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  #11  
Old 12-15-2007, 08:56 PM
MyOwnWoman
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GHOFG.........could it be..... a Dylan fan here on our forum?
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  #12  
Old 02-21-2008, 08:24 PM
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I agree with the last post--Nursing has so many areas of practice. I would get the BSN if I were you and as you go you will find the area you want to be in--and go for it.
I can't imagine anyone that has an interest in nursing not being able to find something that they love.
Good Luck I hope you do great!!!
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  #13  
Old 02-21-2008, 11:29 PM
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Originally Posted by coccia81 View Post
You shouldn't be concerned about not liking nursing. Nursing is such a broad profession. There are so many different outlets. If you don't like working on a hospital floor, you can do research, work for a pharmaceutical company, psychiatrics....the list is endless.
I couldn't agree more. It takes time, but everyone finds their niche. Don't be afraid, just go for it.

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  #14  
Old 03-21-2008, 02:48 PM
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I'm 37 yo right now and I am also going to change careers and go into nursing. I have a BS in Computer Info Systems and worked as a IT consultant for a number of years. The money was fantastic but I absolutely loathed my job.

I quit my last IT gig about a year ago and took more mundane work for the time being while I decided where I wanted to take my life. Way back, when I graduated high school, I considered nursing as my mom was a nurse for 25 years mainly in ER and ICU and used to tell me about some of her experiences. I thought it was something I could do but I did the computer path out of simple greed mainly.

Now that I am older and hopefully a bit wiser, I am going through the process of enrolling in the Nursing program at my local community college(the program is highly popular and seems to have a good rep).I love to help people and just want to do something that has a meaningful impact in peoples lives, however small. Wish me luck!
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  #15  
Old 03-21-2008, 06:35 PM
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Well done on enrolling in the program; it is never too late to change direction. While I can understand this is a pretty scary time, I am sure it is also really exciting. I wish you every luck and hope you will give us progress reports once you get started.
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  #16  
Old 03-21-2008, 08:39 PM
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I changed from Microbiology/Chemisty to nursing. Everyone in our course are finding where they fit into nursing. At the moment I am seriously looking at doing my graduate year in Psychiatric nursing. This is not to everyone's tastes, so others are going into different medical and surgical areas, each area attracts those who will best fit in, but it is not till you get out there in practice that you will really find your area.
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  #17  
Old 03-24-2008, 03:55 PM
Jasonrn
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You sound a little panicked. Work through this step by step.
1. Get the program schedules from different schools.
Some programs may advertise a BSN in one year but its really two once you count in the prereqs. Others are on graduate level so you pay graduate level rate. The bonus to this though is that you get graduate level loan money this should help with aleveating the cost. Are the clinicals easy to get or will you have to wait two years after completing classes to finish your clinicals that's whats happening at some of our AA schools in teh are. Four year for an AA. The ABSN students almost always get priority for clinicals at most schools. Why? the hospitals like the older students better. Nurse after nurse said how different we were from the undergrads. The other reason to get schedules is that many schools go year round. No breaks. That makes a big difference to those of us with families. Educate yourself about the individual programs

2. What do want to do in nursing?
If you want to do floor nursing. Then a BSn really isn't necessary but if you EVER want to teach or by an APN you need to start as a BSN. Most ABSN nursing programs with prereq are two years the same length as most AA or LPN programs.

3. Look at the acceptance criteria?
Many of teh ABSn programs require you to take the GRE. Others will want their own entrance exams. Regardless of what yuo decide start getting these out of the way first. Also remember that the acceptance counselors are salesmen and will downplay the hard stuff. Get it all in writing. Websites are often infrequently updated.

4. Realize that LPN make considerably less than an RN?
In some states there are serious limitations to what an LPN can do in a hospital. At my hosital they must be "supervised" by a nurse. This means that an RN has her pts plus the LPNs to check on. That sucks and some of us RNs resent the newer LPN b/c its so much more work.

5. What does you husband think?
His emotional support will be pivital to your success over the next two to three years. Remember that first year out of school is stressul and your scheudling ability will be at the bottom of the food chain so things ar still hard that first year. Involve in the decision making particularly once you've narrowed down the field to two or three options. He may insights you hadn't considered.

6. No garantees your going to like nursing.
But it sa wide open field from wound care to cardiac to home health, to community, to research. If you can't find what you want in nursing you may have some deeper issues to look into. Its a very people oriented field (with maybe the a little less in the OR or ICU but even there wantig to be around people is a bit of requisite).

7.) If a beleiver take it to God.
No matter what you end up deciding if you do it with the motivations then it becomes a bit easier. God can really give you peace about this decision. God doesn't always call us to something that is easy but can give youst rength to do what is right.
Hope that helps, Jason
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  #18  
Old 09-16-2008, 08:43 PM
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hello all.

New here.

Here I am, changing my whole life around at the age of 47. I need some advice and some encouragement!

I don't know how to make the story short and comprehensive, so let's just say I've had it pretty good financially for years and years, but we are now on hard times and being in sales just doesn't fulfill.

I'd wanted to be a Doctor at the age of 30 - but our finances took a plunge, so had to stop college and return to the work force (grudgingly). My sales career steadily climbed and I chucked the whole idea of medicine as a career cuz I was getting older and the paychecks kept getting better.

Last year, I was fired. I thought to myself (after crying and stomping and moping) "what a great opportunity to change my life!" So, took my savings, prettied up the house and prepared to sell, move and simplify our lives. $170K to 0K in one day. Small world/industry, rife with gossip and good-old-boy network - no chance for a 46 y/o to start over in the same town after 14 years with the one company anyway.....

BOOM! Housing market skids, but Polly-Anna here just kept believing it would sell "any moment", comp-ing the spent savings with the equity in the house and "Off we Go!"

Wrong. After 8 months and only $20K left in savings, I knew I had to get back to work to stop the financial bleeding. I also knew I couldn't afford to stay in the house any longer and if I were going to move, better do it now.

Well, the retail car market sure isn't what it used to be and frankly, after over 10 years of management, the combination of declined sales opportunities (and income) with being front-line sales is not appealing. ESPECIALLY in this rugged Utah climate of EXTREMES. I daydream constantly about how to do something of USEFULNESS with my life - not pounding the pavement in a car lot.

(so sorry for TMI!!! LOL)

Anyway, I am anxious to get the most marketable,lucrative AND rewarding degree in the shortest amount of time possible. BUT our circumstance will no doubt require that I still produce income during the study.

Unless the study itself is just tedious and time-consuming, I think I would be able to do both. That is, unless this reference to clinical time is the time consuming aspect of the study course....

Details - I need more details!

Oh, and by the way, this decision to up and move and start over has cost us both financially and credit-wise. We are making it by the skin of our teeth (haven't been this bad off since after the second child was born!) I am sincerely open to any and all advice on how to pull this off financially. (Wish hubby could just find something in the $100K/year thing!)

Help, help, help, help! I need to get started before I am just TOO OLD!!!

MLW
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  #19  
Old 09-17-2008, 07:25 AM
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Unless you really love helping people, stay out of nursing. Nursing school is demanding, and you must be disciplined in order to meet the rigorous academic requirements for graduation. It is also full of the same types of people who torpedoed your last career. Nursing will, however, give you some economic security in these hard times, however, be forewarned, a nursing career isn't bulletproof when times get really tough. Just like any other business, hospitals cut back to save money, and frontline workers take it in the chops. For example, I was laid off back in the 1980s and had to scramble to keep food on the table. I cleaned houses and worked at a fast food place to make ends meet. Give it some thought before you jump into a new career. Good luck.

MJ
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  #20  
Old 09-17-2008, 08:53 AM
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Our Uni dosen't recommend working while trying to study, this is near impossible for many of us. I wouldn't have made it without my partner (who I meet at the start). Not really knowing your circumstances, if you really love the idea of nursing you might be better off starting low in the scale (care attendant or equivalent)
But you might be better finding a job that can support you before you start to study.

The best way to realize what you can do without is to not have the money to buy it. Coffee (from cafe, starbucks, etc) is a luxury, if you want coffee buy it from the Italian supermarket and make it at home. Buy food in bulk and cook every meal, make every lunch. Everyone in the house is equal; My mum started studying when I was 5, my job was to clean the bathroom every week and help with the vacuuming so that she could study on the weekends. I stopped getting pocket money when my parents needed a new car and we got our first computer. If you have kids who are working (full time jobs not after school) they should be helping to pay for food, bills and rent.

Good luck!
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