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  #1  
Old 09-15-2007, 11:12 PM
Jess
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Thumbs up Tips/advice for nursing students

Feel free to share any tips you may have here for new student nurses.
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  #2  
Old 09-16-2007, 04:16 AM
jojodow
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First off....Study!

Like you didn't know that already..lol

Here are some things that helped me:

1. Form study group.
You'd be amazed at how much you'll remember if you talk about your material with other people.

2. Organize!
I had flow charts, flashcards, and binders to keep all my notes in the right order according to which subject came first to last.

3. Associate topics with personal life.
For example, I remembered Thyroid disorders based on my friend who had one. Hers helped me remember the symptoms.

4. Have fun!
I made up a song for remembering anatomy, cranial nerves, and functions for the kidney....still remember them! I made them up to the tunes of pre-school songs and the Wiggles....my daughter was a pre-schooler at the time.

5. Take time for yourself.
You have to make your brain rest too! Saturdays were my non-school study days most of the time. Test on Monday? I studied the week before and Sunday.

6. Pace yourself
It's easy to get overwhelmed in Nursing school. Don't be worried about the Neuro test at the end of the semester when you have a Cardic test coming up. One thing at a time!

Hope this helps!
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  #3  
Old 09-16-2007, 03:10 PM
Caroline
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Ditto what Jodi says. I would also add the following:

1. Don't gossip or backstab. Just...don't.

2. Be nice to your fellow students. Soon they may be your boss. What goes around comes around. If you can help them out, do so.

3. Don't be the person who has a personal story for every disease the professor brings up.

4. Sleep! Get a bedtime routine if you have to. Mine involves a complete end to all studying at 9pm (unless there's a really good reason to keep going) and then I take care of my teeth, read a few chapters from Harry Potter, and shut the lights off. Sometimes I take a hot bath, too.

5. Exercise. I know you'll be busy but it really helps. You need to keep yourself healthy.

6. Take one day a week not to study at all. You need it.

7. The theme for most of my suggestions is: TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF. You have to practice this now, because it will become even more important once you are taking care of people for a living. Never underestimate your own needs! Make yourself your number one priority!
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  #4  
Old 09-26-2007, 08:34 PM
Jess
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Great advice jojodow and Caroline! I think exercise is extremely hard for me since I don't have time! However, I think walking around campus counts as exercise, haha.

I think sleep is the best advice for all students, especially the day before clinical or an exam.
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  #5  
Old 09-28-2007, 05:07 PM
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Make sure you make time for yourself is great advice. Actually you are never too busy for that. When I was studying I thought life was busy, but then one day I found I had a full time job, a toddler, a house and was studying too!
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  #6  
Old 09-28-2007, 08:15 PM
neuronurse
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The best advice I got in nursing school was to find something other then nursing to look too. You need to find yourself a release. It's too easy to get caught up in the nursing world and before you know if all your friends are nurses and you don't know anyone else! Take time to decompress you'll need it later and appreciate that you know the best way for you
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  #7  
Old 09-29-2007, 11:55 AM
MyOwnWoman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neuronurse View Post
The best advice I got in nursing school was to find something other then nursing to look too. You need to find yourself a release. It's too easy to get caught up in the nursing world and before you know if all your friends are nurses and you don't know anyone else! Take time to decompress you'll need it later and appreciate that you know the best way for you
Great advice. Make sure you have friends outside of the medical profession because if you don't, all the conversations you have (or at least most of them) come full circle back to medicine.
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  #8  
Old 09-29-2007, 02:36 PM
starkissed
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A couple more things to add to the growing list:

Don't procrastinate. Especially if you have projects to do. Getting them started and/or completed before they are due gives you more time to focus and study on lectures/clinical/tests.

Learn how to say no. Sure it would be great fun to do many other things than study, but if you keep giving in to friends and family, who may not understand how rigorous the program is, you certainly could end up with a lot more free time because you might not make it through the program.

Forget memorization and learn rationales. If you only memorize the facts, then the critical thinking questions will get you every time. Learning the rationales and whys behind care will help establish the foundation for your future success in school, on boards, and in your job. Sure, there will be times you just simply need to memorize stuff, like lab values, abg's and such. But learning the rationales behind some of these will also help you remember them as well.

You are your first priority. You can spend a lot of time helping others in class, which is fantastic. But don't do it to a point that you end up "helping" them with their work more than they put into it. That only creates more work for you.

Be prepared for lectures. This allows you to be familiar with the material being taught that day. Also, it allows you to be prepared with questions if you aren't sure about anything at all. Plus, your instructors love it.
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  #9  
Old 12-20-2012, 06:09 AM
ianursestudent15
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Great advice neuronurse, while studying nursing, you should also find an outlet so that you can also breathe once in a while. A lot of nursing activities in school are really very stressful and having an activity which is completely different from the world of nursing can be very refreshing!
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