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Old 02-28-2008, 04:40 PM
Markie
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Default Are guys entering nursing a good thing?

Disclosure: I'm male, and new to being an RN

I'm curious what the consensus thought is about males being in nursing. Personally, I'm not convinced it's a positive thing overall.

Many people are moving into healthcare because of the long-term stability and earning potential. There are likely going to be jobs for the foreseeable future, and money can be quite good depending on geographic location. If these people are largely motivated by the financial aspect of the work, does that compromise other aspects? I believe a lawyer can be just as effective whether he/she "believe's" in a case. But is there something missing? Men overall are not typically the more compassionate and empathetic of the species; those that choose nursing are moreso than average I would think.

I'm wondering if the compassion most people associate with the nursing profession might be in shorter supply with this new influx of career seekers.

Any thoughts?
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Old 02-28-2008, 07:43 PM
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If you are going into nursing for the money, then you have the wrong industry. The degree of caring which is required really depends on the area of nursing which you are going into. Areas such as theater nursing, radiology; don't require the same degree of caring nature as ED, Clinical, Surgical, Psych; were Oncology, Palative, and age care probably require the most.

People care in their own ways, and we are having to move away for the 'hand maiden' view of nursing from the past. Some countries have always had male nurses such as India.

People have to stop looking at nursing as a female only occupation and start looking at what males can bring to nursing. In many situations it is not the first career for them, thus they have other skills which they bring to the job.

Male nurses care in their own way, too much effort goes into getting there when you are not getting payed much, for them not to be there for the right reason, but everyone's reason for becoming a nurse is different, and just because it may differ from your (royal your) reason, it doesn't devalue it.
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Old 02-29-2008, 12:24 PM
Markie
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So if I understand you correctly, the level of caring needed for a field may dictate whether a more mercenary approach is okay or not?

I think the line or decision on which require the compassion can get pretty fuzzy. A radiologist may not be holding someone's hand while they cope with a diagnosis, but wouldn't the level of attention and discrimination be boosted if the radiologist is more connected than simply by financial bonds?

I'm not saying you don't have excellent people who simply perform their job, get their check, and move right along. I'm just not convinced healthcare is a good fit for them.

Good points though.
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Old 02-29-2008, 11:28 PM
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I personally think that male nurses are great. Truly.

Admittedly I haven't seen a male nurse out-compassionize a female. I've never seen a male nurse hold a patient's hand, for example. They tend to approach their patients a bit more clinically than females.

I've never seen a patient refuse care from a male nurse.

I don't know why you would say it isn't an overall positive thing, though.

As for this quote, Markie: "I'm not saying you don't have excellent people who simply perform their job, get their check, and move right along. I'm just not convinced healthcare is a good fit for them."

We need nurses. We will continue to need them. As a patient AND a nurse, I would MUCH rather have the manpower that you describe above than no one at all. I don't need someone to hold my hand and stroke my brow - I have family for that. I want someone competent who does good work and I don't care if it's a man or a woman. To me, compassion is gravy.

Flame away!
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Old 03-01-2008, 06:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Markie View Post
So if I understand you correctly, the level of caring needed for a field may dictate whether a more mercenary approach is okay or not?
You did't understand me correctly. What I meant was that the money is not as good as many other industries, so I doubt anyone would go into nursing just for the money.

I thought we were talking about males in nursing? What I was saying that everyone has their way of caring. As a result nurses, both male and female, go into areas of nursing which match their interests and their level of caring.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Markie View Post
I think the line or decision on which require the compassion can get pretty fuzzy. A radiologist may not be holding someone's hand while they cope with a diagnosis, but wouldn't the level of attention and discrimination be boosted if the radiologist is more connected than simply by financial bonds?
No, because they aren't nurses, they are radiologists. Should nurses be payed more as a result, Yes (but do I suggest performance pay?).

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Originally Posted by Markie View Post
I'm not saying you don't have excellent people who simply perform their job, get their check, and move right along. I'm just not convinced healthcare is a good fit for them.
Well they wouldn't be excellent people then. Why is it not a good fit for them, you haven't given any evidence to your argument apart from blaming men for not caring, which I have seen to not apply to all male nurses, in fact I have seen more nurses (due to population) not give a flying duck about patients.
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Old 03-01-2008, 04:36 PM
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I have so many thoughts about men entering the nursing profession; all of which are good.

I think men have helped raise nursing to a higher level; giving the nurse more respect than she had before. In the "good old days," nursing was considered women's work and nurses were paid and treated accordingly. Since men have made nursing their primary source of income, the pay scale has increased along with the benefit packages and in some ways, the respect has increased. Men, although they can be very compassionate, are not going to be guilted into taking less than what they desire. In my humble opinion, for a long time women in nursing were guilted into "staying long hours," or "coming in on their days off." because it's what "a truly compassionate nurse" does.

Men in nursing has also done a whole hell of a lot for disspelling the myth that men are doctors and women are nurses. The two are different approaches to medicine. Not every nurse wants to be a doctor and "settles" for less. We go into nursing because that it the kind of care we WANT to give. Men entering the work force has helped to let others see that nursing is separate from doctoring and being a doctor.

I also think that sometimes, a male patient talking to a male nurse has more of an inpact when it comes to the "private things" that older men just don't feel confident talking to pretty young female nurses about.

All in all, I think we compliment each other. I do things for them, and they do things for me; and all is good. I'm mostly glad from my male counterparts; it's good to know that they have my back, and it's good to let them know that you have theirs.
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Old 03-03-2008, 02:16 AM
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Quite frankly, I think that it's good when anyone enters this profession, whether they are male or female. I AM looking forward to a day when prejudice against male nurses is a thing of the past*

I saw a statistic that currently more than 50% of new doctors are female (sorry, no source to back me up). Perhaps, soon, more than 50% of new nurses will be male!

*I've narrowed down the perception of some patients toward male nurses as the following: They feel that we're either a) too lazy/stupid to become doctors or b) trying to get a free look at naked women.

And lets face it, nobody wants a stupid lazy pervert as their nurse!!!!

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Old 03-03-2008, 05:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NurseSean View Post
*I've narrowed down the perception of some patients toward male nurses as the following: They feel that we're either a) too lazy/stupid to become doctors or b) trying to get a free look at naked women.

And lets face it, nobody wants a stupid lazy pervert as their nurse!!!!
But how come it is always the 84y/o woman that thinks that! I get enough attention when I go out, from people closer to my age.
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Old 03-03-2008, 08:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MyOwnWoman View Post
Not every nurse wants to be a doctor and "settles" for less.
tut tut tut MOW for even going that close to saying nurses are less than doctors!
Nurses choose to have greater patient contact and do nursing work. Has nothing to do with superior/inferior roles - and I just know you weren't trying to imply that... but you put them there words in the same sentence!!

I think there are two issues in the original question:
1. Male nurses - compassion is not the main requisite of a nurse anymore. Granted there are many values that are grounded in compassion and empathy (advocacy, uncondtional positive regard, catharsis) but there are more skills and knowledge now than ever before. Having less or no compassion does not mean you cannot complete 90% of the job effectively. I'd also like to challenge the male/female compassion dichotomous belief too - as I've seen good/bad examples of both.
2. Career nurses - these are not just males, but are those less likely to have compassion as they are more status-achievement driven/rewarded than those more philanthropically rewarded. Doesn't mean there can't be compassionate nurses with status - but they are less cut throat in getting there*

(* had to say that or julie-intheNHS would beat me)

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Old 03-03-2008, 04:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Ian View Post
tut tut tut MOW for even going that close to saying nurses are less than doctors!
Nurses choose to have greater patient contact and do nursing work. Has nothing to do with superior/inferior roles - and I just know you weren't trying to imply that... but you put them there words in the same sentence!!
I think you misread my post a little bit. I was stating that patients mistakingly think this of male nurses. I wasn't implying that I believe this. In fact, the fact that I don't believe this was the whole point of the statement.
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