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Old 03-15-2009, 01:39 AM
Singh
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Default Nurses with full beards?

What do you think of Sikh nurses having full uncut beards? Of course it is kep clean and neat, but never trimmed.
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Old 03-15-2009, 02:03 AM
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I have worked with a few Sikh nurses with full beards with no issues, one was even a preceptor for a shift. The difference is in the uncut vs unkept. I have see neat ones and I have seen untidy ones. It is also the whole picture of the nurse which is important (this applies to all of us) people will see you as clean if you look (and smell) clean, uncut beards or not.

This topic however brings up the age old debate of racism in the workplace. If there are a set of rules which are supposed to apply all staff, behavior, dress, grooming; is it racism if some people are excused of the rules because of religious, political or social expectations?
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Old 03-18-2009, 09:48 AM
Mr Ian
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Singh View Post
What do you think of Sikh nurses having full uncut beards? Of course it is kep clean and neat, but never trimmed.
Male or female?
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Old 03-18-2009, 10:27 AM
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Male or female?
Good question!
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Old 03-18-2009, 10:37 AM
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Seriously now.

The question is how does the Sikh feel about it, and how critical is it to him?

What I don't know, for instance, is how [B]obligatory[B]is this? If this is an absolute obligation, that must not be violated for any reason; well then that answers it.

My only real question is can one keep the beard clean, out of the way, etc. I wouldn't want blood in my long beard (mine was down to my abdomen at one point in time) while working a trauma.

I had a similar issue, but maybe more flexibility. For traditional Jews, a beard is standard, but not absolutely obligatory. Many rabbinic authorities trim or remove their beards. So, when a transport service worried about OSHA (being able to fit a seal for a HEPA mask) hired me, they said if I can find an exception for religious reasons then I may keep the beard. Appearance wasn't their issue. I ended up taking the beard off. But again; for us that's an option.

I can tell you that the Sikh paramedics who work out of Espanola have beards. Doesn't seem to be an issue. Mind you, none of them have really really long ones that I've seen. Same for our one Sikh physician.

I don't think appearance should be an issue. I think that would be hard to justify. I only wonder about safety/hygiene; but even that would vary depending on the sort of nursing the fellow does.
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Old 03-27-2009, 03:36 PM
rojan
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is it racism if some people are excused of the rules because of religious, political or social expectations?


I don't think so. It's but a way of respecting someone's belief, just as how we want our beliefs respected.
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Old 03-31-2009, 09:42 AM
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is it racism if some people are excused of the rules because of religious, political or social expectations?


I don't think so. It's but a way of respecting someone's belief, just as how we want our beliefs respected.
It's religism, politicism and socialism-expectatism.

We all have our moral codes - and most cultures share basic ones - like affinity to one's own (sense of belonging) or acting for the common good of the people (or rather, not doing so can lead to being ostracised or punished).

But when it comes to the nuances of understanding other cultural differences there is a simple divide between the tolerant and the intolerant.

There are some things that are not tolerated well inter-culturally (religious belief or behaviour; marital laws; gender roles) - and other things are incorporated into other cultures (curry, noodles and pizza; language).

Being tolerant of the differences in others makes for better tolerance back.
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Old 04-01-2009, 07:04 PM
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But my question has not really been answered; so its example time:

Nurse 1 is Christian he comes to work wearing a bracelet/bangle with an etched pattern on it. Nurse 2 is Sikh, he also wears a bracelet/bangle with an etched pattern on it.

The hygiene policy of the hospital states that jewelry that may come in contact with patients (so hands and arms) must not be worn; with the exception of a plain wedding band.

Both nurses are called into the managers office. They are both reminded to the fact that by accepting a position at the hospital they accepted the policies of the hospital including appearance/dress and hygiene. Nurse 1 is told that he must not wear the bracelet, nurse 2 is allowed to continue to wear it due to his religion. (The bracelet is one of the 5 items that all baptized Sikhs must wear).

Racism? Religism? Cultural tolerance?
(This is not attacking any particular religion, however this kind of thing is happening.) There is an answer, which was provided by my Sikh preceptor when I was a student.
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Old 06-04-2011, 02:09 PM
ixjacobxi
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It's religism, politicism and socialism-expectatism.

We all have our moral codes - and most cultures share basic ones - like affinity to one's own (sense of belonging) or acting for the common good of the people (or rather, not doing so can lead to being ostracised or punished).

But when it comes to the nuances of understanding other cultural differences there is a simple divide between the tolerant and the intolerant.

There are some things that are not tolerated well inter-culturally (religious belief or behaviour; marital laws; gender roles) - and other things are incorporated into other cultures (curry, noodles and pizza; language).

Being tolerant of the differences in others makes for better tolerance back.

nurse practitioner
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Old 06-04-2011, 02:10 PM
ixjacobxi
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I can tell you that the Sikh paramedics who work out of Espanola have beards. Doesn't seem to be an issue. Mind you, none of them have really really long ones that I've seen. Same for our one Sikh physician.

I don't think appearance should be an issue. I think that would be hard to justify. I only wonder about safety/hygiene; but even that would vary depending on the sort of nursing the fellow does.

nurse practitioner
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