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  #1  
Old 10-11-2007, 01:11 AM
Caroline
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Default Being Type A

I am a straight A student and it drives me absolutely crazy. I have recently started seeing a therapist to talk about my anxiety, which I hide very well from other students, but on the inside I'm wigging out. Anyone else deal with this?

Part of the problem is my study group. They are all incredibly high achievers and they scare me with how in-depth they study. Literally, when they share their study guides with me, I get so panicky about never being able to memorize all the information (like, 25 pages worth of stuff!) that I end up not studying at all.

My therapist is teaching me some breathing exercises, and how to tune everyone out and focus just before a test (I have a lot of test anxiety) even if it means putting headphones on. I think it's really helping but it's still a huge struggle and I'd like to get it more under control before I start my career.

Not sure why I had the urge to share all this...anyone else have experiences/comments about this?
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  #2  
Old 10-11-2007, 04:21 PM
Jess
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I know what you mean. Studying for nursing courses is very stressful and I was just like you! I was a straight A student and all that, but now when I get a C+ or a B-, I say positive things like "Hey, it could've been worse, I could've gotten a C-!" Before looking at exam marks or something, I always don't think "I need a B+, I hope I got a B+." Instead, I think lower, like "I hope I got above a C-." Keep your expectations low so even if you do get a B+, you'll be very happy that you didn't get a C-.

Just keep reviewing, reading, re-reading and take deep breaths. If you really know the material and it's in your head, you'll do fantastic.
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  #3  
Old 10-12-2007, 03:06 AM
miss-elaine-ious
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Cool

I'm a type A as well. I think the best thing thus far is that you recognize that what you are doing is detrimental for your health and are seeking help!

I know how you feel as I am also a type A, in a program with multitudes of Type A's.

Perhaps you could look inside yourself and think about what motivates you.. what makes you tick that you need to have straight A's. What are you afraid of?

Good luck!

Elaine

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http://miss-elaine-ious.blogspot.com/
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  #4  
Old 11-14-2007, 03:19 PM
Mrs.Rollins
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I am definitely a stereotypical over-achiever, and school has been kind of crazy for me. I'm still pulling in A's in everything, but I cannot for the life of me relax and be happy about them! If I miss 2 questions on a 100 question test I will berate myself for a week. Thoughts of, "I should not have missed that! How could I have picked that answer?" and the like cycle through my head constantly.

The only thing that gives me any peace, honestly, is going into the clinical rotations and taking care of my patients. When I provide for their needs it no longer matters whether I missed 2 questions: I could have made a perfect 100 and that still wouldn't be what makes me a great nurse. It's about something else entirely.

Good luck with therapy. Keep breathing and remind yourself that you're going to be a great nurse, even if you stumble a bit on the way.
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  #5  
Old 11-15-2007, 07:58 AM
PixelRN
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In nursing school we used to say, "The person who graduates last in this class is still a nurse." (provided they pass NCLEX)

Underachievers of the world unite!

(tee hee)

Kidding aside, I used to stress my grades back in the day but now it doesn't amount to a hill of beans. If you are passionate about what you are studying, and you strive to understand it, you will do great.

(and deep breathing helps - I do it quite often!)
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  #6  
Old 11-15-2007, 12:32 PM
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The people with the best grades and those who write the best essays aren't always the best nurses. Being able to apply the theory to practice and demonstrating all of the skills we have spoken about often here are most important and what our patients remember about us afterwards.
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  #7  
Old 11-16-2007, 11:51 AM
jojodow
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I used to study really really hard for my unit exams. I'm not a type A personality and I have a dark laid-back side to me that reasoned that if aced my unit exams I wouldn't have to study as hard for my finals. A good semester was one where I only had to make like a 40 or 50 on my final to pass. I always did better then that though.
"A" students become "B" students in Nursing school. It's all those critical thinking questions with the gray area answers. Don't beat yourself up over it...just pass.

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Old 11-19-2007, 01:03 PM
Mr Ian
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What's an "A"?

My tutor remarked:
"Ian consistently sets himself low standards which he then fails to achieve."

People should aim for lower like I did. Life's not fun if you've no room for improvement....
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  #9  
Old 11-19-2007, 01:56 PM
MyOwnWoman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Julie View Post
The people with the best grades and those who write the best essays aren't always the best nurses. Being able to apply the theory to practice and demonstrating all of the skills we have spoken about often here are most important and what our patients remember about us afterwards.
Amen to that Julie!
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  #10  
Old 11-22-2007, 11:03 PM
m_rizzle
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I used to speak with a counselor who suggested something called "Pause Breathing", which I find works far better than taking deep breaths. It's similar to using a paper bag during a panic attack to control blood oxygen levels, except it's actually much more effective.

Works like this:

Take a long, deep breath. Exhale. Count to one then take another deep breath, exhale, count to two. Repeat this until you reach five counts between breaths, then try breathing normally. If you're still anxious, repeat it all over again.

I practice this a lot when I'm stressed out, and I usually calm down by the time I reach the four second paused.
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