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  #11  
Old 10-19-2007, 01:17 AM
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Default Not sure about the DNP myself

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Originally Posted by KimRN View Post
Boy would I like to see the day that doctors and advance practice nurses (MSN or DNP prepared) see each other as health care colleagues instead of antagonists.

I think nurses feel this way already, the problem is on the medical side - I think it's a time factor, actually. As younger doctors come into the field and more APNs are found in the field the dynamic should change.

Lord knows here is enough need for health care to go around. I will say this: if I see a medical practice that uses NPs I have a much greater respect for that practice and will use the NP whenever possible!
I would also like to see MDs and NPs work as colleagues instead of antagonists as well. I don't see how becoming a DNP is going to make any difference in their perception or whether it will make any difference in payscale either. The insurance companies probably won't change their policies either. I will probably go back and get the DNP someday just because I am a perpetual student but will remain on the fence for now. I don't agree with it being the entry level. They've been trying for years to make the BSN entry level and can't seem to do that either. We'll see!
Thanks for using us Kim!
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  #12  
Old 10-19-2007, 06:58 AM
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Ok, so my physician is "Dr. So and So", my pharmacist is Dr. So and So A", and my nurse is "Dr. So and So, RN, MSN, DPN". Hmmmm.... Seriously, NP's at the Masters level is what the position was created for. And they do provide low cost health care, under a physican, in rural areas, with more advanced training than an RN. I guess I disagree that they be required to have a doctorate degree to practice.

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  #13  
Old 12-18-2007, 06:41 PM
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Once again I think it is a matter of standards. The NP plays a very specific role in the health system and Aust NP is a new phenomenon and still being worked out (I believe). But as more people become nurses the standards of these nurses need to be examined. We now have programs which go from any degree to a masters, but does this guarantee that they can do the job? From what I understand of the system you are sponsored to do your MNP here.

But don't forget that your doctor has got a degree not a PhD, they are two different doctors.
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  #14  
Old 12-18-2007, 07:18 PM
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The DNPs won't have a PhD, it's a clinical doctorate. I think the best parallel is the PharmD. They'll have more hours of internship, and a better understanding on a systems level than the masters prepared NP, and the opportunity to specialize (more than the current population-based family, adult, peds, or gero or psych). So it's more like having being a psychologist with a clinical PsyD)

As I said when I started this thread, I have very mixed feelings about this whole process. My biggest concern is how it will impact availability of providers in rural areas. But I guess it's too late now, it's a done deal in the US

It's interesting, my uni started its bridge DNP program this year (current NPs can get their 2 year DNP, they won't take post bachelor's students until 2009, who then will have a 3 year program). The only positive that I can see is that the last year is in essence a clinical residency, which is not the norm now, I don't think.
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  #15  
Old 12-18-2007, 11:05 PM
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Default Confusion

The only concern I have is...there are already so many different clinical levels and degrees for nurses, it's confusing for the public. by creating a DNP program it's muddying the waters even more. In my state, at least, DNP is not approved for teaching in Nursing Programs. So you've got PhD, DNP, DNSc, MSN, BSN, ADN, diploma programs, and LPNs....hmmmm. How will we sort it out?
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  #16  
Old 12-18-2007, 11:45 PM
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Wow, that's interesting that the DNPs can't teach. I know that here one of the approaches they're taking is "we have to have doctorally prepared faculty to teach in the new DNP program, and we want people who are clinically appropriate as well, so we'll start by taking existing NPs and offer them the DNP, and then offer them jobs!"

The one thing I do find interesting about how it's being approached at OHSU is that they took the first class and then closed the program until this first cohort is done. So, the class that came in in 2007, (all experienced NPs) will graduate in 2009. At that point they will start the post-bac program as well as a post masters program. They kind of want to get the first cohort through and figure out what then need to fix before they move on to the next cohort. Considering how many program changes I've been a guinea pig in, it's quite an unusual step!
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  #17  
Old 12-27-2007, 11:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Marachne View Post
Wow, that's interesting that the DNPs can't teach. I know that here one of the approaches they're taking is "we have to have doctorally prepared faculty to teach in the new DNP program, and we want people who are clinically appropriate as well, so we'll start by taking existing NPs and offer them the DNP, and then offer them jobs!"

The one thing I do find interesting about how it's being approached at OHSU is that they took the first class and then closed the program until this first cohort is done. So, the class that came in in 2007, (all experienced NPs) will graduate in 2009. At that point they will start the post-bac program as well as a post masters program. They kind of want to get the first cohort through and figure out what then need to fix before they move on to the next cohort. Considering how many program changes I've been a guinea pig in, it's quite an unusual step!
That IS an unusual step! It actually makes a lot of sense. Does OHSU have a regular PhD program in nursing?
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  #18  
Old 12-27-2007, 02:58 PM
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That IS an unusual step! It actually makes a lot of sense. Does OHSU have a regular PhD program in nursing?
Yup. That's the program I'm in (closing in on that dissertation defense....).

We also have a newish Masters in Nursing Education (focus on gero or community health) that I keep trying to sell you on Kim -- we've got some of the best nurse educators (Chris Tanner, Barbara Gaines) in the country, and innovative programs like OCNE, extensive simulation lab work, case-based learning that introduces "patients" in the first year who they follow (along with family and community) through their whole education.

You really do need to check it out (if you want any introductions to faculty, just let me know).

That goes for anyone else interested in graduate level work. If you're interested in the pacific NW, let me know!
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  #19  
Old 12-27-2007, 08:46 PM
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Yup. That's the program I'm in (closing in on that dissertation defense....).

We also have a newish Masters in Nursing Education (focus on gero or community health) that I keep trying to sell you on Kim -- we've got some of the best nurse educators (Chris Tanner, Barbara Gaines) in the country, and innovative programs like OCNE, extensive simulation lab work, case-based learning that introduces "patients" in the first year who they follow (along with family and community) through their whole education.

You really do need to check it out (if you want any introductions to faculty, just let me know).

That goes for anyone else interested in graduate level work. If you're interested in the pacific NW, let me know!
I will most definitely keep you in mind! Hubby not talking about moving soon - I'm working on him.
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  #20  
Old 12-28-2007, 01:48 AM
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I wrote somewhere else about nurses moving up the ranks to doctors - LPN/EN's moving up the ranks to be RN's and HCA/CSW's moving up the ranks to LPN/EN... etc... if anyone knows where I left it.... I'm a forum-slut, sorry.

Anyhow, it makes sense to me in the grand scheme.
Nursing is set to take up the slack from doctors (due to numbers issues etc) and will eventually become the lead role in assessing, diagnosing, determining and evaluating clinical care. Medics will probably act in consultation and liaison only.

However, patients have long dismissed nurses opinions because they weren't "doctors" and insisted on 'speaking with the doctor'. So lets give nurses title of Dr Nurse. That obviates the patient-doctor recognition issue. The title is academic, literally. And this academic title will promote not just nursing status, but also responsibility and accountability.
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