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View Poll Results: Do you call the docs you work with by their first name?
Yes, most of them. 14 29.17%
No, none of them. 10 20.83%
I do for some, for others I don't; it depends on the doc. 21 43.75%
I started using first names when I was asked to. 3 6.25%
I started using first names when I felt like it! 5 10.42%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 48. You may not vote on this poll

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  #1  
Old 08-29-2007, 12:28 PM
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Lightbulb Do you call the docs you work with by their first names?

Docs get to call us by our first names, but why is it not reciprocable? (Yes, I made that word up)

I've been at my current hospital for 7 years, but there are only a handful that I call by their first names. One or two have told me that I can; with the other few their first names just came out one day and since they didn't seem offended, I just kept at it.

I always call them "Dr. SoAndSo" if we're in earshot of patients or families.

There are some nurses I work with that call many doctors by their first names, but those are usually the nurses who have been there for decades working with these docs.

What do you do?

(Poll allows for multiple selections)
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  #2  
Old 09-01-2007, 02:19 PM
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We tend to be a lot more casual about names in the ER. The doctors even introduce themselves to the patients by their first names. I tried it with a couple of doctors just to see what their reactions would be and....the world didn't end! LOL! Maybe it's easier for me because the older I get the younger the doctors seem to get.
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Old 09-02-2007, 11:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KimRN View Post
We tend to be a lot more casual about names in the ER. The doctors even introduce themselves to the patients by their first names. I tried it with a couple of doctors just to see what their reactions would be and....the world didn't end! LOL! Maybe it's easier for me because the older I get the younger the doctors seem to get.
That's so true. It seems to me that ER nurses and ER docs are a tighter "family." You will see much more teasing and laughing going on between ER docs and nurses than you would likely see on on general floor. I personally feel comfortable calling all the docs I work with by their first name, but I never call them by their first name in front of patients.
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Old 09-03-2007, 09:59 PM
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Like the ER, the OR has a family feel among most surgeons and the staff (nurses and techs). It seems like people (surgeons and nurses) who have worked together for a long time are on a first name basis. They know all about each other's marriages, kids, etc.

I find that I have a tendency to be more informal with the residents calling them by their first name or by their last name sans the title "Doctor."
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Old 09-03-2007, 11:39 PM
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In the Hospital, There were Several docs who wanted us to call them by first name. I had a hard time with that and started going more in the middle with them...like instead of calling her Jane...she was "Dr D".
Now that I'm in a clinic I haven't gotten to a point where I could call the MD by first name. We do address each other by initials when we leave post its for each other.
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Old 09-05-2007, 06:30 PM
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Are you kidding? I havenever worked in a place where nurses call the docs by their title... maybe thats because ive always worked in critical care? I dont know..but id feel truly bizarre using anything but first names with everyone...
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Old 09-07-2007, 08:46 AM
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Sometimes I worked with older docs, and just couldn't find it in me to call 'em by their first name so they became "Dr. T" or "Dr. B" - I'd really use their initial. It was informal but was more comfortable for me.

Of course I was younger then. Now it's, "Hey Doc!, get your butt over here!" Just kidding.... : D
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Old 09-18-2007, 07:56 PM
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No, I never call a doctor by his first name. I'm too old fashioned to do something like that.


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Old 09-19-2007, 07:02 AM
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Here are the "rules" on the unit where I used to work:

Call interns, residents, and fellows by their first names. (As a student I tried to call one of the residents Dr. so and so and he was like, "please. call me Eric."

Call attendings Dr.
Unless you've known the attending for greater than 20 years, and then you call him or her by their first name.
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Old 09-19-2007, 07:31 AM
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Many of you use the term 'attending', we don't have that in the UK. Can you describe who the person is and what they do?
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