no one on the next shift to do charge, so I have to work a double to do it (on the weekend).

Nurses who come go into my patient's room and change things without telling me (like turning down my pitocin or increasing IVF rate)...just call me to notify.

Patients who come to the hospital for a labor check and bring every person they've ever known...bonus points for showing up in an ambulance and all the visitors get there before you do (I did a huge post on my blog about this very topic)

Labor support who will not do ANYTHING for the patient...drinks especially (when they'll get themselves a drink, but not her)

#1 pet peeve on my unit. We get a certain amount of "bag lunches" for patients overnight so that when they deliver we have some food for them. I HATE when nurses eat the lunches because they "forgot" something or "were running late". I hate when patient's boyfriends or friends steal them all...but I think it's more dispicable (sp?) when RNs steal them because they know better that we don't get any more....
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  #35  
Old 12-28-2007, 02:23 PM
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Oh man, I have one really big pet peeve and it isn't even that hard to do: if you use the last of something, get it replaced!
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  #36  
Old 12-31-2007, 04:02 PM
MyOwnWoman
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Marachne~
What type of electronic medical records do you use?...and does it interface with some of the doctor's offices?
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  #37  
Old 12-31-2007, 06:19 PM
Marachne
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Originally Posted by MyOwnWoman View Post
Marachne~
What type of electronic medical records do you use?...and does it interface with some of the doctor's offices?

The VA (Veteran's Administration). We use a system called CPRS. It links all VA records, so VA clinics, consultations, etc are all available, including from other parts of the VA system (I know we can get records within the "Visin" or region, I imagine its possible to get to records from anywhere in the country. The pt records also records inpatient drug administration, and cross tracks pain assessments (0-10 scale) from the electronic medication system. Nice when you're trying to figure out patterns of PRN usage -- in general, only nurses use both BCMA (the medication system) and CPRS. Anyone else though: pharmacy, physicicans, therapists, etc can see medication use (and time of dosing -- or at least when it was scanned for administration).

The system has templates that can (should for some things) be used, but you can also free text to your hearts content. Labs and imaging reports brought into the note too. It's a really good system.
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  #38  
Old 01-03-2008, 02:05 PM
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Quote:
The system has templates that can (should for some things) be used, but you can also free text to your hearts content. Labs and imaging reports brought into the note too. It's a really good system.
I live for charting - any system that lets me free text would be heaven! Maybe I should check out the local VA!
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  #39  
Old 01-03-2008, 02:47 PM
Marachne
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Originally Posted by KimRN View Post
I live for charting - any system that lets me free text would be heaven! Maybe I should check out the local VA!
I don't know about SF VA. I know Palo Alto has a great palliative & hospice unit, but not much else about it.

I love working at the VA because I so enjoy working with our veterans. I also like working in a place where the culture is so much one of respect--in general, we do feel like it is a honor to care for those who served (and this is coming from a multi-generational lefty radical type). The pay doesn't tend to be the highest in an area, but they do survey and provide a competitive wage. The benefits tend to be really good -- 13 holidays, very generous vacation and sick leave. Union shop. And working for what is, in essence, socialized medicine means you don't have to go through 30,000 hoops to get appropriate care. Also, once you're in the system, you can transfer to any VA and keep all of your accumulated sick/vacation/pension. You don't even need to get a local nursing license -- any state license will do, as you're on federal property! And yes, I think the record system is really good. Our medication management system was invented by a nurse, and has proven to cut down on medication errors. If you work in LTC, it is so far removed from any private (or even not-for-profit) facility -- you NEVER have to worry about running out of supplies, because the facilities are often directly tied to the hospitals, and the hospital's are teaching hospitals, you have providers available 5 days/week, rounding on patients, geriatric and other specialized fellows, etc. At our facility, while x-ray, lab, and pharmacy are only open on-site during business hours, we have 24hr access to the hospital services.

Downsides? You have to learn a whole new language in terms of acronyms and military-speak. It's a huge bureaucracy which can be a total PITA. As I said, you can probably get paid better elsewhere in the area. And for me, the great irony is that I work for the one medical system in the area that doesn't provide domestic partner benefits.
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  #40  
Old 01-03-2008, 02:47 PM
Marachne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KimRN View Post
I live for charting - any system that lets me free text would be heaven! Maybe I should check out the local VA!
I don't know about SF VA. I know Palo Alto has a great palliative & hospice unit, but not much else about it.

I love working at the VA because I so enjoy working with our veterans. I also like working in a place where the culture is so much one of respect--in general, we do feel like it is a honor to care for those who served (and this is coming from a multi-generational lefty radical type). The pay doesn't tend to be the highest in an area, but they do survey and provide a competitive wage. The benefits tend to be really good -- 13 holidays, very generous vacation and sick leave. Union shop. And working for what is, in essence, socialized medicine means you don't have to go through 30,000 hoops to get appropriate care. Also, once you're in the system, you can transfer to any VA and keep all of your accumulated sick/vacation/pension. Double-time for holidays. You don't even need to get a local nursing license -- any state license will do, as you're on federal property! And yes, I think the record system is really good. Our medication management system was invented by a nurse, and has proven to cut down on medication errors. If you work in LTC, it is so far removed from any private (or even not-for-profit) facility -- you NEVER have to worry about running out of supplies, because the facilities are often directly tied to the hospitals, and the hospital's are teaching hospitals, you have providers available 5 days/week, rounding on patients, geriatric and other specialized fellows, etc. At our facility, while x-ray, lab, and pharmacy are only open on-site during business hours, we have 24hr access to the hospital services.

Downsides? You have to learn a whole new language in terms of acronyms and military-speak. It's a huge bureaucracy which can be a total PITA. As I said, you can probably get paid better elsewhere in the area. And for me, the great irony is that I work for the one medical system in the area that doesn't provide domestic partner benefits.
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