Nursing Voices Forum  Meet other nurses, share your nursing knowledge and experiences
Nursing Talk from Around the Worlds

Go Back   Nursing Voices Forum Meet other nurses, share your nursing knowledge and experiences > Students

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 12-05-2007, 01:48 PM
Mother Jones, RN's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 425
Mother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond reputeMother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond reputeMother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond reputeMother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond reputeMother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond reputeMother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond reputeMother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond reputeMother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond reputeMother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond reputeMother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond reputeMother Jones, RN has a reputation beyond repute
Default

The nurses on our unit are very protective of the students. We are the mommy hens and they are our chicks, and the patients know not to mess with them. Since I started working on my unit about seven years ago, four former students have joined our staff. Why? Because we took care of them when they were students. It's a no brainer.

MJ
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 03-18-2008, 03:34 PM
Jasonrn
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default New nurse

I wrote off one of the hospitals where we were treated poorly by the hospital staff before I even graduated. What bothered me even more is that the staff nurse NEVER checked on the patient that I was caring for since she was so busy.

As a new nurse <9month post grad, I find that I don't like to have students share my patients. More times than not I don't know when they are leaving the floor, don't know what they're capable of, and some have even told my patients that they are the nurse for the evening. None of which are exceptable. I am very leary about student nurses. It may be that they are coming from a different nursing school but I would have been eaten alive by my instructor if I did any of these things. As it is, I have not been approached by any instructor as to my opinion about the care my patients recvd from the students.

Generally my floor does great with the one on one students. This I think works best and enables better trust. You get to know the student and their strengths and limitations. Its the group that descends on the floor with one instructor for 7 students that stresses me out (on a floor that mandates 1 nurse for four patients due to acuity levels). I think as I become more compitent I'll be comfortable with being around the youngins.
Keep this in mind
1. KNow your stuff(One of my instructors insisted that we have the top 10 meds given on the floor memorized for interactions, side effects, MOA before we could touch our patients.)
2. Communicate.
3. Admit when you don't understand something. I feel better when a student admits a short coming b/c then I know that they aren't working beyond their limitations.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 03-18-2008, 09:39 PM
NurseSean
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I love having students! I find teaching so satisfying

Jason: Don't be afraid to talk to the student at the very beginning of the shift and set up very clear expectations.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 03-19-2008, 01:21 AM
angelbev
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

hmmm..I also love working with students, but that is the key...working WITH them, not jsut having them care for one of your assigned pts. As students you should mostly be working side by side with them, or having some very clear expectations of what they will do when they are not at your side.

I also do think you will be much more comfortable with students when you are more secure in your own nursing judgements.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 03-20-2008, 05:15 PM
Julie's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 515
Julie has a reputation beyond reputeJulie has a reputation beyond reputeJulie has a reputation beyond reputeJulie has a reputation beyond reputeJulie has a reputation beyond reputeJulie has a reputation beyond reputeJulie has a reputation beyond reputeJulie has a reputation beyond reputeJulie has a reputation beyond reputeJulie has a reputation beyond reputeJulie has a reputation beyond repute
Default

We always have to remember that without students there will be no nurses tomorrow. Students can challenge your assumptions, can see things with new eyes and are very useful for finding out about new things on our behalf. What is more, I was one once, though it feels like a long time ago!
__________________
Julie
http://www.lifeinthenhs.wordpress.com
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 03-20-2008, 06:27 PM
Polaris
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I love having students too - as long as they are receptive to the learning process. A good (meaning desire to learn, not grades) student is a lot of fun and a joy to mentor. A bad student (meaning a know it all who doesn't listen to you anyway) is a nightmare and sometimes difficult to filter out. I've had both and my thoughts on the experience were completely opposite.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 07-24-2008, 09:04 PM
P/J's Avatar
P/J P/J is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Victoria, Australia
Posts: 348
P/J will become famous soon enough
Send a message via Skype™ to P/J
Default

If you are having trouble with the students get in touch with the clinical educator. Remember that the student is practicing under YOUR license, if they kill a patient YOU will be called before the nursing board to explain.

Find out what level the student should be at and compare it with the level that they are at. We usually shadow for the first two days before taking the load. This shadowing allows the nurse to see what level we are at and prove our practice to them.

Last semester 6 students failed the clinical component of their studies for simple unsafe practice (except #2).
1. Left an unstable pt in the shower by themselves.
2. Gave Oral panadol (acetaminophen) via IV instead of PEG. (Nurse was suspended by the board of nurses, student was called before the hospital and university to explain her practice)
3. Final year student put chlorhex on a skin graft.
4-6. Unsafe practice.
__________________
'Think not of yourself as the architect of your career but as the sculptor. Expect to have to do a lot of hard hammering and chiselingand scraping and polishing. - BC Forbes'
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 07-25-2008, 09:55 PM
runningnurse
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

As one of those instructors that drags around 7 students, it is nice to encounter a floor that is welcoming. I have been to floors where they didn't enjoy having us (while in school). I understand why nurses may not be comfortable with student nurses on the floor but if they don't go to that floor and learn how can they improve? As for licensure issues, it actually is resting on the instructors license, not the staff member (at least up where I work in Canada) I've actually had to fail 2 of my students this past clinical because of unsafe practice and not being able to put the whole picture together.
I think there is a big onus on instructors to let the staff on the floor know where the students are at and keep those lines of communication open- and if you do have concerns and the instructor hasn't approached you-approach them! Remember that they want to have students succeed and if they are unaware of issues then they can't act on them.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 07-25-2008, 10:56 PM
P/J's Avatar
P/J P/J is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Victoria, Australia
Posts: 348
P/J will become famous soon enough
Send a message via Skype™ to P/J
Default

Our uni has the moto 'Better we stop you for unsafe practice than the police get called because someone has died.' Thus they have no trouble stopping someone clinical practice for unsafe practice. If this looks like it is going to occur, they are given more lab time, and assessed by the lecturers directly (they come out to us on the wards). I have seen this done, where 4 different educators were called in to assess one student, all found her lacking in her basic knowledge as to why something is done.

We have 8 students per educator spread over 3-4 units per shift (am/pm). We work under the supervision of a 'buddy nurse' for that shift who always works on that unit. Our educator visits us each shift to quiz us, help out, answer questions. We debrief after the shifts and have Q.A sessions on what we have experienced, some catchup lecturers (now that we have seen how things present in the hospitals). When it is near assessment time (twice in 8 weeks) the educator will spend time on one ward per day (unless called away by another student) to assess us closely. We must do each new procedure with our educator first (injections, bloods, basic dressings, complex dressings, new types of medications) before doing them under the supervision on our buddy nurse.

Our buddy nurse is responsible for our practice while we work with them, thus we work under their registration. However if we do anything out of our scope of practice we are liable for our actions. I haven't come across any real dangerous nurses, but I have found some gaps in knowledge. Other students have witnessed some 'strange' nurses.
__________________
'Think not of yourself as the architect of your career but as the sculptor. Expect to have to do a lot of hard hammering and chiselingand scraping and polishing. - BC Forbes'
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 08-02-2008, 02:47 PM
Polaris
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I start my day with a student the same way every time.

First we sit down and I ask them what they can and cannot do. We discuss the "rules" for the day i.e. I need to know when they are leaving, they need the same from me. I need to know everything they know about the patient and anything they do to the patient. In turn, I let them know everything I know and do with the patient, etc. This works GREAT for opportunities to teach critical thinking skills.

I always approach it as a team with the student. Never as a "I'm the nurse and you're the piddly little student." That's not helpful to anyone - me, the student, or the patient.

If we treat our students right and train them appropriately they will want to come back and work with us. And in doing so we'll get nurses who won't take much orientation to a unit and will have a lot of the skills already down. IF you train them right.

The problem is getting a student who thinks they know everything already. Then I have to sit down with them and have a come-to-Jesus meeting. Lay it all out on the line. If I don't feel that we could have a productive team relationship I will request they be assigned to someone else.
Reply With Quote
  
 

Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1
Copyright © 2006-2012 Nursing Voices