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  #1  
Old 11-27-2007, 06:39 PM
linpolati
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Wink How did you all decide?

There are so many options when you gradute... job opportunites...going back to school. How did you all decide where you wanted to start? I have enjoyed doing my OB rotation, and would love to work in OB or should I stay in the Med/Surg area where I currently work as LPN? How did you all decide whats best 'right now' on life? I know I want to get a job, but where right now? What would be best for me being a New graduate?

Lins
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  #2  
Old 11-27-2007, 08:23 PM
MyOwnWoman
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This is my opinion and my opinion only. I think that working on a general medical/surgical floor for at least a year gives the new graduate the confidence they need to move where ever they want to go in the future. Getting confident in what you know, using your assessment skills without the use of monitors and gadgets gives a new nurse much more leverage because they learn to look and listen to the patient, not the alarms. Others may feel different.

I work the ER and I've seen more than one new graduate get intimidated by what goes on there. That first year should be one of growth, not intimidation.
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Old 11-27-2007, 10:09 PM
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This is my opinion and my opinion only. I think that working on a general medical/surgical floor for at least a year gives the new graduate the confidence they need to move where ever they want to go in the future. Getting confident in what you know, using your assessment skills without the use of monitors and gadgets gives a new nurse much more leverage because they learn to look and listen to the patient, not the alarms. Others may feel different.
I'll borrow her opinion. It's a good one!
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Old 11-28-2007, 07:29 PM
Polaris
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Originally Posted by MyOwnWoman View Post
This is my opinion and my opinion only. I think that working on a general medical/surgical floor for at least a year gives the new graduate the confidence they need to move where ever they want to go in the future. Getting confident in what you know, using your assessment skills without the use of monitors and gadgets gives a new nurse much more leverage because they learn to look and listen to the patient, not the alarms. Others may feel different.

I work the ER and I've seen more than one new graduate get intimidated by what goes on there. That first year should be one of growth, not intimidation.


Absolutely agree 100% and then some! Nursing is such a great field - you can do anything in any genre. But get your basics down first. That is a must do.

Good luck.
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Old 11-29-2007, 03:18 PM
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I also think that it is very important to get a year of med/surg under your belt before moving on to a specialty.

MJ
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Old 12-05-2007, 12:43 AM
LittleBird
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Talking

You sound like I did a year ago. All of the options are so overwhelming! What city, what hospital, what unit...? It is enough to drive you nuts! I was in the tough position that I enjoyed all of my clinical rotations (except for psych) and had always thought that I would go into pediatrics. Some people had told me to do some med-surg nursing before going in to peds (or any other specialty), others said that if I knew I wanted peds then to go straight there. It really is an individual decision. I know a new grad who is working on L&D right now, and had never seen a vag birth before starting her orientation there! The thing with nursing is that you can always try something different if you find out that you are in the wrong area. I ended up doing my consolidation on a surgical unit, and now I work on a general medicine floor. Now I am leaning towards becoming an ICU nurse someday... but you never know. I might change my mind again
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Old 12-11-2007, 01:51 AM
DisappearingJohn
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Originally Posted by MyOwnWoman View Post
This is my opinion and my opinion only. I think that working on a general medical/surgical floor for at least a year gives the new graduate the confidence they need to move where ever they want to go in the future. Getting confident in what you know, using your assessment skills without the use of monitors and gadgets gives a new nurse much more leverage because they learn to look and listen to the patient, not the alarms. Others may feel different.

I work the ER and I've seen more than one new graduate get intimidated by what goes on there. That first year should be one of growth, not intimidation.
Not to pile on here, but I agree as well (even though that's not what I did) I worked telemetry for 4 months (I had been a monitor tech on telemetry through nursing school) before transferring to the ED. I made it, and have flourished, but I have seen many who did not. ICU and ED are two areas that you need a solid foundation in the basics; the learning curve can be steep if not!

I've had peds nurses tell me that starting in peds med/surg is a similar "good start" for a new grad. As for OB, I haven't a clue... seems to me a good foundation is never a bad thing...
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  #8  
Old 12-22-2007, 08:07 AM
Icare4u
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Default critical care experience is a must!!

You should get med-surg experience because it will teach you how to organize and prioritize your time (the most difficult) Work in the ICU, it is the best place to get experience with all body systems and drips. I work in the ER, where everything is a blur and technical expertise is a value, but there is never enough time to analyze what you are doing. It is a revolving door, with little time to complete the most basic tasks and definitey little time to think. Work in the ICU,it is the best place to learn. Critical care looks great on a resume!!
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  #9  
Old 12-27-2007, 01:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MyOwnWoman View Post
This is my opinion and my opinion only. I think that working on a general medical/surgical floor for at least a year gives the new graduate the confidence they need to move where ever they want to go in the future. Getting confident in what you know, using your assessment skills without the use of monitors and gadgets gives a new nurse much more leverage because they learn to look and listen to the patient, not the alarms. Others may feel different.

I work the ER and I've seen more than one new graduate get intimidated by what goes on there. That first year should be one of growth, not intimidation.
We may be in the minority, but I agree with Geena and My Own Woman, a year in med-surg will give you a foundation for all other specialties. You will learn to prioritize like no one's business!
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  #10  
Old 02-21-2008, 08:13 PM
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My opinion is that any nurse needs the medical surgical experience. It is a fundamental type thing--a foundation to build on. It may take you a while to find your niche in nursing--but you will find it.
Never stop learning and never stop seeking opportunities that interest you.
I worked in the hospital while I was in school and for a year after that. Then I went to home health for 6 years. I like home care but I was working in QA and never got to see a patient. There was no where to move up to that I wanted to go so I left home health and took a job as an ADON in Long Term Care. I really did not want to work in a nursing home but the money was good and I thought it might be a stepping stone to the state. I had been there 3 days and I knew I had found where I belonged. Much to my surprise. I loved Long Term Care. I was DON for 7 years--I miss it so bad.
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