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  #11  
Old 12-30-2007, 12:54 PM
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Kim brings up a good point when she said that everyone in the hospital is providing patient care. I'll never forget the day when my husband had an outpatient procedure done at a local hospital, and a surgeon placed him on a bedpan because the nurses were short staffed. I kept thanking him for his kindness, and he said it was part of his job as a patient care provider.
I don't understand why nurses want to get away from bedside nursing. It's nothing to be ashamed of, and it's what nursing is all about.
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  #12  
Old 12-30-2007, 07:12 PM
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I don't think it's a matter of wanting to "get away from" bedside nursing (BTW, one of my professors hated the term bedside nursing -- her comment was that we're not providing nursing care to beds, but to people), or a feeling of shame, but possibly a couple of other things:

1) As many have discussed in several different threads, part of what is so wonderful about nursing is the diversity of jobs. Acute care, which is what many people think of as "bedside" nursing is just one venue. There's home health, clinical nursing, school/industrial nursing, nurse educators, long-term care, community health, etc...I never wanted to work in a hospital. Working in a LTC setting, I do some bottom wiping and dressing changes, but I also monitor the care for 20+ people, work with their families, call in the other folks (PT, OT, Nutrition, psych, SW, etc) a lot of the time. I also pretty much monitor conditions and keep on top of the care of some fairly stable folks who can go south at any time. I work with my aides who are my eyes and hands and they know that if something has changed, that I don't want them to just chart it, or even to just tell me about it, but get me so that I can see for myself.

2)As several people have stated, the nursing model is the one that has the best chance of saving the health care system. By thinking and working holistically and systematically, where people are individuals but also part of larger family and community systems, we are a lot more likely to go beyond "fix the emergent system/symptom" and try and provide the best care for the patients.

To me, nursing is about care, compassion, education and advocacy and that's what makes it so vital...and (part of) why I'm proud to be a nurse, and proud to be in the company of such amazing people who provide such a range of care and services to help people maintain the highest possible level of function.
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  #13  
Old 12-30-2007, 10:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Mother Jones, RN View Post
Kim brings up a good point when she said that everyone in the hospital is providing patient care. I'll never forget the day when my husband had an outpatient procedure done at a local hospital, and a surgeon placed him on a bedpan because the nurses were short staffed. I kept thanking him for his kindness, and he said it was part of his job as a patient care provider.
I don't understand why nurses want to get away from bedside nursing. It's nothing to be ashamed of, and it's what nursing is all about.
First you speak of this double time and a half on Christmas and NOW you're telling us that a surgeon put someone on a bedpan?

I don't know what world you're living in, MJ, but it's a pretty darn sweet one! Let me in!!
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Old 12-31-2007, 04:48 AM
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I'd like to be part of it too
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  #15  
Old 01-01-2008, 12:15 PM
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I suppose I could share a modicum of respect for our medical staff who get involved when a patient gets aggressive. All our clinical and support staff have training in manual restraint (holding a patient) as a requirement to work the unit, with no exceptions. Several times I've seen the consultant come flying out of a meeting at the sound of the duress alarm ready to get into a physical situation, and on occasion being quick enough to get there before the nurses have contained it fully already.
I think he's just bored with prescribing meds and attending meetings tho.
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  #16  
Old 01-18-2008, 07:29 AM
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"some nurses recently said to me that nursing has changed so much and we do so much more, that we might as well be doctors"



I think people can easily overlook the fact that nurses are not 'doctors helpers'. It is a separate profession in and of itself, even though nurses work closely with doctors and the roles often coincide. Just as physiotherapists or psychologists or dentists, for example, are considered different.. so is nursing (all one part of the health care team). In my opinion, I think that instead of nurses thinking we might as well be doctors, I think the public needs to have a greater understanding of the holistic role the nurse plays...and how important that holistic role is to the recovery of the patient.

On the other hand, maybe what those nurses meant by that comment was that they might as well be given more authority (like doctors) in terms of diagnosing/prescribing.. or maybe they meant they might as well be given as much respect as doctors (if they feel less respected than doctors).. or maybe they meant they might as well get paid as much as doctors..

It's 6 am and I've been up since 2:30.. can't sleep so I'm not sure if I'm getting my point across the way I would like to :S
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  #17  
Old 01-18-2008, 09:13 AM
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Doctors and nurses have different approaches to medicine and the patient. One focuses more on the metabolic the other focuses on the physical and spiritual. As a nurse, I am not "under" a doctor, but I am his companion when I give care to a patient. I know, most of you are saying, "how can you say you are not under a doctor?" Yes, a doctor may have more education than me, but he/she does NOT have a license to practice nursing, only a nurse has that. By the same token, I do not have a license to practice medicine, only the doctor has that; even the advanced practice nurses don't have a license to practice medicine. I think that as nurses, some of us have forgotten that our approach is different than doctors but not less valuable. It is our assessment skills of our patients, our conversations with our patients, our interactions with our patients that give the doctor the tools he/she needs to do his/her job. If that is truly the case, how can I consider myself lower than him, but merely a compliment to him. As for the patient, if we do our job well, and the doctor does his/her job well.....then the patient gets the best care that this "team" is able to provide.
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