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  #11  
Old 09-18-2007, 10:52 AM
Jess
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Great advice P/J! Very informative and helpful. I guess I haven't been on many units yet, I've only been on 2 so far and it's been a mixture of good and bad nurses.

When I graduate and I'm a nurse and there are student nurses, I am going to be kind to them even if they look lost and confused.
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  #12  
Old 09-18-2007, 09:58 PM
jojodow
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Here's a good example of what being rude to Student Nurses can do.

The children's hospital here is fantastic. Our class only rotated out in one unit and that was one of the Med/Surg units.
The staff was so universally rude and unhelpful to us that not one of us (out of 60) went into Pediatric nursing (2 exceptions being 2 grads who already held CNA positions elsewhere in the hospital).

It was a miserable experience....but I loved being with the kids.
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  #13  
Old 09-19-2007, 12:19 AM
Jess
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Oh wow, I haven't even thought of that! I mean, it does kind of make sense from a student's prespective. If the nurses on the unit are mean, what are the chances that student nurses will want to work on that unit...

I'm actually looking forward to clinicals just to learn more, see the atmosphere on the units and to meet more nurses.
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  #14  
Old 09-19-2007, 02:56 AM
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Its such a shame when that happens. The staffing establishment gets stale and cliquey and no one new goes to work there, when actually what would make all the difference is some new blood and a new attitude to go with it!
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  #15  
Old 09-19-2007, 07:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jojodow View Post
Here's a good example of what being rude to Student Nurses can do.

The children's hospital here is fantastic. Our class only rotated out in one unit and that was one of the Med/Surg units.
The staff was so universally rude and unhelpful to us that not one of us (out of 60) went into Pediatric nursing (2 exceptions being 2 grads who already held CNA positions elsewhere in the hospital).
There were stories like that at some of the units/floors in my hospital. For instance, everyone was warned not to work in L&D because all the nurses there were so clique-y and did not welcome new blood. I'll bet around holiday time when they are understaffed they are wishing they had some "new blood" around.

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  #16  
Old 11-27-2007, 12:23 PM
kate loving shenk
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it's time....

it's time that nurses had some serious consciousness raising!!

students are our future!! and a future without nurses means a collapsing of the whole health care system!!!

We Can Do It, and Why Not Have Fun, in the process??!!
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  #17  
Old 11-27-2007, 01:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Julie View Post
Its such a shame when that happens. The staffing establishment gets stale and cliquey and no one new goes to work there, when actually what would make all the difference is some new blood and a new attitude to go with it!
Well I took a position with a "staff" that is stale and cliquey and what happens is that the new people don't stay. They move on to different units or jobs and then that stale, cliquey staff remains stuck right where they are. It is unfortunate for sure, for them.

On topic, we did our clinicals in 2 different facilities. One facility had very helpful and appreciative nurses while the other had nurses who made us feel as if we were just in their way. Even getting report at the second facility was like pulling teeth. My answer to that problem was no matter how much these nurses were annoyed or whatever, I always gave them the information that was pertinent about the patient. I also always gave the same information to my instructor so that everyone knew what was going on. At the end of the semester, we were able to fill out surveys about the facility, and that is where I would put in suggestions to make things better for students, and about the staff attitude problems. It can be hard to look past these types of attitudes when you are a student, but remember that it is the patient that counts and always comes first no matter what level of nursing you are, be it student or professional. If the problem is interrupting with the care or safety of the patient, then your instructor should be the liason to correct that problem.
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  #18  
Old 12-05-2007, 12:51 AM
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As a new grad, it is definitely strange working with the nursing students and remembering that I was there less than a year ago. But it is kinda cool at the same time.

My only pet peeve that I have to toss out there... make sure that you communicate with your nurse. Tell her what you can and will be doing (i.e. I can give all meds but need you to be there with me for the IV meds, I can do dressing changes), if you have a plan for the day and might need them, and update them if anything changes. And most of all, make sure that you report off to them before you leave the unit. If you are going for lunch, tell them. If you are done for the shift and leaving, PLEASE let your nurse know. I have had it a couple times where my student left and I didn't know it, and then I am left scrambling trying to figure out if everything got done. Don't forget, your patient is our patient too.
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  #19  
Old 12-05-2007, 01:29 AM
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We tend to bag nurses out there. But from talking to nurses that I have worked with they expressed their side. They never know what they are going to get, and in most cases (the nurses who I spoke to) found that the student was either not willing to do 'basic' nursing who had no idea about doing things.

We have just had some additional training so that we can work over the holidays as a lower grade nurse than an RN. The lecturer said that she has sent quite a few students back to their universities as they have been UNSAFE on their final placement, this is a time to polish your skills and she observed one nurse hooking up an IV full of air!

So. I think I said this in my previous post, there are nurses who eat their young, but there are also students who virtually climb into their nurses' mouths and pull the jaws shut. Students if you don't know something, it is not part of your current scope of practice; then tell your nurse.
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  #20  
Old 12-05-2007, 02:54 AM
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This is something we have encountered quite a bit of in the UK. I used to manage the student support team and I know they spent a lot of time looking at how we in practice can ensure that once a new nurse gets to the end of thier training they are safe and competent to practice. What is terrible is allowing someone to get to the end before discoviering this. Nurses who supervise students have a duty to teach students and to assess practice and those claiming to want to be nurses have a duty to learn the practical as well as the theretical side of nursing. The responsibilities in this need to be shared though.
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