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  #31  
Old 11-26-2008, 02:48 PM
blankenstein
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well, here's my dilemma:

as i said in my first post on here, i already have a bachelor's degree, so obviously i'm aware of how to juggle work/school (i'm sure nursing is going to take a hell of a lot more study time than any of my communications classes ever did). my only problem is that i'm not 100% sure that becoming an RN is EXACTLY what i want to do, which is why i was considering taking the CNA route. being a CNA wouldn't give me the same experience as an RN, i know, but it would at least give me an idea of what i would be jumping into should i decide to go for my RN, right? or would being a CNA not expose me to what being a nurse is really like?

also, i know that there are a number of different types of nurses, but i'm having a hard time finding some good research on them. how would you guys suggest i A)get a good idea of what being a nurse is really like, and B)find good, reliable information about different nurse specializations?
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  #32  
Old 11-26-2008, 04:25 PM
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Have you investigated if your local hospitals allow work experience? You might only get a few days, but if you contact a few hospitals you might get a better idea of the role of the nurse. I think that this might give you a better idea than becoming a CNA. The fact that you are already thinking about becoming an RN means that you already have an idea of the role.

Remember that you can work as a CNA as you study (in many states), so if you do the CNA qualification first it doesn't lessen the length of your course, but you can always leave after the first year and work as a CNA.
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  #33  
Old 11-27-2008, 01:01 PM
mhcns
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If you really think that nursing is for you, then just start in school. Know it will be vastly different and harder than anything you had to cope with in communications. But you will learn at an exponential pace and if you are motivated, smart, and work hard, you will have the opportunity to help people in ways that you don't even know about at this point. Just do it. Know that it is very very hard. Make your decision and step up. From the nurse educators in the world, we hate to see people be unsuccessful in school but we have a duty to the profession, society and you to ensure that our students are capable of practicing at a minimally safe level. Do not confuse that with being nasty or excited about cutting people from programs. It is what it is. People think nursing is easy and it is not. We are usually the ones calling the docs and telling them what is going on. More often than not we are telling them what we want them to order. You have to be smart, prepared and motivated to continuously learn or people will start to die around you. Think really hard about going to nursing school and if you should choose to, start with the BSN don't do the LVN or ADN thing. Just step up and do it.

Gary Graham RN MSN
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  #34  
Old 11-27-2008, 01:09 PM
mhcns
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The wonderful thing about nursing is there are so many areas you can practice in. So many different roles you can play in the health care industry. Getting a BSN will never be a hindrance to you. You may never work in a hospital but still practice nursing in home care, or as a school nurse, or get a job combining the communications and nursing. Remember only about 60% of nurses work in the traditional hospital setting. Moreover, in the traditional setting there are multiple roles, specialties, etc. If you think you want to, then go to school, work hard and the worst case scenario, you will only work part time, making 40 or 50$ and hour on the weekends. Not a bad way to earn Christmas money. I believe that as you go through school you will see so many options you will be very glad you did go to school.

Gary Graham RN MSN
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  #35  
Old 11-27-2008, 01:24 PM
mhcns
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Default To CNA or not CNA

As an educator I find that one of the most common impediments to learning is that people think they already know something. This is most common in the untrained assistant that thinks they know a procedure or concept therefore they do not feel the need to learn. That can be a huge hindrance to education. I just had a CNA fail the catheter check off because she thought she already knew it and she did. Unfortunately, with several bad habits which caused her to fail the checkoff. On further exploration she intimated that she didn't practice or go over the procedure as she already knew it. I have been reading back in the posts and read the stuff from Pal... Wow, I wonder if PTSD is an issue, I don't know as one old soldier to another let me just say , seek help.
Gary Graham RN MSN
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  #36  
Old 11-27-2008, 01:53 PM
blankenstein
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thanks for the advice, mchcns. seems that the opinion on whether or not to become a CNA first or just jump into an RN program is split down the middle. considering i already have a bachelor's, though, i suppose it would be better to just get into an RN program right off the bat.

i understand that here in the U.S. there are master's entry programs in nursing. being an educator, would you suggest i do that since i've already got my bachelor's, or should i just for a BSN?

and to everyone - i appreciate your willingness to offer your advice. i've visited a couple of other nursing forums, but you guys are the only ones that seem sincere in helping people out. on some of the other boards someone will post a question asking for advice, and though the post might get upwards of 50 views, might only have 2 or 3 replies if they're lucky. you guys all seem very warm and eager to help out, which is awesome. so thanks again! as i'm sure you know, i've got a lot of questions that roll around in my head when i think about getting into this profession.

oh, and i hope everyone's having a great thanksgiving. =D
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  #37  
Old 11-28-2008, 08:30 PM
Nurse Stella
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Best wishes in what ever course you choose to take. As for the Master's programs in nursing, it is my understanding that you have to have an "RN" before you start them. They don't cover basic Nursing 101 and such. Where you already have a bachelor's degree, the BSN route sounds like the best way. Most of the first few semesters will have been covered with your communications degree.

Bev
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  #38  
Old 11-29-2008, 04:09 AM
blankenstein
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certain universities have master's RN programs for those that have a bachelor's in an area unrelated to nursing. but, if the difference in responsibilities between a BSN and an MSN aren't too terribly different, i'd probably be more likely to just get another bachelor's.
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  #39  
Old 12-06-2008, 06:39 PM
mhcns
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Blankenstein, it really depends on what you want to do. The post bachelors entry level masters degree is not really worth much more than the ADN in the nursing community. In fact, most nurses with their MSN, that we worked hard for 6 years to get, tend to minimize those MSN entry level nurses. From my experience they are not that well prepared. I suggest going to a BSN program if you are planning on staying in this profession or advancing to the practitioner level. I have met some that couldn't get accepted into NP programs as they went to the MSN completion and really didn't have all the coursework for another university to accept them into an advanced program. On the other hand if you are looking just for a job, do that which will get you into the workforce the fastest. Remember, graduate credit is always more expensive than undergrad credit.
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