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  #21  
Old 04-03-2008, 11:52 PM
angelbev
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Originally Posted by KimRN View Post
I was "adopted" by a Coronary Care Unit as a relative new grad with only three months med/surg experience, so I was quite lucky.

I make it a point to give positive feedback to new nurses and find out the latest in techniques from them.

Precepting takes a special personality, and not all of the older, burnt out just-doing-this-until-I-get-to-retirement nurses have that personality!
why is there this *assumption* that if you are an older nurse you are *burnt out just-doing-this-until-I-get-to-retirement*?? I think we have plenty of older experienced nurses with a lot to offer. Too often they are discounted just becasue they ARE older. They are seen as *burnt out* by new young nurses who really have no idea what *burnt out* really is. Sometimes I think we need to step back and re-evaluate what we are thinking about others.
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  #22  
Old 04-07-2008, 07:30 PM
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I think the reference was specific to older nurses who are "burnt-out-just-doing-this-until-retirement," rather than to all older nurses. The post was not generalizing, but was simply describing a segment that may not be the best choice as preceptors.

*shrug*

BTW...I got completely eaten alive an older nurse yesterday! ARG! It's so frustrating when you're starting out on a new unit and you're scared, anxious, tense, nervous, and almost continually in tears from frustration--and the person orienting you gives you nothing but negative criticism. Yes, it was all valid, but delivered extremely viciously. It really knocks around the confidence that you've worked hard to gain over the years.

*sigh*

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Originally Posted by angelbev View Post
why is there this *assumption* that if you are an older nurse you are *burnt out just-doing-this-until-I-get-to-retirement*?? I think we have plenty of older experienced nurses with a lot to offer. Too often they are discounted just becasue they ARE older. They are seen as *burnt out* by new young nurses who really have no idea what *burnt out* really is. Sometimes I think we need to step back and re-evaluate what we are thinking about others.
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  #23  
Old 04-08-2008, 03:10 AM
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This goes back to the precepting thread Sean. Some people are just so much better at showing you what to do and giving you that feed back (both negative and positive) on your work. Those who give feed back by ripping you a strip appear not to know or care that your already low confidence level is further lowered making you less able to perform.

Keep at it Sean, you will be that great ICU nurse yet!
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  #24  
Old 05-24-2008, 10:30 PM
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I'm hearing many many things both from seasoned vets, from my friend who is a Chief Resident at SUNY:SB, from fellow future students, from reading blogs: Nurses, especially new nurses, garner no respect. From anyone.

I've read about doctors mistreating seasoned nurses, and I can only imagine how they'll treat ME both while I'm in school and when I'm new to the floor.

I've heard about older nurses and in-charge nurses bullying newer nurses, and 'clique-ing' them out (this goes for *all* skill and seniourity levels, this clique phenomenon), and I am so over that high-school mentality I fear for my ability to keep a civil tongue in my head.

I even hear about residents-- fresh out of Med School first year interns even, lording it over the nurses because they think they're superior to us.

I hear many many horror stories, but like I tell myself at work (I'm a waitress) people get weeded and get snippy and short, and I don't take any of that personal and hopefully they won't either. But seeing as how school thus far has done nothing but damage my faith in humanity in general, I know that there's going to be considerable workforce drama.

Is it really that bad?
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  #25  
Old 05-24-2008, 11:30 PM
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No it is not that bad. BUT KNOW YOUR STUFF!!! This is the main reason that I have seen where staff get cranky. If you are a first year you should know how to talk to a patient, feed them and move them (within reason) and when to stand back (scope of practice). People shouldn't be getting cranky if it is outside your scope. Final year students are the same, but by now you should be automomus with basic care and just need supervision for extended care.

With doctors, know your stuff. If you need to ask a question anticipate their questions back to you ie. don't go and say you patient looks sick without taking some vital signs and bring the medication chart with you. Know the rounds! if they are coming at 9:00 for a patient with dizzyness have your postural BP done by 8:45. If possible see them coming, grab the chart and stand by the door waiting, Take NOTES!! (on small notebook). While they are talking to the patient read the chart looking for trends in vitals etc. Have med charts ready. At end of the patient review you will be targeted for data, SBTA (stop, breath, think, act) and answer the question. Re-state any changes to treatment to the doctor and follow them out. You should get a 'thankyou nurse'.

I have done this as a nurse with good effect. however i have got strange looks when i have got the action of medication wrong.

Also know your anatomy. Had a long 'discussion' with a nurse about an MRI image showing the lateral ventricals of the brain, she said that it was gray matter, I said it was an empty space where the CFS goes. I was right.

No one should chew you out. But don't give people a reason to think they can. Follow procedure and common sense. And know what and why you are doing things.
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  #26  
Old 05-25-2008, 11:17 PM
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Is it really that bad?

Chomp....chomp....chomp...

No, it's not really that bad. Be yourself, do your best, and admit when you don't know things. Ask for help when you need to and seek out new learning experiences. Don't pretend to know everything. That's the best advice I can give to anyone that's new.
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  #27  
Old 05-26-2008, 10:54 AM
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Chomp....chomp....chomp...

No, it's not really that bad. Be yourself, do your best, and admit when you don't know things. Ask for help when you need to and seek out new learning experiences. Don't pretend to know everything. That's the best advice I can give to anyone that's new.
I agree. It's important to believe in yourself and to stand your ground. Show people respect, and let them know that you want nothing less in return.


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  #28  
Old 08-08-2008, 12:18 AM
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As a student in one placement I experienced some negative behaviour which I feel actually stemmed from a couple of things. Firstly the ward was under a great deal of stress at the time and maybe the leadership was not as effective as it might have been and second I suspect my precepter was a bit intimidated my me as i was an adult student with a long and varied work history. I think that horizontal violence stemms from, on the whole, people who feel powerless putting on those even less powerful. What do people think? I also think that the best prevention is strong leadership that can create an environment where it is not tolerated and people do not really do it to each other cause they know they wont get away with it.
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  #29  
Old 08-08-2008, 11:49 AM
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I think that horizontal violence stemms from, on the whole, people who feel powerless putting on those even less powerful.
I think that you have hit the nail on the head. People who feel powerless are the bullies in the workplace. Managers who look the other way when this stuff is going make the problem worse. The good worker quit, leaving a bevy of bullies behind.

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  #30  
Old 08-25-2008, 11:12 AM
DisappearingJohn
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Default Yep, it happens....

Everyone has good points about causes. It does happen, but I think it is starting to be less acceptable.

I think the influx of second and third career nurses is making it become more "noticed". Someone who has only been a nurse really doesn't notice it as much as someone who has worked in different industries, if that makes any sense...
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