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  #21  
Old 09-17-2008, 01:46 PM
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I've no problem caring for others - spent my whole life doing it, y'know?

I guess the main thing I'm wondering is about financial help. I am up to the study/learning bit - love learning!!! I do it on my own constantly! (Doesn't really go with the sales/car gig, does it? but then, that is an aspect of my character most people have found surprising)

What are the in's and out's of grants and scholarships? Is there a set of conditions that makes one more likely to qualify? (Man, do I sound LAME...)

Thanks,too, for the words of warning and the words of encouragement, as well.
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  #22  
Old 09-23-2008, 08:42 AM
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There are generally three types of scholarships.
1. Situational scholarships are for certain conditions - low economic, indigenous, rural and remote area. To apply you have to be disadvantaged in some way.
2. Academic scholarships are based on previous results, do well previously and you might be help to improve your qualifications.
3. Conditional scholarships are based on you giving something after you finished. This applies most with the army, navy etc, where they pay for you to study but after you are finished you work for them for a number of years (pay off your debt). The other example is when you have to practice in a certain regional area for a period of time. This is a common one here in Australia and med, where you do the course then work in a regional area for a min of 10 years.

In general you have to provide a cover letter, and CV stating previous experience and why you should get it. There might be an interview. Sometimes you get all your costs paid for (but probably not enough to support a family on), other times it is enough to pay for just books. Check your Universities, individual schools within the University (school of nursing), professional organizations, army/navy, nursing research groups, hospitals, etc. Look into them carefully as if you don't meet all the requirements you might find yourself locked into something you didn't expect (like serving time).

Hope this is helpful.
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  #23  
Old 09-26-2008, 05:18 PM
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Default If your heart is in it, you can do anythng!!

I'm 46 and am starting the nursing program in January. I have all finished my prerequisites and am very excited about getting going with clinicals. I will graduate, ADN, in 18 months, and plan on going straight into an ADN-BSN program (only 2 semesters!)
I have a wonderful husband who is my biggest cheerleader! I feel that my age has allowed me to approach this in a much more mature way. So many students have looked to me for motivation and I am often called "Mom" by some students, but that's OK. I have a 3.87 GPA and that is what they see, my desire, conviction, and an absolute "whatever it takes" attitude.

Don't be afraid, fear will only slow you down. Volunteer at the hospitals near you, see if you can shadow a nurse, or NA for a day, there are several ways that you can make sure this is really what you want, but beware.....Nursing is one of the hardest commitments to make because of the arduous academic schedule, and when that's over, working as a nurse is probably one of the most unappreciated jobs in the market.

Whatever you choose, approach it with courage, not fear. Hold your head high, and give it all you have!! That's the only way to do it!!

Best of luck!!
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  #24  
Old 09-26-2008, 05:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eppley1221 View Post
Don't be afraid, fear will only slow you down. Volunteer at the hospitals near you, see if you can shadow a nurse, or NA for a day, there are several ways that you can make sure this is really what you want, but beware.....Nursing is one of the hardest commitments to make because of the arduous academic schedule, and when that's over, working as a nurse is probably one of the most unappreciated jobs in the market.

Whatever you choose, approach it with courage, not fear. Hold your head high, and give it all you have!! That's the only way to do it!!

Best of luck!!
Excellent advice

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  #25  
Old 02-10-2011, 04:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eppley1221 View Post
I'm 46 and am starting the nursing program in January. I have all finished my prerequisites and am very excited about getting going with clinicals. I will graduate, ADN, in 18 months, and plan on going straight into an ADN-BSN program (only 2 semesters!)
I have a wonderful husband who is my biggest cheerleader! I feel that my age has allowed me to approach this in a much more mature way. So many students have looked to me for motivation and I am often called "Mom" by some students, but that's OK. I have a 3.87 GPA and that is what they see, my desire, conviction, and an absolute "whatever it takes" attitude.

Don't be afraid, fear will only slow you down. Volunteer at the hospitals near you, see if you can shadow a nurse, or NA for a day, there are several ways that you can make sure this is really what you want, but beware.....Nursing is one of the hardest commitments to make because of the arduous academic schedule, and when that's over, working as a nurse is probably one of the most unappreciated jobs in the market.

Whatever you choose, approach it with courage, not fear. Hold your head high, and give it all you have!! That's the only way to do it!!

Best of luck!!
I found your post very supportive. I am married with two kids (21 month apart) and sometimes I find it difficult to balance school and family. Now that I am going further into the program. I was told by my professor that we will experience all the nasty stuff and that make me wonder if nursing is right for me. Is it going to be a bored job though we are holding high responsibility.
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